Attract & Keep Customers For Life

February

8

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How would you like to have a proven, step-by-step process to develop your brand, build trust with customers and prospective clients, and be looked upon as an expert in your industry? Sounds pretty good, right? Stay tuned, because our special guest Terry Begue - Speaker and Author from Begue Painting is going to share this with us today.

Join Terry Begue and Tim Fitzpatrick for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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Attract & Keep Customers For Life



Tim Fitzpatrick
How would you like to have a proven step by step process to develop your brand, build trust with customers and prospective clients, and be looked upon as an expert in your industry. Sound pretty good, right? Well, stay tuned. We are going to dig into this with our special guest today, and we're going to talk about how to attract and keep customers for life. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. I want to thank you so much for tuning in today. I am super excited to have with me, Terry Begue from Begue Painting. Terry, welcome. And thank you so much for being here.

Terry Begue
It's great being here, Tim. I'm excited and looking forward to having a talk with you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, me too. You have a very interesting background. We're going to dig into that here in a minute. But before we do, I want to just ask you some rapid-fire questions to help us get to know you a little bit. You ready to jump in with both feet here?

Terry Begue
I'm ready. Bring it on.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. When you are not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Terry Begue
Usually it's with my family. My daughter lives just a mile from us. We become empty nesters, and my son lives in Arizona. But I'm going out to see him next week. So, being with family.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's your hidden talent?

Terry Begue
Hidden talent. That's a tough one, I think. And this always comes from my wife. And she says you can connect with anybody, whether it be someone working on your paint crew that didn't even attend high school or a PhD. So it seems like you're able to make friends. I'm able to connect with people kind of naturally. I don't know. That's what she tells me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's a great talent to have. What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Terry Begue
Best advice I was ever given is don't give up on your dreams. Life is not telling you, you can't have what you want. Maybe it's just saying you're not quite there yet. So that's been the big one for me, because sometimes we greatly overestimate what we could do in a year. But we greatly underestimate what we could do in five or ten years. So I look at a lot of things as more like a marathon than a sprint.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Terry Begue
That I wrote a book. The People from back home, because I barely got through high school. I passed English with Ds and the fact that they look at me and they go, "You're an author now? And you wrote a course. He goes, "How did you do those things?" So that's the big one. I think coming from where I came from. Doing things that I guess smart people do.

Terry Begue
Yeah. Some of the most successful people I know sucked at school. The formal education process is great for some people not so great for others, but whether you excel there or not is certainly not a huge determining factor in my opinion of where you're going to go in life and how much success you're going to experience, which leads me to the next question, what does success mean to you?

Terry Begue
To me, success is not necessarily about having a bulging bank account or a second home somewhere. It's knowing you could do what you want to do. It's freedom, I think. I could get up today and go pain if I wanted to. I could just be on podcasts all day. But I can pretty much I have the freedom to do what I want to do when I want to do it. And I think that's why a lot of people become self-employed just for that one thing right there. And I have it. It took me a while, but I'm there now.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's a phenomenal place to be. So Congratulations on that one. Where is your happy place?

Terry Begue
Oh, gosh. Again, I'm going to say when our whole family is together because like I said we split up a little bit. A few years ago, my son decided to move to Arizona, but we still all get together at least once a year. So the best place for me to be is knowing when I'm with my family and everybody's healthy.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Terry Begue
Trust is huge. I think of my employees I spent next to my wife and my kids is probably my employees that I'm around. And of course, there's just an unspoken trust with family. But with my crew, they know that trust is everything to stand behind what they do. So really, just being legitimate and transparent. I think those are the big ones. Transparency, I would say, is one of the top ones, which is one of the things that leads to trust. Probably one of the trust biggest qualities is transparency I think. It all focuses right around there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Now, one of the things I mentioned in the beginning here was that you have an interesting background. So you have a painting company that you've owned for years. How many years have you owned?

Terry Begue
This is my 43rd year.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, 43rd year in your painting business. So, dang, Terry, you are doing something right. Tell us a little bit more just about your background. What you're doing now? A lot of people might be going, "Terry is a painter. Why are you interviewing him, Tim? You're doing a lot more than that now. So tell us a little bit more about your backround and what you're doing in addition to your painting business at this point.

Terry Begue
Sure. As I mentioned earlier, I wasn't a bookworm, let's say, kind of a person I knew when I went to College, I did try it. It was the worst four weeks of my life. But once I got it, I knew the only way I wanted to have above-average income, and I knew the only other way I was going to do it if I can't get a degree is I needed to own a business. And when I started, I was an absolute train wreck. I just wanted to be in business. I was very independent, couldn't work for anybody, and I wouldn't let anybody show me anything. I had to figure it all out on my own. And it took me about ten years to get up to speed to where things finally made more sense and needed that motivation of my wife saying just three little words to me. It changed my life forever. And those were, "Terry, I'm pregnant." That's the true story. I mean, it's crazy because nothing changed in my life for those first eight years that we were married. But once she said that to me, it was like a switch had flipped in my brain. All of a sudden that lifestyle that I was providing for her was no longer going to be good enough. And I found ways to just get out of my comfort zone, start connecting with my customers. And I started reading books. The books behind. I read hundreds of books on the topic of entrepreneurship and how to connect with customers because I knew that was the key. Those first eight years, I looked at my customers as almost like they were the enemy. Either they hired me and I won or they didn't hire me and they won. But it wasn't until I learned that they were really the pathway to my success. Did things turn around for me when I started treating them like not just friends, but good friends and going out of my way for them and collecting testimonials and getting feedback and things about what they like and what they didn't like that things started to turn around for me, and I started getting so successful in my business. I mean, from the time my wife told me she was pregnant until we had our son just eight months later, I had already doubled my income. And over that next year I doubled it again, and I knew I was onto something big, and I created a process or a system for painting homes real quick. I had a crew. We were turning houses over in one day, knocking out sometimes two houses a day. And with that volume, it just seemed to go faster and faster, pick up more speed. It had its own momentum almost. And then people started saying, Other painters, "Hey, how are you doing that? Why don't you show us what you're doing?" And that's kind of where the idea of the book came from, helping other people to be where I am and not just painters, but anyone starting a business. It's pretty much the same thing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And what's the name of your book?

Terry Begue
My book is titled Attract and Keep Customers for Life. And what it's about the subtitle probably explains it better. And what that is is four abilities to build, trust, communicate your value, and charge what you're worth. And that's what changed for me. I learned how to communicate my value to my customers, and when they call me, they know I'm not going to be the cheapest and they know going in, but they still call me. Usually they never question my price and they use me over and over. They refer me to their friends. And because of that, I haven't advertised since 2012. You being a marketer probably think that's crazy, but I like being able to keep saying that I still turn away more jobs than I take every year. Even though I don't advertise anymore.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I want to dig into this a little bit. The first eight years of your business. What was that like? I mean, it sounds like you were doing something right because you were able to stay in business, but was your income inconsistent? Were you not making a lot of money? What did that look like?

Terry Begue
That was exactly it. I wasn't making a lot of money. The only jobs I was getting were the ones that the other painters didn't want. Or either that or I was the lowest bidder. And you start playing that bidding war like that. It's a race to the bottom, and that's where I was. I stayed in that place. I can remember even vacuuming the carpet for a guy once just to make an extra $20, and I couldn't figure out what was wrong. But like I said, I never really tried to learn. In the beginning, I just went through the motions. I reacted to life instead of creating the life that I wanted. And because it was such a big difference from where I was to where I am now really opposite extremes. I felt like this book has a lot of value because I share not just the successes, but the mistakes that I made, too. And what it came down to is learning how to sell the jobs. But I hated selling more than anything. And that's the reason for what I call the four abilities what they were. They were like soft selling skills that didn't feel like you were selling and the customer didn't feel like they were being sold kind of a thing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. That really speaks a lot to how bad you wanted this. You know, your tenacity and your persistence, because eight years in most people would have given up years before that. So kudos to you for that. And I admire you for sticking with it until you got to that place where you started to gain traction and see success, which leads me into the kind of the first question I want to ask you. You've been doing this for 40 plus years. What's the single biggest reason for your success?

Terry Begue
I may have already touched on it a little bit. I think it's realizing that your customers are the difference. They are the pathway to success. They don't need us. We need them. I own a service business and I'm going to people's homes. So trust is huge. And I would have to say, because my customers are the single biggest reason. The reason that they hire me if you want to take that little bit deeper is because they trust me more than anyone else. I have ten or twelve different tips in my book on how to build trust in a short amount of time. And it's a lot of little things because it's not right to judge, but we're still being judged all the time. Right. And it's those little things that matter. Like, are you there when you said you're going to be there? Do you do the things that you said you were going to do? It's just simple little things, but there's so many of them I have listed in this book. When you pull it all together, it's very powerful, each one by itself, not so much, but its abilities to make yourself more likable and credibility is important to it. And then getting into the most important one, which is the trustability.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I think so many of us overlook the simple things. To be extraordinary we don't have to do extraordinary things. We just need to do the simple things extraordinarily well, right? I think it was Jim Rohn that said something to that effect. And it's true, especially in the field that you are in. Look, there's a lot of contractors. That just what's the stereotype of contractors like. They don't call. They don't show up on time. I mean, it's unfortunate, but it presents a huge opportunity for people like you to see, look, gosh, if I call people back and show up on time and do what I say, I'm going to do. I'm differentiating myself.

Terry Begue
Yes, it really is. It makes a huge difference. I hear it every day and almost every customer that I call back, they usually come through my office here on answering machine. I want to say maybe five out of ten times, at least maybe more. They say I'm the only one to call them back, and that just blows me away because those people are paying for marketing. I'm fortunate enough, I don't have to advertise anymore. But people are paying for advertising, paying for marketing and then not following up and even returning phone calls. It just seems crazy to me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Seems crazy to me. But it happens all the time. You touched on the four abilities here the four abilities that you write about in your book. How did you come up with these four abilities? Why four? Not three or five or any?

Terry Begue
I had several people say, how do you do what you do? Could you break it down and turn it into a book? And when I started doing that, I started thinking about it. And really, what gave me the momentum to develop these abilities was, as I mentioned earlier, I hated selling. I had a friend in our family who was a used car salesman, and I just did not like that stereotype. I didn't want to sell, and I was horrible at it. But then I realized if I can find ways to make myself likable to my customer right off, that would be the first step. Then if I could find a way to make myself believable build credibility with them, because going from like to trust was just too big of a leap. So in between there I started working on building believability. And again, that's doing those little things right. A lot of little things. And then I thought, well, trust is really the golden ticket. If you could get to trust and so I started creating little things that you can do and say that will build more trust with your customers in a short amount of time. And then the final one was wow ability, which is more about getting referrals. I call it referrals on steroids when you can wow your customer, which is really just following through with everything you said you were going to do. And then a little bit more things. Like I give a lot of examples in my book of ways to wow your customers, like over promise and over deliver. Still, just by doing more, and it doesn't have to cost a lot of money to do a little bit more. But it goes a long ways in the customers mind.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I want to reiterate these four abilities again, being likable, being believable, being trustworthy, and then having what you call this wow ability. Can we dig deeper into each one of these a little bit? Can you give us some examples or some tips that are going to hammer each one of these four home for people?

Terry Begue
Tips. Okay, like, right off, the customer doesn't know me. They call me the way I build likability is say, I make an appointment to be there tomorrow at 4:30. Well, at about 4:15, I'll call and we have cell phones. It's so easy. I'll call and say, hey, I'm on my way. When I first started doing it, honestly, I did it for me more than for them because I want them to be there and be ready because I was so busy I didn't have time to wait for them to go find their shoes and then find their husband and get outside so we could look at the job. So I started calling and I found customers absolutely loved that, that I would call ahead. But even though I was on time, I still would call ahead and let them know that I'm on my way. Again, just a little thing. An example of believability would be something like when I was there, I would show them. I would give them a list of testimonials from other customers that are just like them. And that made me much more believable in the eyes, and sometimes they would even know the people. I've painted so many houses now in my area, I can usually point out houses to them. If I we're in a neighborhood like an allotment type and I could always show them work that I've done, that makes me believable. They could go to my websites another way, because it's covered with testimonials. I'm really big on those because other people's words are so powerful, hundreds of times more powerful than anything that we could say about ourselves. Right? Someone else says, and then an example of trust would be coming in at a price where I said I would be before I even got there. I gave him an idea. I usually try to give them a little bit of an idea. If I have an idea of the area, the type of home that they have, I'll ask them a couple of questions over the phone and that builds trust that I don't get there. Then throw out a number that's way, much higher than what I said at first. These are just quick ones. I just didn't want to overlap some of them. An idea of while ability I mentioned earlier over promise and over deliver. When we're painting someone's home, I always try to do something a little bit extra if it's outside, maybe the mailbox post or something simple that needs painted to match in that they don't ever think to say anything about or something they clearly missed. That's easy for you to do while you're there. Maybe there's the gutters need cleaned out if they're elderly, just little things like that, and that really does wow the customer. Another thing I do is what I call risk reversal is I tell them they go, what do you mean by that? And I say you take no risk by hiring me because I'm not going to turn a bill in. This might sound crazy to you, but I tell them I'm not going to turn a bill in until you tell me you're happy and they just look at me and they go, really? They don't believe I'm going to do that, but they're ready to write a check before we're even done. Usually because we do more than we say we're going to do, and we figured into the job enough to cover ourselves so we can do that. But that's just a couple of examples of what I mean call wow ability.

Tim Fitzpatrick
When you say that to people, are you collecting no deposit up front?

Terry Begue
I know that sounds crazy. A lot of them sign. There's a place they could sign my contract, my proposal, but I don't ask them to. I work on a handshake. I've painted over 5000 homes, and only one person has ever burnt me on that. And I'm thinking, if that's all it's ever going to burn me, I think I can afford to keep doing it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
This is awesome, because most people like you said, hear that and they go, oh, my gosh, this is crazy. But, you know, you have been doing this long enough. I can't even begin to guess how many projects you have picked up because you have that policy. Most people are afraid would be afraid to offer a policy like that. But you have enough data where, you know, the risk versus the reward is so small that differentiates you from every single one of your competitors that is out there. That is phenomenal. It actually reminds me of an example. This was Jose Palomino from Value Prop. I interviewed him a month or two ago, and I don't think he I can't remember whether we talked about this on the interview or we talked about it afterwards. But this is a clear example of what we call an element of value. It is a value that you can put out there that is going to help differentiate you from your competitors. And he talked about a customer of his. And I can't remember the exact details, but they sold, like, propane or heating fuel heating oil, that type of thing. And one of the things that he had worked with them on was they created a policy where if the customer ran out of fuel, they would go out there and fill it back up for free. It was something like that where most of their competitors would be like, oh, my God. How can you possibly do that? But they had a process in place that would notify them. When things were getting low, it was like, well, how often do people run out? And they're like, well, next to wever. So why don't you make that promise? And that's exactly what you're doing here is, hey, look, you're going to be happy. Otherwise you're not going to get a bill. Awesome.

Terry Begue
What I even say to my customers, they look at me and they go, really? And I say, how is the line? I have it down. I've said it so many times now because what I found is people aren't looking to beat you out of a paint job. They just want you to do what you promise. And when I say that to them, they go, yeah, that makes sense. And that is that's exactly what it is. They're not trying to bust you if you know what I'm saying.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. I like to think most people have good intentions. The vast majority of people out there would never feel good about having you paint their house and then saying, hey, thanks, Terry. I'm just going to go screw you. I'm not going to pay you.

Terry Begue
I'm not happy.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Come on. And frankly, you have other recourse that you can take. If that happens, we don't need to go down that path. I want to dig into this a little bit more, too. So we've got these four abilities. It seems to me like one, these abilities kind of go in line, right. You have to first be likable, then you can be believable, then you can be trustworthy, and then you can build this wow ability. But it also seems like when you put this down and actually thought this process out, it does give you a framework that you can focus on. So when you are working with or in communication with a potential client, it's top of mind the things that you can and should be doing throughout this process to lead them through these four abilities. Am I communicating that right now?

Terry Begue
Yeah. Absolutely. It's really easy. And like I said, I hated the feeling that I was selling a customer. But what I found when I did it like this. If I just tried to make myself likable and believable, it didn't feel like I was selling. It didn't feel a manipulative. And that's what really bothered me the most. And the customers were really comfortable with me that way, too, because I didn't push them. Even in the beginning, when I needed the job, I didn't. But now everything just flows so nice and easy. I don't ever have to worry about how many customers I'm meeting every week because we get 30, 40 houses booked ahead in the summertime here in Ohio and it's crazy. And I had to turn jobs away. I mean, we try now it's gotten to the point where we just do. I don't want to really start another crew. I could, but it's gotten to the point where we just do the very easiest jobs that are easiest for us. They pay the best in spraying aluminum sighted homes and cedar sighted homes, things that can be sprayed because we mask off everything and we get nice, straight lines. The owners just love our system. And a lot of times we're in and out in a day.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you only do very specific types of painting jobs.

Terry Begue
It wasn't always that way. But as the demand kept picking up and picking up, I went to two crews and almost started a third crew. But I'll tell you, I just wasn't comfortable with it anymore. I kind of lost touch with my customers a little bit, and I thought, no, I'd rather just back off and just do the ones that I want to do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, well, and it sounds like those are the jobs that, you know, you do great work. Your system is really dialed in for that. You know, the finished product is going to get the end results that they're looking for.

Terry Begue
And my crew, they do the same thing every day. They're so good at it. I don't even tell them what to do every day. They know the process, they know the system, and we just work our way around the house. It's just easy in and out.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I want to call this out because I think it's easy for people to just overlook what you're touching on here. You have a very clear understanding of who your ideal clients are.

Terry Begue
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
If you talk to people and they do not fall into that realm, you refer them somewhere else?

Terry Begue
I hate to say no to people, and I just did that today. I just referred a lady who had a wooden house. I painted it for about ten years ago. She just turned 100 today. This Lady I just was talking to. Awesome lady, too, and I felt so bad telling her that I just can't do it anymore. It's too involved. And we don't do those. But I gave her the name of another guy, and I'd already put he has already talked to her. So I hate to tell people no, without at least give him an option.

Tim Fitzpatrick
But it's just, you know, what you're good at and what you're not. And that makes your business far more efficient than most and more profitable. So this is one of the things that we dig into when we talk about target market. Every homeowner is not an ideal client for you. You know, very specifically, the types of homes where they are, what they're made out of. If they don't fall into that category, you already know that you're going to refer them out because it's just not a good fit for you. And you have a very successful business, even though you say no to very specific types of jobs.

Terry Begue
Yeah, I do. And again, I hate to tell them no without at least giving them an option or two something else that they can do. Their guys said no, don't do that. And I can't be like that to people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
If you really wanted to, you could be making referral fees off of those referrals. Some people love to do that. Some people just feel good knowing that they're getting somebody to somebody else that can take care of them. But, yeah, you are not losing business by focusing. You are actually doing more business because of that. And I'm calling this out because that is the biggest roadblock most people have. When you talk about honing in on specific types of ideal clients, they gosh, I'm going to lose business you have experienced this year in year out. That is not the case your business. If you wanted to continue to grow and do more volume, you could. But you've made the choice. I don't want to add in another crew. I don't want that headache. And that's the beauty of owning your own business. You're empowered to make that decision.

Terry Begue
Right. Yeah. I still love what I do. Even though I'm going to be 63 here in a month. I've still got a few more years in me, and I still love doing the same thing I did when I was in my 20s.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's awesome. 40 plus years. You've been doing this. If you could go back when you started your business and change one thing, what would that one thing be?

Terry Begue
Probably. I look at those first eight years, how bad we suffered and what bothered me more than me was my wife. I pulled her along there with me and I really had a hard time with that, so that would be the thing I would fix. I probably should have asked for help. Back then I was so independent I could figure it all out on my own. I mean, I went into the painting business and I really didn't even know how to paint. I had no skills, and I wish I would have maybe apprenticed with a painter at least for a couple of years, talked to more people. I tried to figure everything out on my own. I would have asked for help. I would have paid for some kind of training at least or taking a job with somebody and just learned the skills to begin with before even getting onto the business skills part. So it's been a long, slow process there for me, but I think I ended up in a good place because of it, but that would be the biggest thing I would do over is I would make sure I got the education, not necessarily in school for what I was doing but just to learn the skill of painting. But even more so, the skill of running a business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I talk about this very thing often in some of the interviews that I do. Where man, I struggle with that too. I still struggle with it from time to time asking for help. I think it is so easy for us to feel like, gosh, we're asking for help. We're showing weakness. There's vulnerability there, but it really shows strength and confidence that you can go to somebody and say, hey, I'm sucking at this or I don't know how to do this. I need some help. Can you help me? And I think there are so many people out there that want to help. They just need to be asked by somebody.

Terry Begue
Oh yeah. There's an organization now PCA, professional painting contractors, and everybody in there is so helpful and they're there to ask. I know when I started there was no Internet. But now they're checking. That's what I was saying. I used to call my customers even though they had no cell phones. I used to call from home or stop at a payphone. I say it shouldn't be that hard for people to make a quick call to the customer because we have cell phones now and be on time because we have GPS. So those excuses don't wash anymore. It's just things are a lot different now, but I think they're easier than the way they used to be a little bit.

Tim Fitzpatrick
There's no doubt about it. The communication tools, the access to information that we have now compared to what it was when you first started is night and day. We just need to be open and willing to look into these things and figure out how we can use them to benefit us and our clients.

Terry Begue
Yes. It just comes down to having a caring heart for your customers. I think because we all know a good customer service is because we all are customers, right? We know what we like and to be able to look at that the other way around and providing what they like is not that hard of a thing to do if you just kind of look at it from their perspective.

Tim Fitzpatrick
One of the things that you said that is still sticking with me was your example with wow ability, painting the mailbox post, even though that wasn't part of the job. Little things like that. When you were saying that I was just thinking I was like, Gosh, yeah, if that happened to me, I'd be like, Dude, thanks. That was so nice. They didn't have to do that. But they did it anyways.

Terry Begue
And it goes a long ways. That's what they remember.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Terry Begue
They don't remember the great job that they knew they were going to get anyways. They remember that little bit extra. Inside we clean the dust off the top of the ceiling fans that are always dirty and offer to change out light bulbs for the customer. We don't buy them. But if they have them there, we put them in. Again, just little things. And that's the stuff that they remember.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, because they didn't expect it.

Terry Begue
Right. Yeah, exactly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
They expected you to do a good job painting. But when you go above and beyond and they are aware of that, that sticks with people.

Terry Begue
Clean it up at the end. So few people do that. I tell the guys when we pull in, when I have a new person look at their yard right now. This is how it has to look when we leave. And usually we've had people tell us that you already look better after we left. Again, it's just a little thing. It doesn't take that much more time, but it makes a huge difference in the mind of the customer.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Terry, you've dropped some serious value today, and I really appreciate you taking the time to share your experience and what you've learned along the way. Any last-minute thoughts, words of wisdom you want to leave us with?

Terry Begue
Words of wisdom. I'm going to come back to that. The one thing that I learned is success is a process. Don't think of it. If you aren't having the success you expect in a few months, maybe it was never meant to be that quickly. I mean, most overnight successes took years of hard work and research and learning. Think of success in anything you try to do is more of like a marathon than a sprint. Life is not saying no, you can't have this. It's really just saying you're just not there yet. Keep pushing. That's what I would say. Keep going. Don't get discouraged. And if you do bounce back because you're getting there, and it will work as long as you keep pushing towards what it is that you really want.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, people want to dig more into your book Attrack and Keep Customers for Life. Learn more about what you're offering outside of what you're doing with your painting business. Where is the best place for them to go, Terry?

Terry Begue
If you look in the show notes, my name terrybegue dot com. That's it. I have a free download of I think seven ways to attract more business and get customers that don't cost a dime. A lot of those things we talked about today, they don't cost anything. That's all free stuff the way I look at it. So why not do it?

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I'm going to spell this out, Terrybegue. So it's T-E-R-R-Y-B-E-G-U-E. Terry Begue dot com. If you guys like what we've talked about today, Terry obviously knows what the hell he's doing and his work for him and his painting business, and now he's trying to share that with everybody else so that we can all benefit from it. Head on over to Terry Begue dot com. Check out his book. Check out some of the free resources he has there. Terry, thank you so much, man. I really appreciate it. I have learned a bunch. You've put some things at the top of my mind that I'm going to take advantage of. So thank you for that. And for those of you that are listening, watching, thank you so much for doing so. I really appreciate it. If you are struggling with your marketing, you're not quite sure what that next right step is for you to get from where you are to where you want to be, head on over to our website at rialtomarketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing dot com. Click on the Get a free consultation button. I guarantee you will get a ton of value from that call and walk away having some clarity on where you should be focusing right now to get to where you want to go. Thanks so much for tuning in until next time. Take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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