Content Marketing Secrets That Are Working In 2023

May

5

0 comments

Content marketing is nothing new, but how have things changed and what’s working with content marketing in 2023? Our special guest today, Danni White from DW Creative Consulting Agency, will share the secret sauce with content marketing in 2023. You don’t want to miss this discussion.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Danni White for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

Watch This Episode


Listen To The Podcast

Subscribe To The Podcast

Apple Podcasts
Spotify
Google Podcast
Stitcher
iHeart Radio

Read The Transcript Here


Podcast Transcription

Content Marketing Secrets That Are Working In 2023

Tim Fitzpatrick
Content marketing is nothing new, but how have things changed and what's working in content marketing in 2023? Our special guest today will share the secret sauce with content marketing in 2023. You do not want to miss this discussion. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult and you must remove your revenue roadblocks to accelerate growth. Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. I am really excited to have Danni White from DW Creative Consulting Agency with me today. Danni, welcome and thanks for being here.

Danni White
Thank you so much, Tim. I am honored to be here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I'm excited to dig into this. We're going to talk about a few things with content marketing that I think a lot of people haven't thought about, not a lot of people are talking about. Before we do that, though, I want to help us get to know you a little bit. I'm going to ask you some rapid fire questions. Are you ready to jump in?

Danni White
Yes, I'm ready to jump in.

Tim Fitzpatrick
When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Danni White
I like to spend my time traveling and reading. Those are my two favorite things to do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Reading anything in particular or just all kinds of stuff?

Danni White
I read all kinds of books, but right now I'm reading a book on prayer and I'm reading a second book simultaneously that is on basically business strategies. The prayer book is by Chris Hodges and the business strategy book is by Myra Golden.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. So if your business strategy doesn't work, you can pray.

Danni White
I mean, it takes both.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. What's your hidden talent?

Danni White
My hidden talent this was a good question. My hidden talent is that I can play the piano. I played the piano for six years as a kid, and I'm starting to get back into piano playing as an adult. So that's my hidden talent. Nobody knows that I can really play the piano, except for the people that taught me. But I like music.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you had a gap and you're.

Danni White
I had a very long gap. Very long gap.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Danni White
The best piece of advice... Gosh, I've been given a lot of good pieces of advice over the years, but I think the best one would probably be saying no is a complete sentence. And it's not just about... It's saying no to things that don't serve you, things that might not be in your zone of genius. It opens the door and makes space for you to say yes to other opportunities that fit you best. I think that's probably the best piece of advice that I continue to try to apply to this day.

Tim Fitzpatrick
This piece of advice is super appropriate for me because this morning when I was meditating, I used the call map, if you're familiar with that, and he was talking about unsubscribing from the things that aren't serving you. Not just email list that you're on, but all the other things in our life that aren't serving us.

Danni White
Yeah, there's so many other things that... Okay, do we really have to be the person that does this? Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Danni White
My age. I'm in my early 30s and no one ever believes me. So yeah, that's probably the biggest thing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Be thankful for that, right?

Danni White
Right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Exactly. gosh, I remember when I first turned 21, I was like, Oh, yeah. Gosh, they're carding me again. They're carding me. And now it's like, What? You're not going to card me just because I have gray hair?

Danni White
Right, exactly. Yeah, I still get carded to this day. So it's like, okay, I'm good with it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You have great genes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What does success mean to you?

Danni White
That's a good question. Success for me is being able to really fulfill my purpose in life, really knowing what that is and being able to use my gifts and talents and abilities, not just to work and serve my clients, but also to serve my community, serve my family, serve the people around me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Danni White
My happy place is on a beach all day, every day.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Anywhere in particular or just any beach you'll do?

Danni White
I love all of the Caribbean Islands, Jamaica, Belize, all of those places. I love any beach around Bahamas, any beach there would do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. And you're in Texas, right?

Danni White
Yes, I am outside of Dallas, Texas.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, cool. So going to the Caribbean.

Danni White
There's no real beach around here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, but going to the Caribbean for you, that's pretty not a bad flight, right?

Danni White
Not a bad flight. Two and a half hours, maybe, three hours at the most, and you're on an island.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Good for you. What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Danni White
My family is very large. My friend circle is very small. I think the qualities that I would value the most is loyalty, being honest, being able to serve each other, and also being positive and being full with joy, like being able to laugh and have a good time.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I like that. I'm always telling my kids it's not the quantity of friends you have, it's the quality of friends you have. And there are so many people that have all these friends, but dang, if they had to drop things to just come be there for you, how many of those people would actually be there?

Danni White
Yeah. I always tell people, okay, ask every so call friend that you have, ask them for $5 and see how many $5 bills you get.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. The friends I have, I can count on one hand.

Danni White
Yeah, it's just a handful. They're your ride or die people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
But I know if I asked them to be there, they would be there. And gosh, one of them I've known since I was four. And I'm almost 50.

Danni White
That's what you call a long term friendship.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Long time. I call them my brother from another mother.

Danni White
That's what they are. They are almost just as much as family. They probably are even closer to you than your family.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's crazy. So tell us a little bit more about what you're doing with DW Creative.

Danni White
Yes. So I've been in the digital marketing world for the last 10 to 12 years. I've served in different capacities at different companies. And I started my agency to really service small to mid sized businesses in the web design and branding space. That's primarily what we focus on. And then the subset of that is obviously content marketing and social media marketing are big subsets of that. We really want to help these small to mid sized businesses gain visibility. And by gaining visibility, they are able to increase their revenue. And that's our primary goal.

The Must Have Factor to be Successful with Content Marketing

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. So let's dig into it. Let's talk content marketing, right? So what are some of the reasons businesses should be producing more content? And why do they struggle with consistency?

Danni White
Okay, so the reasons businesses should be producing more content. One, customers' demands have changed so much, right? And they continue to change every day. Just the evolvement of social media, the evolvement of technology in general, being able to match your product or service to what customers need at that time. And I think a lot of times you're able to do that through content because if you think about it, people are either always in their email or always scrolling on some social media platform or reading a blog or watching a video or something like that. They're always consuming content. Why not it be content that you have created around information that your company is producing or product or service that your company is producing? I think companies struggle a lot and a lot of small to midsize businesses struggle because they don't have a real strategy in place. They think like, okay, we're going to wake up on Monday and we're just going to randomly write a random blog post. And then they don't do it for the next six months. And they wonder why no one actually read that blog post because it's a strategy around every piece of content that has to be put into place and it's the consistency. So let's say it's January and we're like, okay, everyone's pumped. It's the first of the year and we're going to produce all this content. It's in our heads and it might be on paper, but no one has actually assigned tasks to people to actually produce this content. The second struggle in organizations is they don't get everybody on board. I have even walked through this struggle in my previous company before I launched out and started my agency. Getting the C suite, getting your peers, getting people on board with the content that you're producing so that they share it and their audiences start engaging with the content. That's a very big struggle for a lot of agencies.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Isn't that so ironic, too, because it's like, Gosh, you're investing in this content. Why aren't you communicating this to the rest of your team so that you can leverage all these people that work for you to help promote it where it makes sense?

Danni White
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Strategy and planning are obviously near and dear to my heart as somebody that's a marketing consultant and an outsourced or fractional CMO. I always think of strategy like fuel and planning is the vehicles. What vehicles are we going to use? Too often with marketing, people select the vehicles before they figure out, do we have fuel for these things? And that's when you run into, and I'm sure you've heard this too, Danni, it's like, oh, well, we've done content marketing. It didn't work, or we did SEO, it didn't work. But ah, usually... Yeah, it's a lot of times with marketing, the vehicles you choose are important, but the sequence is equally, if not more important. And so they don't have a strategy, they don't have a plan. And then it becomes, let me throw spaghetti up against the wall and see what sticks. The other big roadblock I see, too, when people initially get into content marketing is, what am I going to what am I going to write about or talk about or do videos on? Which is so ironic to me because once you get into content production. There is no shortage of ideas.

Danni White
There's no shortage of ideas. No, there's no. I think a lot of times prior even to the strategy and the planning, it's really an understanding of your audience. Do you understand the people that you're talking to? Do you understand what life they're walking through? Do you understand where they're at in this their particular life? Where do they hang out online? A lot of times when clients come to me, let's use social media, for example. They're like, Okay, I want to do social media. What does doing social media mean in your world? Where do your clients hang out? Before we even get to content strategy and content planning and creating content and videos and all of that, before we even get to any of that, we have to take a step back and go and ask that client, Okay, let's do some market research. Let's do some audience development. Let's look at, Okay, where does your particular client hang out? Are they moms? Are they hanging out in Facebook groups? Are they hanging out on the soccer sidelines or wherever? Whoever your audience is, you have to find out where they hang out and they don't hang out in a million places at once. And I think that's also goes part to the budget question of where do we spend money at when it comes to content marketing? And a lot of times that's also like, let's just throw money at all these platforms and see what happens. And in some ways it's an experimentation, but in other ways it's just a waste of time and money because we don't want to sit back and do the actual work that matters, which is the planning and the development work. That's the work that really matters.

Tim Fitzpatrick
They're wasting time and money because they're not fishing where the fish are.

Danni White
Exactly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love the fact that you're... Again, it all goes back to strategy. And to me, everything from a strategic standpoint with marketing starts with your target market and your ideal clients. You have to understand them and what's important to them. You talk about where are they? We call this tool an ideal client GPS. It's a list. One of my mentors said success starts with a list. Well, where the hell are all these people? Let's spend the time to create an ideal client GPS. And when we do this, it depends on the client, but this could be 20, 30 pages of information in a Google Doc. Just where do your ideal clients hang out? I love the fact that you brought that up because the other thing we also need to understand to create effective content is we need to understand the customer journey. What's that experience that they have from the minute they start to think about whatever you do all the way through buying and doing repeat and referral business. You want to map the types of content or the topics of the content that you're producing to various aspects of the journey, do you know?

Danni White
Because the customer journey is constantly changing, the demands are different. Because there is so much information online, customers today are able to go and research before they even come to fill out a form on your website. I think it's a careful balance between just throwing a bunch of information at your ideal client and giving them the actual information that they can't get anywhere else but from. So I think it's a very fine line between the two.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Do you also see... You obviously want to put content out there that's going to be helpful for your audience, but there's also the credibility and authority building side of creating content. What are your thoughts on that?

Danni White
Okay. So the words thought leadership is like the big overarching category for this type of content, right? Yeah. And I think that too there's a balance between actual thought leadership that informs and educates and helps your audience and throwing your opinions into a blog post and calling it thought leadership. A lot of companies, they struggle to do thought leadership because it's not just throwing information out there. It's really taking a specific topic and carefully crafting your opinion and your process, creating your framework, maybe, if it's a topic that's that big, and then creating that and producing it for your audience and having case studies and having places where it's been proven. I think we say thought leadership and we tell companies to produce their content as thought leadership. I don't think you can get to a place of creating thought leadership content unless you've been leading up to this point with relevant informative content already. That could be a video that's produced every week by your chief marketing officer. That could be a blog post that is posted on your website and then distributed to maybe different syndication channels by your CEO, something like that. And then you evolve into thought leadership. I don't think it just happens.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It seems to me, too, that with thought leadership, it can't just be we're creating videos or we're creating blog posts. The executives within the company also need to be present.

Danni White
They need to be present.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Events, association events. I mean, whatever else it is, it's a multi pronged approach, isn't it?

Danni White
That's true.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's not just one thing.

Danni White
It's not just one thing that's very true. But also when you're going into these events, these people are actually on board with the strategy that you have put in place. That's where we get back to the strategy. Have we done enough informing and educating of our own internal teams to get them on board and to make sure that they're actually carrying out the right message and the right branding along with that to the audience that they're speaking to. Let's say that you are talking to the C suite and there are your CEO or your chief marketing officer, even your financial officer, those people, they are talking to a specific level of people because their title carries with it some type of authority. You want them to be on board with what your overall plan is. Now, what they talk about might be more aligned to their line of business or their line of work. But overall, you want what they're saying to resonate with audiences that might not even be in that room. That's what I think true thought leadership is. It's being able to change the minds of the general population of an audience and not just a very small focus.

PUSH THROUGH YOUR REVENUE ROADBLOCKS! 

Get the outside eyes and feedback you need to get on the right path with your marketing.

Gain clarity and understanding. You'll leave your discovery call knowing where to focus your marketing efforts right now to get the best return on your investment.

Why is Content Scoring Critical for Generating Results?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. Now, you talk about this concept of content scoring. Tell us a little more about that. What is it and why is it really important for the future of content production and generating results from the content that we invest in?

Danni White
Yes. Content scoring, in my book is a way to evaluate the performance of content. When we think about creating content or creating net new content, we're not just thinking about throwing content into a vacuum and just seeing what it spits out. We're thinking about, Okay, we're going to produce this content. We know our target audience. We know that this content... There's a high percentage that this content would resonate with. Then once this content is out there and we've distributed it, we know the distribution channels that it's going to go through, we are going to take a step back and actually evaluate the performance of this content. Did it actually accomplish the goal that we wanted it to accomplish? Whatever that goal is, if even the goal is to get 100 new likes on your LinkedIn profile, if that's the goal that you have set for your content, did it actually accomplish that? And if it did not, why? And that gray area where you're asking questions and digging deep into the data and trying to find out, okay, what actually worked and what didn't work and what can we do better next time, it helps to eliminate wasting time, wasting energy, wasting money and wasting your team on efforts that don't really matter.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. So we need to understand why we're creating certain pieces of content. That why is going to help dictate the metrics or the data that we'd like to attach to that to determine whether it's performing. Did I get that right?

Danni White
Yes, that's correct. So when you create and produce content, there should be some type of end result. We should be aligning KPIs to the content that we produce. Let's say that we are producing some type of long form content, and the idea is to use it for sales enablement or lead generation. Okay, how many leads do we want to generate from this content? And do we reach that number in the next two weeks? Do we reach it in three weeks? Do we reach it in four weeks? And if we don't reach it, what was the reason? Why did we not reach it? Is it because the content isn't good? Is it because the content is off brand? Is it because it's not in the right voice? Is it because it's not even reaching the right audience? All of these things come into play when you're doing the measurement. So that's what really content scoring is. Basically creating a chart and scoring your content accordingly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Are there any particular tools that you like to use that help you track the performance of the content?

Danni White
I think one good tool that we've used in the past is Market Muse. Market muse is, and I'm not getting paid by Market muse to promote them in any way, but Market muse is a tool that you can use to evaluate your content in alignment with competitor topics. Let's say that you are writing about the importance of content marketing, and I'm sure there are thousands of other blogs and articles and websites that are talking about that same topic. But are you the most comprehensive? Do you give the most valuable information, the most relevant information? And does that allow you to rank or compete with your top three or top five competitors? Market Muse helps to evaluate that type of information.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Do you guys use Google Analytics to track content as well?

Danni White
We do use Google Analytics for larger, I guess you would say, for larger websites that are regularly producing content. If it's a smaller site in which they're not really producing content on a regular basis or they're just producing content on social media, then we'll use the social media evaluation tools like social media, Instagram, Facebook, they do have reporting built in. And we'll use that to measure, okay, did this post resonate with your audience? Did it not? Should maybe we be doing a video on this post if it got X amount of clicks or X amount of shares, things like that to keep the funnel going, so to speak.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, got it. So most important thing is we need to understand, to content score effectively, we need to understand why we're creating the content, what our goals are, and that's going to dictate what metrics we choose to track, and that's how we're going to score.

Danni White
Yes, exactly. In our company, we have basically a red light yellow light green light system that we use where we have three scoring metrics. Of course, green light is if the content did really well and it met the KPIs, the goals that we are wanting to reach. If it did, then we go and do the next step in terms of recommendations. Should we build out a full funnel based upon this content? Is there an email sequence around the corner on this content? Things like that. Yellow light is content that it met some of the KPIs but didn't really meet all of them. We're not really happy with the results. That's where we go back to the original content piece, maybe, and look at, Okay, that's where we start asking the questions. Why did not it work? Are we reaching the right audience, really? Maybe we need to finess that a little bit. Maybe it's not the right piece of content, things like that. Red light is where we're completely failed. It's a complete fail, you need a complete do over. That's exactly, crash and burn. Sometimes there are clients that can be relatively difficult, and they are sold on the fact that this piece of content is going to work.They've not tested it yet, so you put it out to the audience and it actually fails. That's where we go back and say, okay, audience development needs to happen, market research needs to happen. We need to determine what your audience actually wants, not what you want to sell them. And then backwards into that to create new content that actually matters to the audience. Because at the end of the day, you can create content all day long. If nobody watches it, if nobody reads it, if nobody cares, you're not going to sell and you're not going to make generate revenue. It's a very strategic process and sometimes people think it's a very lengthy, unnecessary process, but it really isn't. Content is something that it really controls the world. People are continuously consuming content of all kinds. And the way you present yourself in terms of creating content, the way you present your brand, the way you present your product, that's what they're going to remember you as. So it really does matter.

Tim Fitzpatrick
A lot of us are in very competitive spaces. If we're only focused on organic, for those we show up naturally, we're not paying to be there. What kinds of things would you share with people? How do I compete against larger competitors? Maybe they have paid budgets. How do we compete?

Danni White
For competition, this is what I always tell people. Consistency is what really matters. So if you find out that your competitors are showing up X amount of times a day, every day, you look at the content that they are producing and you're not producing that content organically, that's where you want to start. It really does start with a heavy competitor analysis, which is real easy to do. If I were to go to Google.com and incognito screen and type in any range of topics, I would see my top 10 competitors that are showing up for that topic. I would see the volume, I would see the type of keywords that they're ranking for. I can easily go to those websites and do a review of what type of content are they producing, how long is the content? I can even look in a tool like SEmRush or Ahrefs and find out how many people are coming to that piece of content in a given month or given quarter. I can do my own internal analysis, and then I can look at what I'm creating or not creating and create a list of, Okay, this is what I need to be doing. This is what I'm not doing and I need to start. I don't see competitors doing this, so maybe this is something that I can experiment with. That's the 10 to 15 % of testing and throwing things against the wall and seeing if it sticks. The other 80 %, 85 % should be actual things that have proven themselves to work. I personally always air on the side of organic. I do limited paid media just because a lot of small to mid sized businesses, they don't really have the budget to do a heavy paid media campaign. And so you can throw $25, $50, $75 here and there on paid media, but it's not really going to get you a lot of the results that you want. You typically need a larger budget. You typically need a more long term budget, months at a time to actually see some type of result. And that's why I would tell people, focus on organic. If you're doing everything that you can do on organic, you should start to start seeing some results. That's creating evergreen content, making sure you have a proper email marketing sequence. You're sending out your newsletters every month. You're growing your social media following, like posting whatever your cadence is for posting, creating content that resonates with your audience on social media, making sure you're also on the right social media platforms. I think a lot of times, especially in B2B, a lot of times we get caught up in like, okay, we need to be on every single platform that exists and your clients are not there. It does not matter. So if you are selling servers and you're trying to reach engineers and they don't exist on TikTok, you're creating videos on TikTok is totally irrelevant. And then also just building a community, building a community of loyal followers. That could be in a LinkedIn group or Facebook group. That could be on social media. That could just be people who always share your content, who refer your product or service to other people. There are a lot of organic ways to do that. And then also link building, like focusing on making those connections with relevant magazines, relevant publications, things that are related to you, reaching out to peers like you and I are talking. We're both in the marketing space, right? Reaching out to peers and creating those connections and relationships. It feels like a lot of work sometimes, especially if you're a small to midsize business. But again, once you create the strategy and you create the plan and you have, okay, Monday through Friday, I'm doing these three things to elevate my organic marketing, over time, you'll start to see results.

Tim Fitzpatrick
We were talking a little bit before we went live that it's a lot of work. There is no silver bullet. Content takes time, and if you don't want to do it yourself, it's going to take money. So that's just the reality of it. And I love the fact that you've talked about consistency. You can't create content and expect that two months from now, everything's peaches and cream. It's just not how it works. It's a long term investment. It's a long game. But I think it's a game that a lot of us should be playing in.

Danni White
It's a game worth playing because that's where people are. People are consuming content every single day. It's just a matter of are they consuming your content or not?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yours or your competitors?

Danni White
Someone's content. Are they consuming you or are they consuming someone else? I think a lot of clients are looking for a silver bullet. They're looking for the easy way to do things. They're looking for the fastest way to do things. And I think no shade to social media, but I think social media has messed up the idea of this microwave type of consumption and type of results. And long term results take time. Every good thing takes time. So I think it's the patience and the consistency and having a plan and working that plan. It works if you work it. That's the thought process.

How ChatGPT is Impacting Content Marketing

Tim Fitzpatrick
So, Danni it's hard for us to... I can't end this conversation we're having unless we talk about ChatGPT. Everybody's talking about it. So why not you and I? I think a lot of business owners see ChatGPT as, Oh, my gosh, I can easily create all my content, and I don't need to worry about paying somebody on my staff to do it or paying an agency like yours to do it. What are you seeing with ChatGPT right now? And obviously understanding that it's evolving very quickly.

Danni White
Yes, it is. Definitely evolving. What I do see with ChatGPT right now that can be useful for marketing agencies and people who are trying to elevate their marketing work and even put into more efficiency and more productivity. It can definitely help from the content side on prompts. If you give it a keyword or a couple of words, it can give you prompts for writing new content. It can actually write a first draft of content for you, which if you're pressed for time, having that initial copy can actually help you. Now, you can't go just publish what ChatGPT writes. It's machine, it's not a human. It does take some editing and finessing and making sure that it matches to your brand and tone. But I think it can be useful in terms of producing content. If you give it a prompt, even for social media, it can write social media captions. We've done some testing on that, too, where we will give it a prompt for social media or for an image that we're creating or a video, and it'll produce a caption. I think where the work still comes in is that it doesn't yet have a good handle on brand and tone and voice. You can tell that a robot has written it or a very beginner entry level writer has written it. That's where a lot of the finessing of the content will come into play. I think as artificial intelligence continues to speed up and it's fed the machines are fed more data, I do think that there is the opportunity for companies to include their brand voice and brand tone in feeding that as a data element into the artificial intelligence machine. I think that is probably a next level thought pattern that could happen in the future. But still, I don't air on the side of it will totally eliminate writers. It will never.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I don't think so either. But like you said, I think right now the biggest benefit is just efficiency. It can help do some of the initial work that needs to be to be done, and then you can come in and do your fine tuning and tweaks, but it can save a lot of time upfront. The other thing that I find, too, with it is the input determines the quality of the output. What you put in those prompts is really, really important. I'm starting to see, and I haven't played with it enough, but there are people that are actually sharing their prompts. I saw a video the other day, this guy had created a prompt to help create buyer personas. It's pretty cool. Again, there's going to be some massaging that you have to do with that. But gosh, to think about using a prompt like that and starting with a base that you can then work from and fine tune, man, for some of us, that can save a significant amount of time.

Danni White
Yeah, that's true. I do think that it is a tool for efficiency. In the bio persona example, if you're a person that is willing to do that type of work, but you just need a foundation and you could then take it and run with it, I think that ChatGPT is going to eliminate a lot of the entry level research, entry level content development type of roles, and it's going to allow human beings to do that next level thinking and next level creation, next level production. I do think that it serves as that type of foundation. And as long as you're not lazy and you're able to take that information and then build upon it, I think it could help you to create some good content and be able to create content that you can repurpose as well.

Conclusion: Content Marketing Secrets That Are Working In 2023

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it. It's been a great conversation, Danni. Any last minute thoughts you want to leave us with today?

Danni White
Content is hard. It's not easy. But I will say that consistency does make a difference. The person that creates the most relevant and informative information is the person that wins in the end. That's the company that wins. That's the brand that wins. And that's the company and brand that will stay memorable for readers and for people and for audiences in the future. So be patient, get a strategy in place, know your audience and be consistent with it. I think that's what I would say.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Speaking my language, Danni. Where can people learn more about you?

Danni White
So, yes you can visit our agency website. It's DWCreativeConsultingAgency.com. You can find out more about our services there. You can also connect with us on Facebook and Instagram and LinkedIn as well. Then I also have a podcast that focuses on digital marketing for small to midsize businesses. You can go to that website, download and subscribe to that podcast as well. It's called hashtagsandhabits.com.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. For those of you that are listening, we'll make sure that that stuff gets in the show notes. But dwcreativeconsultingagency.com, you can also check out hashtagsandhabits.com. Danni, thank you so much for taking the time. I really appreciate it. I have enjoyed the conversation.

Danni White
Thank you, Tim. This was awesome.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I know the folks that are watching or listening have as well. Those of you that are watching and listening, thank you. I appreciate you. We've been talking about content marketing. To me, content marketing falls a lot heavily into that lead generation side of things. Lead gen is one of the nine revenue roadblocks that we help clients remove. If you want to find out which roadblocks are slowing down your growth, you can find out over at revenueroadblockscorecard.com. You can also always connect with us over at our website at rialtomarketing.com. Thank you. Again, till next time, take care.


Connect With Danni White


Links From The Episode


About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

Tired of marketing that doesn't deliver? Ready to create lasting marketing success?

The world of marketing is vast and constantly evolving. It's easy to fall prey to information overload and feel lost in the marketing maze. In this ever-evolving landscape, expert guidance is critical to navigate successfully.

We understand - marketing your business can be more than just challenging; it can be downright disheartening. But it doesn't have to be. Marketing shouldn't be difficult.

Limited returns on your marketing efforts? Unsure about your next move? Or perhaps you're doing all the "marketing stuff," but it's not working.

This is where our expertise comes into play.

We provide marketing consulting, advisory, and outsourced or part-time marketing executive services. We help MSPs & B2B professional service firms build and manage their marketing engine to get where they want to go faster.

Ready to remove your revenue roadblocks and simplify marketing? It's about time you feel confident in your marketing strategy. Let us help.