A Look Into The Future Of Marketing

November

17

0 comments

Break out the crystal ball. I’ve got a special guest with me today, Pat McGovern from Ascedia and we are going to talk about the future of marketing. What are the macro trends and what are the biggest trends coming down the pipe? You don’t want to miss this one.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Pat McGovern for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

Watch This Episode


Listen To The Podcast

Subscribe To The Podcast

Apple Podcasts
Spotify
Google Podcast
Stitcher
iHeart Radio

Read The Transcript Here


Podcast Transcription

A Look Into The Future Of Marketing

Tim Fitzpatrick
Break out the crystal ball. I've got a special guest with me today, and we're going to talk about the future of marketing. What are the macro trends? What are the biggest trends coming down the pipe right now? You don't want to miss this. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe you must remove your revenue roadblocks to accelerate growth, and marketing shouldn't be difficult. I am super excited to have with me today, Pat McGovern from Ascedia. Pat, welcome, and thanks for being here.

Pat McGovern
Tim Fitz, it's awesome to be here. I'm really excited about this podcast. Thank you for having me on here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love the fact that you call me Tim Fitz. You may make it stick here.

Pat McGovern
Okay.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I always enjoy connecting with you, man. Your energy is contagious. So I can't wait to talk about trends, what's happening in marketing. There's always something going on in marketing. Right now, though, I think there's a lot. Before we dig into that, I want to help people get to know you a little bit. Ask some rapid-fire questions if you're ready to jump in.

Pat McGovern
Fire away, sir.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Pat McGovern
I enjoy running. I'm a big runner, and I also enjoy reading.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Long distance running?

Pat McGovern
I would say medium distance. I'm not ultra, but probably averaging in a week between 35 and 50 miles.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. Yeah, that's not bad, man.

Pat McGovern
It's decent. It's decent. There's a lot of people who do a lot more, but it's decent.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's your hidden talent?

Pat McGovern
I believe my hidden talent is the ability to connect people with one another, and I really enjoy that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Pat McGovern
Yeah, that's a good one. The best piece of advice I got was from a buddy of mine, Mr. Peter Capper, who I think he got this from someone else as well. And the advice is just focus on the business. And what that means is no matter where you're working, and this is a time when I was at an agency, there's always drama around the office. You know what? Focus on the business. Everything else will take care of itself.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Pat McGovern
I would say I'm funny. That surprises people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I can vouch for that. You are. What does success mean to you?

Pat McGovern
Success is being content and delivering a good product. So I've never been a money guy, rather am I connecting people and feeling good about the work that I'm doing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Pat McGovern
Dude, I live in a perpetual happy place. I carry it with me 24/7. So it's like anywhere I go, I could find happiness.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Pat McGovern
Yeah, dependability and loyalty are probably the two biggest. People who commit when they say they're going to do something, they do it. And you know they always got your back.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So tell us a little bit more about what you're doing at Ascedia.

Pat McGovern
Yeah. So, Tim, what I do is I'm the Director of New Business Development. So what that means is I'm looking for new business for our agency, which means I'm just connecting with a lot of people. Sometimes that turns into work for the agency. A lot of times it doesn't. A lot of times it's just me trying to connect people with other people to help them solve a problem. Look, I've been in this game a long time. I understand what we do and what we don't do. What we do is pretty narrow. We do website design and development. We do digital marketing. Not everybody has a need for that. I get it. But you probably have other challenges. You're probably looking at other things. So talk to me. Where can I help you out? That's what I do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it. So let's talk about marketing, man. Let's talk about the trends.

Pat McGovern
You want to jump in?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Pat McGovern
So, Tim, you really set this up nicely. Marketing is changing so rapidly. And as I was preparing for this podcast, I wanted to focus on the things that I saw that I think people could walk away with that are going to impact things in the next 12 to 18, maybe 24 months. So these aren't like, hey, 50 year trends or anything, but these are more actionable items that I am seeing, one, from talking to people on my podcast, two, just from being out in the market, three, from my readings. So that's where this knowledge base is coming from, okay?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool.

Young People Getting into the B2B Space

Pat McGovern
And let me focus on this other part of it, too. I'm going to be talking about the B2B space, right? So the B2C, there's a lot of stuff happening there. I believe actually there's going to be more stuff happening in B2B, and I'll get to that in a minute. But those are going to be, keep that in mind when we're talking here, okay? For those who out there who are listening to this. So let's start with the B2B space overall. I believe there's a renaissance happening in this sector, and that's being driven by just a generation aging out. So people are just retiring quicker and so this is opening up opportunities. I'm seeing a lot of young people getting into the B2B space, and I think they're getting into this because it offers them the flexibility to do a lot of cool things in marketing, and they're taking the things that they've learned in the B2C space and bringing it over to the B2B area. So this is going to continue to happen. This area is going to grow. This area is going to be... I believe there's going to be a lot of interesting things that are going to be happening within that sector. So I would say one big trend is that is growing. That is keeping eye out for what's happening there.

Fractional CMO Positions are Going to Be Growing a Lot

Pat McGovern
As a result of this, one of the areas I believe is going to be growing a lot, is the fractional CMO position. Tim, you and I have talked about this. Marketing CMOs are becoming a unicorn, right? Today's CMO has to know everything from branding basics, to your tech stack for marketing to HR, as well as digital marketing, it's becoming super hard to get that person. There's just too much to get there. Additionally, in small to medium size organizations, trying to bring in a CMO, we're talking 200K plus, right? I mean, that's just the lay of the land. Whoa, time out. A lot of organizations do not have this. Plus, they just can't afford to keep somebody like that on board for a long period of time. A fractional CMO is a very valuable piece, and they're able to bring in specialties. So, for example, hey, I just need someone to set the strategy. Once we get that, then we may need to fine tune things every now and then. So this area is going to be growing. And I think this is really a great opportunity for again, small to mid-size organizations in the B2B space to go, look, I could play with the big boys. I just got to be smart about the dollars that I'm using, bringing some of that talent. Okay, so that's the B2B space overall of what I'm seeing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Can I add? Pat, I want to add to that last thing you mentioned about the fractional space because more and more business owners, whether it's a chief marketing officer or a chief financial officer or an operating officer, more and more business owners are getting tuned into the fact that, hey, I don't always have to hire this higher level executive full-time and spend all that money when I don't need to, which I think is a fantastic trend. Because one of the things that I see all the time on the marketing side of it is I talk to businesses where the owner is trying to run marketing with it's one of four or five, six things that they're trying to do. And inevitably because marketing is not their thing, they don't have a ton of time for it, they make common missteps and mistakes that cost them money. And so I think one of the hurdles that business owners have to get over when they're looking at hiring any fractional person or even an advisor, right? Is this person is going to help me get to where I want to go faster, but they're also going to help me avoid the mistakes. Because when we make mistakes, especially the higher price mistakes, man, if we could have been paying somebody else to help us avoid those things, it's a wash, right? It's money actually coming back into your pocket. And so I think that's something that's really, really important because we don't know what we don't know. And when we bring in outside people, one of the reasons we're hiring them is because they have that experience and they have the ability to say, You know what? That's not something you need to do right now. Or that money should actually go over here rather than here, and here's why.

Pat McGovern
Tim, so much there. So let me just pull a couple of threads out from what you said.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, please do.

Pat McGovern
And that is the first thing is you use the line, going to put dollars back in your pocket.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Pat McGovern
So this goes back to what I said. There is a fundamental change going on in the B2B space where a lot of B2B, the older, looked at marketing as just this is a cost center.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right.

Pat McGovern
Where you should be looking at this as saying, this is a money machine. I'm going to invest a buck. I'm going to get three back. With that mentality going on, that's why you have more people going into this, more younger people going into this space because that is changing dramatically. And this is just going to feed what the points that you're talking about, because they're going to demand like, we got to get a strategy. We have to get these things in place. So, yes, 100 % on that stuff.

The Expansion of Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Cool. So you touched a little bit about changes in the B2B space. What's the next trend you're seeing?

Pat McGovern
So let's dig in with AI because you can't talk about trends without talking about AI.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. And talk about evolving quickly. AI is evolving so fast.

Pat McGovern
Right. So the buzz around marketing, especially when you're starting to talk about agencies, well, is AI just going to put people out of business? Is AI going to put writers out of business? Is AI going to put graphic designers? The simple answer is I believe yes, some. It's not going to be that wholesale gutting in Armageddon that maybe some talk about, but it is going to have an impact. But I believe within the B2B space, I could see other things happening quicker and having more dramatic impact than somebody who knows how to use AI to write copy, marketing copy. And what I mean by this is I think there's going to be a big impact on customer service. We have chatbots right now. So if you go into a site and you want to get some answers, a lot of times, hey, talk to the chat. And he'll come back with some pat answers that have already been programmed. What's going to be happening, and it's going to be happening quickly, is voice chat, where it sounds like a real human talking to you and delivering real time advice before you get to a real person. That is going to help out sales, that's going to help out marketing. That's going to be a real dramatic impact in the B2B space as far as that. So that's going to be happening. There's a mega trend, Tim, that I have been seeing for a while, which is the demand for quicker and quicker turnaround from either consultants or agencies, et cetera. What used to take four weeks? Awesome. What's the two day thing look like? What used to take six months? Hey, what does a week look like? That's not going to slow down. AI is the jet fuel that is going to speed that whole thing up. So that's not going to go away. I believe that people who embrace that and use speed as a point of differentiation are going to win more business. So Tim, I could come to you and say, look, we're going to be able to do this, this and this, and I'm going to be able to get you something by the end of the week that's going to show you how to wait, right? By the end of the week? I mean, you're going to be able to use that if you can effectively get your AI game down, you're going to be able to effectively use this to win more business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You dropped some serious stuff there. I want to pull a few things out because I totally agree with you. I think the customer service side of it is going to be huge because I know, and man, if you've had a better experience, I would love to hear it. But up to this point, I have never had a chatbot experience on a website that was any good. Frankly, it was so bad that it made the experience worse. You shouldn't have even had it because this thing can't answer a damn question I have. Now, I know for a fact that is going to get significantly better with the AI technology that's evolving right now. So I think that is going to be better. I just think that a business's implementation of that needs to be well thought out and tested because if it's not done well, it's worse than actually not doing it at all. I think people are going to need to make sure that it is providing a solid customer experience, right?

Pat McGovern
Yep. I would agree with you, Tim. But let's just look at things from this level, too, is it's not going to be perfect in... And you could implement something and five months from now there's going to be some new technology that makes that even worse, right? It's going to be even better. You at some point as a B2B, President, CMO, whatever title in the C-suite, sometimes you just got to jump in and go, We're in this thing, and six months later, we'll redefine what it is. We'll evaluate where it is. But pausing and waiting to get it all perfect...

Tim Fitzpatrick
I totally agree.

Pat McGovern
It's going to pass you by.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, totally agree. At some point, you got to just make the choice to execute and iterate and learn from the experience. I totally agree with you. The other thing that I'm also seeing with AI because there is so much stuff going on with AI, and there are so many different tools. I think as a small business owner, one, I think you want to stay on top of it and make sure that you're not missing opportunities to do things more efficiently, better. But at the same time, there's so many tools we can't buy all the freaking tools. And so I think it's going to be important, at least in the short term, to really focus on those AI tools that can help you do a lot of different things rather than... I mean, it's hard to be a Jack of all trades, but look, I mean, a lot of the stuff that I'm doing right now that we're doing with AI is all through ChatGPT at this point. There are so many different AI marketing tools, but if I bought them all, I'd be spending thousands of dollars a month on all these tools. So with ChatGPT, and I'm not saying it's the best or it's always going to be the best, but right now there's so many different things we can use it for, and it's doing a really good job. I'd rather pay for that one tool and let the dust settle to see what else happens. What are your thoughts on that?

Pat McGovern
So it's a perfect segue into this point, which is my last point about AI where I see a huge advantage. It is businesses developing that are consultancies slash agencies that are AI-focused. So I come to your organization, Tim, and go, tell me your problems. And I have AI solutions for a number of them, not just marketing, but maybe for accounting, maybe for customer service, maybe for HR. All of a sudden, you're coming in and solving a lot of problems by understanding AI and what it'll take to implement these changes quickly and efficiently.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Pat McGovern
I believe that could be like a huge business for a number of organizations, right?


PUSH THROUGH YOUR REVENUE ROADBLOCKS! 

Get the outside eyes and feedback you need to get on the right path with your marketing.

Gain clarity and understanding. You'll leave your discovery call knowing where to focus your marketing efforts right now to get the best return on your investment.

Micro Influencers and Brand

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, totally agree. What else? Do we talk a little bit about AI? Want to keep going? Yeah. Let's keep banging them out, man. I love this. So we talked a little bit about the B2B space, AI.

Pat McGovern
Let me talk about micro influencers and brand. I'm a brand guy. I believe brand is super important, but people don't want to hear from brands anymore. When I say that, I'm saying they don't want to have the brand messages come from just the brand. And with certain exceptions, there are certain brands out there that do demand attention. But by and large, and especially in the B2B space, people don't care. They want to hear from other people. Micro influencers is something, and it's going to continue to be, again, I think, an important channel for marketers in the next 12, 18, 24 months. People are going to be looking to these influencers to help carry that brand message. And it really dovetails into my next point. But companies are going to be looking to use these guys as a way to help shoulder a lot of the content that's being pushed out. And when I talk about micro influencers, this could range anywhere from several hundred to several thousand. It doesn't have to be big. It just has to be a good fit for your organization.

Tim Fitzpatrick
The thing that I find interesting about, so with micro influencers, I'm seeing a ton of people... We used to be talking about influencers. I'm seeing tons of people talk about creators at this point as well, which honestly, I mean, they're creating content, right? And they're creating information that they're putting out there. I think with micro influencers and with creators, some of these people have super niche audiences, and it can be a fantastic way to get in front of a very specific audience and be endorsed by somebody that this audience trusts.

Pat McGovern
You got it. Amen, brother Tim.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Some of the creator email list that I'm on, well, frankly, a lot of them are driving revenue with paid placement in their email newsletters, but their open rates are very high, their click-through rates are very high. So I think as a small business, it absolutely makes sense to keep your eyes open to potential small influencers, smaller creators to have your audience to really take advantage of that.

Pat McGovern
Right on. And where the shift is also going to happen, I believe, Tim, is organizations will, when we talk about micro influencers, will also back some of the employees that are doing this as well. They used to be a little bit of taboo hey, how much do you want to cross that line? People are going to be leaning into that more. And I think that's an awesome way to have the whole organization be talking about the brand.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. You know what's so fascinating? You said, so what you're talking about there is businesses being open to people that are on their team- Absolutely.

Pat McGovern
Exactly what I'm talking about. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Creating content. So I'll give you a perfect example. I cannot remember her last name, but her name is Jade. She's a creator. And I can't even remember the name of it. But she works for Google, and she is a creator. She puts out a weekly email about being rich, not rich in money, but rich in life. And there's all kinds of cool tips in there. The content is very easy to read, digest, and it's super actionable. But perfect example, she's in marketing with Google. But look, Google is huge. But perfect example, she's creating a huge following, still works for Google. Who knows how long she'll work for Google? I don't know. But I actually interviewed a CEO for a managed service provider a couple of months ago that talked about this, where he actually encouraged his salespeople to have side gigs. He wanted his salespeople to have side gigs because he just felt like, one, it was good for them personally, but two, that work brings additional exposure to their brand.

Pat McGovern
As well. Exactly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Exactly. And so to me, Pat, it really seems like this is a mindset of abundance rather than scarcity.

Pat McGovern
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And I think there are so many opportunities for businesses to take advantage of that. So I totally agree with you, man. I love that.

Pat McGovern
And here's the problem. Well, what if, Tim? Yeah, I understand that. But what if Pat goes off the rails and says something or what if Tim does something wrong? Yeah, it's going to happen. We're going to make a mistake. Let's go. Let's go again. It's about speed. It's about forward momentum. It's about progress. And we'll deal with that stuff when it comes up, but we could belabor this and keep talking about it and go around the round and not get anywhere. In the meantime, businesses, we're leaving money on the table. We're missing out on opportunities. We're falling further behind.

Tim Fitzpatrick
The downside risk to me is so much smaller than the potential upside. So why worry about all the little potentialities that might happen? Let's just know that we've got the ability to deal with it if and when it comes up, and we're just going to go down this path. But I also think too, though, that if you choose to go down that path, you can then bring people in to help make sure that your team that's actually going to start doing this has the tools they need to be successful. Yeah.

Pat McGovern
You and I are on the same page with that one. Let...

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. 

Video and Attention Spans

Pat McGovern
Me go to the next. Video and attention spans. So we know about TikTok. We know about YouTube Shorts. I don't know if you know this, Tim, YouTube Shorts is growing at a 130 % year over year. Tiktok may in the next three-ish years, some have predicted that it'll overcome Meta. In the next five to seven years, it may be bigger than Alphabet, which is the parent of Google. That's bananas. The format there is short video, by and large. So again, if you're a marketer, if you're a business to business person in this space looking at that's the way the current is going. Get in that current, right? That said, that. There is also opportunity for lengthy portions as well. Consider Andrew Huberman, consider Joe Rogan, consider just even binging on Netflix. That happens quite a bit. Joe Rogan on a regular basis, produces three hour plus podcast. Same with Huberman, right? Yeah. If you have good content, people will consume it. Highlight good content. You're providing a really strong value there. So there's at economy. Most of this is going to be probably short form, but there are opportunities to go longer form if you could tell the right story and the interest is there, right? Yeah. That's segues, and before I go to the next point, Tim, the idea of video. I think this is a great opportunity in why organizations should lean into micro influencers. Let's be honest, creating videos, produced videos at scale, it takes time. It takes effort. Okay, let's try farming that out with people who are already doing that. Let's take that burden off of maybe the organization. But if we work with other influencers, we could get more of that content going more frequently.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Well, the other thing too, to consider with short form is most short form is not super polished either. Right? So it doesn't always have to have high production quality. I think the thing, and this is a little different for me, so I'd love to get your take on this. But man, I produce a lot of short-form video. I do not consume a lot of short-form video. My kids are 12 and 13. They would rather watch YouTube shorts or TikTok than a television show. I don't think my kids are out of the norm there, which if as older... Because I don't know, but do you watch short-form or is it not your thing?

Pat McGovern
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Look at some of the stuff my kids are watching and I'm like, This is stupid. I don't get it. But it's addictive. They're just going from one to the next. And to me, that's really fascinating because I think there are obviously huge opportunities to take advantage of short-form because like you said, it's not going away. Demand continues to increase. Outside of business, short-form is going to change how people are consuming. I mean, what's going to happen with television shows? I don't know, man.

Pat McGovern
Right. What blows me away, Tim, is thinking about my own life is how much I'm now using TikTok just to explore things. For example, how do I do this in Excel? How do I do this in Powerpoint? How do I make this? What are the things? It's becoming that like searching tool with the video of how to get this stuff done. That's only going to keep increasing, right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Pat McGovern
Now think about the power in that for a B2B. Here's how you do this. Here's why there's a lot of opportunities that people just have to more fully embrace.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I totally agree.

LinkedIn

Pat McGovern
This leads me into the next point, and I don't mean it maybe sounds contradictory, but let me explain. Yes, YouTube and TikTok are very, very important. However, if you're in again, small to medium size business, you're doing some things on social, but you're doing them all half ass. You're not really getting any impact. The area I would focus next 12, 18, 24 months is I would be putting my chips down on LinkedIn. That to me, is the best B2B social tool that you can do right now and invest in. Tim, some crazy stats here. 60% of the users on LinkedIn are between 25 and 34 years of age. That to me seems like prime people that you want to be attracting, right? There are 202 million people in the US alone, just the US alone, 930 million total, but 202,000,000 in the US alone. So you have this huge base. Here's what just blows me away. There is something like 1-3 % of the overall base that are producing content more than once a week. So that to me...

Tim Fitzpatrick
1-3 %?

Pat McGovern
Yeah. That means that's a huge opportunity to get on the radar of your clients, customers, et cetera. That's why I'd be again putting my chips down.

Trade Shows and Websites

Pat McGovern

I'm going to wrap it up. Tim, I've got a few more here. I'm going to go pretty quick through this. In the B2B space, I know trade shows for many are an important channel. Prior to the pandemic, trade shows were diminishing value anyway. Maybe this is something people didn't want to talk about, but let's just face the fact. They're expensive. They take people out of the office for long periods of time. You lose that opportunity. You could argue at how effective these things even are. They were diminishing. Pandemic hits. Obviously, that's the nuclear bomb. Nobody's going to trade shows. Okay, now we're in 2023, things are coming back a little bit. My feeling is they're never going to come back to where they were post or pre-pandemic.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Pat McGovern
People are still going to be going to trade shows. But if I went to four in 2018, you know what? Maybe I'm going to do one, maybe two. People are going to be cherry picking. Organizations are going to be looking more and more carefully about which shows they're going to go to. As a result then, how do you get customers? As a result, I believe more organizations are going to be putting more effort into their website. Again, this goes back to what's happening. More and more younger people are coming into the space. They're going to be looking at the website first and foremost. And a lot of these in the B2B space, Tim, as you know, they're not too good. No one's spending any time giving it any love or attention. This is going to be more of an important channel. And because it's your 24 hours sales team, it's your 24 hours marketing channel, right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. The way I always think about websites, it is the hub for everything you do from a marketing and a sales standpoint. Even if you're a 100 % referral business, people aren't just picking up the phone or emailing anymore. They're going to your website first. What do you say? Do they like what they see? Does it instill confidence? From there they might go check out some of your social pages, right?

Pat McGovern
Yep.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Everything you do is driving traffic back to your website. It's got to communicate well, and it's got to have a solid experience.

Pat McGovern
Tim, let me throw something else at you. Let's talk about manufacturing, which is an area I spend a lot of time in. Yes, everything you said 100 % agree with. But you know what? Most manufacturers, when I talk to them, one of their biggest hot buttons, people. I can't get enough people. Okay, well, if you're trying to recruit people and they go to your website and they spend a little bit of time in there and they're in there finding broken links, outdated information, things are misspelled, what tone is that sending for? Why should I join this organization? Right? So if you're looking to try to get more people in your door trying to recruit better, spend some time on your freaking website.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. So, Pat, I just had Ryan England from Core Matters on the podcast, and he specializes in helping companies hire better people faster. And that's one of the things he talks about is marketing, right? You have marketing for people you want to recruit, but you also have your overall marketing, and your overall marketing supports and impacts your ability to recruit and find good people.

Pat McGovern
Right. To me, it's like going into a retail store and some of the lights are out.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right.

Pat McGovern
Or the door doesn't really open up right. It's like, well, do you want my business? It just sets a tone. It's the same thing with the website, right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
They go to the website, they're looking at reviews. If they see the owner of the company responding to reviews getting in a pissing match with somebody who left a bad review, we're not even going to apply, right?

Pat McGovern
Right. For sure. For sure. So that's why I think the diminishing of trade shows the importance of websites.

Copywriting

Pat McGovern

Number seven, Tim, the one skill to know, I believe this is overlooked, but the one skill is copywriting. I don't believe enough people in marketing are good copywriters, and I know we talked a lot about video and the importance of that. But a lot of times video needs a script. A lot of times video has just context underneath it. Copywriting is just a killer asset to have.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Salespeople

Pat McGovern
Finally, this is something that I've been observing, Tim, maybe you have seen this as well. More and more organizations I talk to, they're looking for bodies, they're looking for salespeople. They can't find good salespeople. Then I talk to people coming out of college, maybe people with one to five years of experience, you know what they don't want to go into? Sales. I think there's going to be a huge demand in the next 12, 18, 24, a five year stretch. You want to make some money in the space? Get good at selling. Again, I would just give that to anybody. Nothing happens until a sales made. If you can't sell something, it's just going to make your life a little bit harder. No matter what, ideas, concepts, you're always got to be thinking about, how do I understand the person who I'm talking to at the other end, and how do I convince him or her that I've got the right idea or that we should go down this way? It's a skill that's being lost. I think people have got the idea of it is, hey, it's too much Sleazy car man. It's too much sound insurance. It's too much door to door type of thing, as opposed to how do I help other people? Sometimes that's through my product, a lot of times it's not. So I think there's going to be organizations opening up that are just focused on delivering more sales people to B2B firms. Again, we talked about the fractional CMO. I could see a chief sales officer that comes in as well. Tim fFitz, that's what I got. Those are my eight things to be looking out for in the next...

Conclusion

Tim Fitzpatrick
Love it, man. You dropped some serious value there, Pat. Any last minute thoughts you want to leave us with?

Pat McGovern
I don't have any last minute thoughts. I left it all on the field. Tim, if anybody wants to reach me and follow up with me, you could do it on LinkedIn, Pat McGovern, on LinkedIn quite a bit or p.mcgovern@ascedia.com.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. Yeah, we'll make sure those go in the show notes. Please connect with Pat. I've had a pleasure connecting with you multiple times now, so I appreciate you doing that. You know what? I'm going to pull out one thing that you said. Yeah. I'm trying to leave with people because I think it's super important. When you were touching on AI, you talked about speed of execution. To me, speed of execution in business is super, super important. The faster we can execute, the faster we can learn and we can iterate. I'm taking that as your thought. Speed of execution, don't lose sight of it. So super important. Pat, thank you so much, man. I appreciate it. Those of you that are watching, listening, appreciate you doing so as well. You can always connect with us over at rialtomarketing.com. Happy to chat with you. You can Book a Free Discovery Call over there. The other tool that I always talk about is over at RevenueRoadblockScorecard.com. We help clients remove nine of the common revenue roadblocks so that they can get where they want to go faster. If you want to know which of the nine are slowing down your growth, go check out RevenueroadblockScorecard.com. So, Pat, thank you. Until next time. Take care, guys.


Connect with Pat McGovern


Links From The Episode

  • pmcgovern@ascedia.com

About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

Tired of marketing that doesn't deliver? Ready to create lasting marketing success?

The world of marketing is vast and constantly evolving. It's easy to fall prey to information overload and feel lost in the marketing maze. In this ever-evolving landscape, expert guidance is critical to navigate successfully.

We understand - marketing your business can be more than just challenging; it can be downright disheartening. But it doesn't have to be. Marketing shouldn't be difficult.

Limited returns on your marketing efforts? Unsure about your next move? Or perhaps you're doing all the "marketing stuff," but it's not working.

This is where our expertise comes into play.

We provide marketing consulting, advisory, and outsourced or part-time marketing executive services. We help MSPs & B2B professional service firms build and manage their marketing engine to get where they want to go faster.

Ready to remove your revenue roadblocks and simplify marketing? It's about time you feel confident in your marketing strategy. Let us help.