Create Time, Reduce Errors & Scale Profits

March

4

0 comments

As business owners, many of us dream of building a profitable business that works without us. Yet, most business owners end up getting trapped (or stuck on the treadmill) in their businesses instead. What’s the solution? Stay tuned. In 2016, David Jenyns from Systemology successfully systemized himself out of his business at the time. We will dig into the details of his experience so you can do the same for yourself. 

Join David Jenyns and Tim Fitzpatrick for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

Watch This Episode


Listen To The Podcast

Subscribe To The Podcast

Apple Podcasts
Spotify
Google Podcast
Stitcher
iHeart Radio

Read The Transcript Here


Podcast Transcription

Create Time, Reduce Errors & Scale Profits



Tim Fitzpatrick
As business owners, many of us have this dream of building a profitable business that runs without us. Yet most of us never reach that point. We get trapped. We get stuck on the treadmill, and we're just stuck in our business. What's the solution? I want you to stay tuned. In 2016, our special guest successfully systemized himself out of his business. We are going to dig into his experience so you can do the same thing for yourself. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. I am super excited to have with me, David Jenyns from SYSTEMology. David, welcome, and thank you so much for taking the time to be here.

David Jenyns
Pleasure, Tim. I've been looking forward to this episode.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. And so people can tell right away from your accent, you are in Australia. We were joking earlier that you're in the future.

David Jenyns
I always like to tell people that the future looks bright.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. There you go. I love it. I am excited to dig into this. Systems are to me, I don't know how you can run a really successful business without having systems in place. So I'm excited to dig into this. Before we do that, I want to ask you some rapid-fire questions to help us get to know you a little bit. Are you ready to jump in with both feet here?

David Jenyns
Yeah. And I'll just keep it snappy. Is that the plan here?

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's totally fine. If you go on a little bit, that's totally okay, too. So when you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

David Jenyns
Family time, as much as I can. I'm also a big lover of jiu jitsu, Brazilian jiu jitsu and love doing anything outdoors, especially because it's summer here in Melbourne, Australia. So now is the time to be at the beach.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's your hidden talent?

David Jenyns
Hidden talent would be making complex things simple and logical. I'm quite good at breaking it down to the core essence and steps.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It reminds me what's the quote? Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. I believe it was Leonardo Da Vinci that said that. It is so easy to make things complex. It is much harder to break them down and make them simple. So that is a fantastic talent. What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

David Jenyns
I have always been a self development junkie. So I love Jim Rohn. And he used to say, work harder on yourself than you do on your job.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

David Jenyns
I used to say it was my age. People would look at me and go, "Wow, you don't look like you're older than 13." But I think as I'm getting older now, that's changed. So I'm 40 now, so I think I look young for my age, but I might start to look 40 now.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You know what, dude? I don't think you look 40. So I'm in my late 40s, and people can tell because my hair is now more gray than brown. So as long as you can hold that off, I think you're going to be in good shape. What does success mean to you?

David Jenyns
Success is about freedom to choose. Like, it's okay to work long hours. It's okay to work not many hours. It's okay to work in your business or on your business, but it really needs to be up to you to choose.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

David Jenyns
I would say at home, hanging out with the kids, just playing in the backyard. That's probably where I feel most at ease and comfortable.

Tim Fitzpatrick
How many kids do you have?

David Jenyns
I've got two. They're quite young, too. I've got a seven and a four year old.

Tim Fitzpatrick
They grow up fast, so enjoy the time. What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

David Jenyns
There's a bunch, but the one that comes to mind is just open, honest, clear communication. I feel like communication is at the heart of what's important to me when I'm spending time with someone. Understanding comes from that clear communication.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Tell us a little bit more about what you're doing at SYSTEMology. We are going to get into your background a little bit more, but just tell us your back story a little bit and what you're doing with SYSTEMology, and who you're working with.

David Jenyns
I got really interested. Like, I've got the deep affinity for business owners and how hard they work, how challenging it is to build a business. Being a business owner, I kind of feel it really deeply, and I feel like they are superheroes in all of the work that they do, and they're quite the unsung hero for what they do for communities and the teams that they work with. So I always have that connection. And I realize there's a huge problem that a lot of business owners struggle with, and it's that whole idea of most business owners can't step away from their business for more than a day or two and have it sort of collapsed in a screaming heap. So what I do is I help business owners identify best practice, extract that knowledge, get it organized in a central place where they can then start to delegate some of those responsibilities. So they built a profitable business that works without them. It's really that bridge. And I think I wrote SYSTEMology almost as, like, my own therapy session. It was kind of like he was the book that I wish I had when I was going through that journey with some clear steps. So that's a big part of the work I do is helping business owners step out of their business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Let's dig into it. So I know I touched on this a little bit in the intro. In 2016, you worked your way out of your business, so you fired yourself. You hired a CEO. Went to the beach and you increased your bottom line at the same time. How did you do this?

David Jenyns
Well, I've always had a sense that systems were important and core, just like you said at the start, that they're critical for running a great business. Scaling and growing, building out a team, all those things. So we kind of intuitively know that. But I had a real sense for that. I used to be in the stock market education space, so I was familiar with building trading systems, and that's effectively a system that someone would follow to remove emotion. We used to own a rock and roll clothing music store that we franchise. We're actually modeling off Hot Topic out of the US. We're kind of doing the Australian version of that out here and we got some store. I'd seen systems and processes work, but for some strange reason, the last business that I was in, which was my digital agency, Melbourne SEO Services, I got stuck in that business for probably about, I would say ten years too long, where I get figured out and thought I was the guy. How could I write systems for Google when Google's updating every second week? Things are changing. We're a creative digital agency. I was worried that the team wouldn't follow the systems and the processes. So I really got locked into this business, even though I knew at my core that systems were important. For some reason, I thought, this business is different than everything I've ever done before. And then I got trapped in there. And it wasn't till we found out that we were pregnant with my first child. And my dad was an entrepreneur as well. And he was always busy, always working morning, evening, weekends a lot. And I remember thinking to myself at that point in time when we got pregnant, where I was stuck in Melbourne SEO, I thought, I don't want to be that dad. I don't want to be too busy to walk my son to school, to play catch, to do all that sort of stuff. So I thought, I need to change here. And I really just had that was kind of the turning point for me. And then I went on a journey looking at, well, how do you remove yourself from a business? I knew systems are important, but again, it was like, how do you do it? I've read the EMyth, Traction, Built to Sell, Scaling Up. All of these books, they talk about systems, but they didn't say where or rather what were the steps to do it. So through about a period of nine months, I had a lady who was working in the business. We identified her that she'd make a great CEO. We kind of elevated her up. I worked closely with her to extract the IP out of my brain and some of the key team members, and she ended up moving into that position. And we had the birth of our first son. And I took about a year out. There's still some hey days kind of overseeing and helping. I mean, realistically, it probably took closer to probably about twelve to 18 months to kind of really get it rocking. But then she ran that business for three years with very little input from me until the point at which she had some changes in her personal life. She had to move back to the US and I had to make a decision on what I was going to do with that business. So I sold that business because I was like, "Oh, I don't want to get pulled back into that business." And systemology was really starting to take off. And that was kind of like the closing of that chapter. But what I've bottled is how I went from that transition of being the bottleneck to getting someone in to capturing, to delegating, to taking some time off and watching the business grow.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You touched on something that I think is where a lot of people struggle, which is especially people that are selling their expertise as the main service for their business. Is that IP that is in our heads as a business owner. Can you systemize that IP at some point or is part of that transfer or that change just teaching somebody else that IP so that they can do the same thing that you do? Does that make sense?

David Jenyns
Kind of comes down to this idea of when you're thinking about systemizing a business, where do you start? Because you got so much IP going on up there and you need to kind of think it's the starting point. Actually, in the systemology book, I do what's called the critical client flow, you identify the target market, you get very clear on the primary product or service that you're selling to that target market. That is the gateway product or service to the rest of your product line. So basically, what is the first thing that you sell to your target audience? That could be the smallest possible piece of everything that you do, that you can make a little profitable segment of your business, like a little micro business that sits underneath your big business, and you go to work on just that piece and you figure out how are we grabbing the attention of the target audience? How are we selling them? How are we onboarding? How do we deliver that core product or service? How do we hand over and then how do we kind of move them into our other products and services? But just capturing that piece is an idea of where do you start? And you're right, it is. It's about capturing what's currently being done, not what you'd like to do, but what's currently being done. Get it out of the heads of the key team members. Oftentimes it is the business owner, if they're heavily involved in the delivery of the product or service and then developing a way of doing things that can then be passed on. Sometimes it depends on the service as well. Like, some people go, "Oh, I just can't imagine that happening." You can still customize everything around the magic that you bring. Let's say if you're doing a fancy logo or editing a video or something like that, you can still systemize the heck out of how you're onboarding a client, how you're invoicing a client, how you're managing expectations and sending them different milestone updates. There's a bunch everything around the magic that you do, you can systemize. At some point, you will also bottle that magic and pass it on. But it's kind of like this staged process you go through.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. So one of the things you touch on here is the seven myths of business processes. And why do most people fail at systemization? Can we dig into this a little bit?

David Jenyns
Yeah. So I'll whip through all of the seven myths and then there might be some that really stand out for you because you know the listeners so much better than I do. You might go, yes, they feel this. There are often times a bunch of reasons why a visionary creative or a founder or a business owner, they don't end up systemizing their business. And oftentimes it's because they might not be the detail-oriented process, systems thinker like they're their visionary creatives. They don't like detail and process. And everything that they've done to build up their business to this point in time has been reinforced. Whatever needs attention, they go to it and fix it. They're the night in the shining armor. They're just doing everything. They're solving every problem. Anytime anyone needs anything, just chat with the business owner. They know the answer and that's helped them grow it to one size. But then a lot of these habits is actually what holds them back, as we know, moving to the next size. So the myths here, firstly, talk about these in the SYSTEMology book. There are hundreds of systems that you are going to need to document. That's the first myth. People think when I systemize a business, they go, "Oh. If I think about McDonald's, I think about their big thick manual or subway or something like that." They have all of these thick process manuals that detail every facet of the business. And then they think, I'm going to need hundreds of systems to systemize my business before it's systemized. And then that just becomes all too hard, all too complex. I'm not going to worry about it. But the truth is you might only need ten to 15 systems and it's the whole 80 20 we have to find, what are the 20% of the systems that deliver 80% of the results? So that's the first one. The second one is that business owners are going to have to be the ones that do it all. There's a myth that the business owner thinks well, I know how to do all of this. The IP is trapped in my brain. I'm busy enough as it is. I'm not going to have enough time to document my systems and processes. That's just another thing that will sit on my to do list. The truth of the matter is, depending on the size of the team and if you've got some team members around you, some of them already know how to do tasks to a really good standard. So just capturing what is currently being done not what you would like to have done and getting everybody just operating at that level can bring tremendous wins. So that would be the second myth. The third myth is that creating systems is time-consuming. Again, it's just this all of the preconceptions around what you think a system is. You might think the system has a flow chart and it's got detailed bullet points and subbullet points and it's got videos and step by step and it handles all the different variations. Now you've got this picture in this head that it's one epic thing and when really it might be simplified down and the first version of a system might be a Loom recording of you issuing out an invoice to someone through MYOB. So it's a disconnect between the reality of what systems are and how they start with what they think they should be. And the fact is creating systems, it's not time-consuming, it can be quite quick. The next myth is that you're going to need some sort of complex system or software package or something like that to run these things, whether it's a project management platform. Some people just use something as simple as Dropbox or Google Drive and they have a folder where they've got a collection of documents. And as a starting point, that's okay. Like over time, as the team grows, you might come across some limitations. But in the first instance you want to reduce friction and complexity because any additional friction and complexity slows down, the adoption rate, slows down. Getting the buy in from the rest of their team again make things as simple as they need to be. The next myth is that your team won't follow the systems. People say, what's the point of creating a system if my team's not going to follow it anyway? Like I've got a creative digital agency and part of our magic is we're all creative and I don't want to come in and say you must follow this system and process. And oftentimes that's a projection of the business owner projecting it into other team members and they think because I wouldn't follow process, they're not going to follow process. But A players and great team members depending on how the system is structured and as long as there's room for intelligence and thought and A players actually love systems because it outlines how they can succeed or how to do something successfully. So there's actually a little bit of a mismatch there. The myth being your team won't forward the systems. The truth is, depending on how they're presented, they most definitely will. In fact, some of them will love it and thrive with it. And then the last two myths, one is that systems remove creativity is a common one where people feel like if I go down step by step, line by line, you got to do this, you got to do that. We're just making robots. And there are certain things in a business that need to just happen. So having those things just happen and allowing people that have to do the creative thinking to focus on the creative thing and not have to worry about all of the other stuff actually makes them more creative. So in our video production business, we put a whole bunch of process in place around the way that kits were packed before you go on a shoot, how footage was ingested when they came back to the studio, all of this stuff that kind of just had to happen. And by doing all of that, it meant the videographer could think about how do I get the right shot here? How do I line things up? What performance do I want to get out of the actor or the people on the camera? So actually, systems, when done correctly, will increase creativity because it creates space, and space is where creativity comes. And the last one I've got here and I know there's a lot here, so we can dig into some of these. The last one is that you need a systemize like McDonald's. A lot of people think that McDonald's is the poster child of systemization. So we should do this. And they look at what McDonald's is today, which is a hamburger business that has been in business for 60 plus years, and they've systemized the heck out of everything. And they want to take 15 year old kids off the street and have them flipping burgers. They think that's how I should systemize my service business, where I'm hiring intelligent people that have a certain amount of knowledge when they join. And we're not selling hamburgers. And they're trying to apply how McDonald's has done it to their business, which may require a different type of culture or a different approach. They're kind of the seven myths.

Tim Fitzpatrick
David, you just dropped some serious information here. So I want to dig into some of this stuff because I was feverishly writing down some notes. And there's all kinds of stuff that came to my head as we went through these because these seven myths, man, you are like spot on here. So one of the first things that came to mind as we started to go through this, when you were talking about this myth of I need hundreds of systems within my business. My guess is, can you tell me if I'm wrong here? But I think people fall into that trap because they feel like a system has to be like every single step that somebody is going to do. It's like 100 steps. And as you were talking about this, one of my mentors always said, "Look, you need to create systems and processes for smart people, okay? We can't fix stupid." And that always stuck with me. It's like these systems and processes, they don't need to be as detailed as I think most people default to. What are your thoughts on that?

David Jenyns
100%. And the way that I explain it is I say when you're capturing the system, particularly for the first time, just capture the most probable journey, not every single variation. So if you get clear on who the target audience is, the primary product or service that you're selling them, just capture all of the systems related to that. Any time that something falls out of that and becomes an exception, that usually goes to a more senior team member who will have that intelligence that we're talking about to solve that particular problem. So couldn't agree more with the advice that you shared.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You can't come up with every single scenario that's going to come up. Right? I love that. Now, the second thing you talked about was the business owner has to do it all. And I actually think that relates to which one was it? The fifth one that the team won't follow the system because one, as a business owner, I'm not doing everything. If I try to create the system for something I'm not doing every day, man, I'm going to jack that up. Why should I not just go to the person that's doing it every day and say, "Hey, will you capture this for me?" And my thought is that if they are the ones creating the system and putting it together and documenting it, won't they naturally just follow that?

David Jenyns
Yeah. Tremendous wins can be had inside a business by just finding out who currently does something well, capturing it, and then bringing everybody up to that standard. One of the biggest issues that all small business face is the ability to deliver consistency. You don't have to be the world's best at it. If you can just deliver it consistently, even if it's average, even that can be significantly better than all of your other competition because it's that inconsistency. That is the challenge. So identifying who currently does it the best, capturing what they're doing, and probably the one nuance I would add to what you had said is sometimes the people that do it the best are also some of your best team members, and they're also quite busy. So you need to find the easy way to make it possible to capture what they're doing. Because sometimes if you go to your best team member and you say, "Hey, can you document the process for the way that you do this thing?" They might not be assistance person. They might be busy anyway. And the last thing that they think is I've got space, just like the business owner. I don't have time to do this. So there's a few things. One big insight I realized is documenting a system and process, it's a two-person job. You've got the knowledgeable worker, and then you'll have the documenter. The knowledgeable worker might record themselves doing the task. The knowledgeable worker watches that recording, pulls out the key steps, creates a little bit of those ten steps to complete the task. Then they send it back to the knowledgeable worker for proofing. That's infinitely easier because you want to make it easy for your smartest team members.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love this. So two person process, the knowledgeable worker and then the person that's actually documenting it. You touched on Loom. And for those of you that are not familiar with Loom, Loom is a screen capture software. It's L-O-O-M. Loom, honestly, if I had to choose one tool in my business, it would be Loom. Loom is absolutely amazing. You can use it for all kinds of stuff, but for documenting processes and quickly, you touched on, hey, I don't have time to do this, but I'm doing it. Let me just film myself doing it and recording my screen. And then the documenter can take that and utilize that and break it down into a written process. But I'm also hearing and correct me if I'm wrong here, I actually think it is good to have processes documented in multiple formats. Here's a video. Here's written format. Some people love written. Some people just want to watch a video. Is it good to have multiple mediums that people can consume those systems in?

David Jenyns
Definitely. Like, long term. The gold standard is to have a video. To have a step by step process with some bullet points. You might even have some screenshots or a workflow attached to it. That would be the gold standard. The way to get started is whatever is easiest for the person. So some people just go, Loom? Yes, I can just record it rough and ready. Who cares if I make mistakes? Something is better than nothing. This is version number one, which is a great place to start. Some team members, you ask them to record a Loom, even if it's just for them doing a task that they're doing and they'll get stage fright and they'll go and they want to have it just right. And for those people, sometimes they might just be better off having a checklist. So the first version is always what is the easiest for the person to get out without overcomplicating things. But yeah, the gold standard over time, because all systems are actually an organic document that should evolve over time would be to add additional modes. Once you've gone through it ten times, you might have all your bullet points. And then you go, great, I'm going to next time re record my Loom, and I'm going to follow the process of all of the bullets. And now this is version two of my video, and it looks infinitely better. So it's about actually building a culture in the business of systems thinking. That's really what we're looking at doing here. This is not a one and done scenario. This is not all I've captured those 15 systems. My business is now systemized, but rather we kind of get away of thinking that the business owner leads by example.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So this is a process that you're like never done. You're always working on it. Who owns a particular process? Who updates it? What are your thoughts on that?

David Jenyns
Yeah. So depending on the size of the business and I know we talked to a lot of sort of small business owners here, and you've got limited time, money, and resources. So we need to be particular about how and when we approach things. Generally speaking, the person doing the task is ultimately the person that I think should own it. But as you grow and depending on where you're at, if you can have what we call a systems champion on the team, where they kind of help keep this initiative front and center, they help documenting, they help driving it forward, capturing process, all those sorts of things. Generally speaking, when does it get updated for me is when the issue arises. So you're much better off making adjustments to a system live in the moment rather than going this is a process that we review on an annual basis on this particular date. Like, I love a team member to be working on this, and they are a brand new team member that's gone through this task. And they say step number three doesn't work for me. This wasn't clear. They're going to go back to the system owner, asked for the clarification of the supervisor, and the adjustment gets made for the next person who comes through. That's actually one of the best times to review a system is actually also when new team members are coming on.

Tim Fitzpatrick
They're using it.

David Jenyns
They're coming in with fresh eyes, they're looking at it. They don't have that background knowledge. And that's also another perfect time to make adjustments depending on how they move through it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So when they can't follow something, they are poking a hole in the documented system and you can just make that update right then and there.

David Jenyns
Yeah. And that's my preference. I know for certain industries, if they're going for ISO certification or something like that, they need to have as part of their approval process, they need to be reviewing systems every twelve months or every six months or whatever it might be for the certification. But I find a lot of those organizations are doing systems just to tick a box. So they have the certification badge as opposed to we're doing it because the systems are helpful and useful.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. I want to pull just a couple of other things out of here. Before we get to this next question I want to ask you, but one of the things you mentioned in Four, I need a complex system software to do this. I love the fact that you just said, look, keep this simple. Like Rome wasn't built in a day, don't over complicate this. If we make things complicated, it is going to get in the way of us actually taking action and implementing, which I think it's so easy for people to default into that mode of this has to be perfect. No, it doesn't have to be perfect to start. So I love Google Drive. Most of us at this point are using that or if you're on Microsoft, you're using the comparable. This can be documented in a Word document, Google Docs. It can be a checklist. We talked about Loom. I think Loom is a great tool for getting started with systems. Are there other simple tools that you'd like to touch on that people should be aware of or keep top of mind as they look at this?

David Jenyns
Look, I'm a little bit biased. We have a platform called Systemhub.com and it's just a place to store systems and processes. But again, I always say to people when you're just getting started, Google Docs is fine, just something you've got to start the ball rolling as you grow and you want to introduce a central place to store this that is a bit more purpose built. That's a tool you can look at. Other than that, a place to house your systems and processes is one thing. The other thing that you need to look at is your project management platform. How are tasks assigned to team members? When is it due? Who is responsible and the point at which a task is assigned? That's where you want to have the link to the system. So that way there's no confusion around what it is that you're expecting or to the standard you want someone to produce. So for team members that might have been with you for a long time, they might not necessarily open up the system and review it. You only need to tell them to open up and review the system if they don't quite complete the task to the appropriate standard. And you say, oh, you might need to look at the system because we got a way of doing things, and you kind of missed step number five. So that works for your existing. But then for new team members, you assign a task to them and the task then has a description or a system that explains how that thing is done at the point at which you assigned to them. And it's very clear accountability. That's oftentimes the bit that a lot of people miss. It's the accountability of who is doing this by when.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. I love it. There was a ton of value in that stuff we just dropped. So I hope people if you need to rewind, go back and listen to that, because, David, you shared some serious value there. Last thing I want to dig into here is part of this is all scaling and growing your business. What will most business owners never understand about scaling business?

David Jenyns
I think where most business owners get stuck is that they need to keep front and center this idea that your business won't scale unless you have a core product or service that can be delivered without them. Business owners, when they're meddling, stick their fingers in the pie when they think that they are the only people who can deliver it or they must oversee it, it gets built into the foundation and bedrock that that business won't scale because they've built it around them. So I think that's probably the biggest thing just to keep it front and center, say to yourself, unless this core product or service can't be delivered out with me or any key person dependency, we can't scale. So the business is fundamentally broken, and it depends on the type of business you're looking to build. If you want to build a lifestyle business and it's just you or a couple of team members and you're central to it, and it's a little consulting business or whatever it might be, that's okay. But if the goal here is to build a saleable asset that can generate revenue without you that can build and grow and scale, you need to have the core product or service delivered without key person dependency, and you have to keep that front and center the whole way through. And your whole primary objective. Step number one in SYSTEMology, when we do what's called the critical client flow, is to identify what that product or service is going to be and then capture the minimum viable systems to deliver on that, and then make sure that we train others to be able to do it. So it's really just trying to keep coming back to that idea. If there's dependency, you won't be able to scale the business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, you touched on this. There's no right or wrong answer here. Some of us want to grow a huge business. Some of us don't. But no matter what you want out of your business, we can all benefit significantly by putting systems in place. Even if it's a small lifestyle business, it's going to make my life a whole lot easier if I've got systems in place to deliver at least half of the stuff that we're working on.

David Jenyns
For me, I think of business systems like business insurance. Oftentimes business owners will take out business insurance, public liability or indemnity insurance or whatever. That's a premium that they pay to someone else if a mistake is made. Business systems reduce errors. When you've got a process, it reduces the likelihood of needing that. So it's almost like insurance at its core on your business. If something happens to you tomorrow, if you get sick or someone in your family gets COVID and they need to take time out and you have to focus on them, that's a significant event by having systems, that's an insurance policy on your business, that things can kind of continue to happen and that you're reducing the chance of things just crashing and burning. So I always kind of come back to this idea of if you're investing in business insurance, probably the best thing that you can do is invest in your business systems because it's the insurance that you own, because you own the asset of the system or the process.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. David, you have shared some serious information, and I really appreciate it. Any last-minute thoughts, words of wisdom you want to leave us with today?

David Jenyns
Main thing, I'm hoping somebody listens to this, lit a fire in them, and they can feel my passion for systems enough to go, I'm going to re look at this. I might have believed some of those myths. Maybe I need to test some of those assumptions. Maybe the way I've been thinking about it is wrong. And I don't love creating systems and processes. That's kind of the dirty little secret of system. I don't love doing that. But you don't have to be a lover of business systems to own a systems driven business. Me as a founder, visionary, creative, I've fallen in love with the result that business systems delivers, not in the process of creating them. I now see businesses with and without systems, and it's a night and day difference. So that's what I'm passionate about. Hopefully someone hears that and goes, this is enough for me to at least start making the process and taking the steps to go, maybe I can do this. Maybe this is something I need to explore.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it. You talked about so your website SYSTEMOlogy.com. Your book is also titled SYSTEMOlogy, is it not?

David Jenyns
Yeah, that's right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, people. Yes. Love it. So you've been listening or you're watching, David obviously knows what the hell he's doing. He's dropped some serious value. Go check out the website SYSTEMOlogy.com Or go on to Amazon or anywhere else, any other book sellers? Yes?

David Jenyns
And anyone who's listening to this, like you're obviously an audio type person, the book is available at Audible. So if that's your preference, have me read the book to you and you'll hear Michael Gerber. He opens the book because he wrote the forward to the book and you get to hear him and his wife. And that might be a good way for you to kind of work through the material.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. David, thank you so much, man. I really appreciate you taking the time to be here. For those of you that are watching, listening, thank you so much. Again, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. If you're struggling with your marketing, you're not quite sure what that next right step is to get where you want to go. You're trying different things. Nothing seems to be working. Hop on over to our website, RialtoMarketing.com. It's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing.com. Click on the get a free consultation button. I will give you some clarity on what those next steps should be. So that you can move forward with confidence. Thanks so much. Till next time. Take care.


Connect With David Jenyns


Links From The Episode


About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

Do you know you have an opportunity for revenue growth and are unsure how to make it happen? Do you lack someone with the time, skill set, and desire to take ownership of marketing to drive results?

When it comes to marketing, it's easy to fall prey to information overload. We understand how overwhelming and frustrating marketing your business can be. But, marketing shouldn't be difficult.

At Rialto Marketing, we work with B2B professional service firms that want to accelerate revenue growth and attract more ideal clients.

So, stop gambling with your marketing budget each month. Put an end to guessing what your next marketing step should be and hoping it works. It's time to remove your revenue roadblocks.

Wouldn't you like to reach your revenue goals faster? Let us run your marketing, so you don't have to.