Crush The Day Before It Crushes You

Crush The Day Before It Crushes You

Drewbie Wilson lost over 100lbs without drugs or fad diets. Quit an established career in insurance and moved his entire family states away for an opportunity. Has generated multiple millions of dollars in online sales using memes. He’s going to share with us his philosophy about success in business and life through service to others so we can crush each and every day!

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Crush The Day Before It Crushes You



Tim Fitzpatrick
Our special guest today lost over 100 pounds without drugs or fad diet. He quit an established career in insurance and moved his entire family states away for an opportunity. And he also generated multiple millions of dollars in online sales using memes. Today, he is going to share with us his philosophy about success in business and in life through service to others so that we can crush each and every day. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. I am super excited to have with me today Drewbie Wilson from Break Free Academy. Drewbie, thanks for taking the time, man, happy to have you here.

Drewbie Wilson
Hey, thank you, Tim. I'm grateful for the opportunity and getting a chance to share some things with your audience, man. It's a pleasure to be here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. Well, I'm looking forward to digging into this. Before we do that, let's jump into some rapid-fire questions. Help us get to know you a little bit better. You ready to rock?

Drewbie Wilson
Let's do this.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, so when you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Drewbie Wilson
I like to hang out with my wife and my son. And we go on different adventures, sometimes it's to a market, sometimes to an amusement park. But we're always just doing something together.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. Love it. What's your hidden talent?

Drewbie Wilson
Hidden talent? Um, I have a thing for remembering names and faces.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, that's a good talent to have, man, I'm horrible at that.

Drewbie Wilson
It's weird, but, you know, it's come in handy quite a bit.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Drewbie Wilson
Best piece of advice I ever got. The wise man doesn't have to have the answer for every question, but he should know where to start looking for it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's a great piece of advice because we're never going to know everything, right? We just have to know where to get it. What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Drewbie Wilson
For most people, if they are just meeting me, it's hearing about my weight loss journey. But other than that, it's people kind of hearing my background and story and kind of seeing where I'm at now and just the transformation that's happened.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, yeah, I can imagine that, right? Well, people that are watching can see this, but nobody would look at you and even think that you ever had a weight issue at all. So I'm excited to dig into that. What does success mean to you?

Drewbie Wilson
So success. What I love about success is something I've really dived into lately is the idea that success is a perception, right? So for every individual, success is a different thing. For some people, it could be lots of money and big houses and cars and material possessions. For someone else, it might just be making enough to pay their bills and still have the time to go home and be with their family and go to their kid's soccer games or whatever, right? So I think the thing about success is that you shouldn't let it yours be skewed by what someone else considers success, what makes you happy and feel fulfilled, because that's what success should be.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Don't compare yourself to others, right?

Drewbie Wilson
It's hard, man, but you know.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It is super hard.

Drewbie Wilson
When you start adopting that mindset and you just focus on yourself and the people closest to you. It's interesting how things change.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yep. Where's your happy place?

Drewbie Wilson
Either with my wife and my son doing something cool or I love long-distance bike rides. So one hundred-mile bike ride isn't something out of the ordinary to catch me doing on a Saturday and just being out there? It's kind of like my meditation zone.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I'm assuming you rode bike then?

Drewbie Wilson
Yes, I rode BMX bikes growing up trike x games stuff and then got into rode bikes as I got a little older, less high impact on my body and I fell in love with it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's kind of hard to mountain bike in Texas, isn't it?

Drewbie Wilson
You know, there are some trails, but I'm you know, I don't really love the mountain bike stuffing as much. I like the road man because like I said, it's something I can go out there and just get in my little zone and just do my thing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Do your thing. I love it. What qualities do you value in people with whom you spend time?

Drewbie Wilson
Integrity and punctuality.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Two very good things. So tell us a little bit more about what you're doing today with Breakfree Academy before we jump into this.

Drewbie Wilson
Yeah, absolutely. Thank you. So I am currently the vice president of Breakfree Academy. We are a coaching and consulting company. Essentially, it's a community of like minded, success driven individuals, entrepreneurs, business owners. And we all have the same mission, which is to match our reality to the most elite version of ourselves. So it's a very high level business mastermind designed to just really help people become that best version of themselves.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And what so what are the different programs? What type of all different kinds of entrepreneurs and business owners?

Drewbie Wilson
So, yeah. So we have our flagship program is called Apex and we have 3 tiers of that program based on where you're at in your life and in your business. So on a foundational level, the first things you have to learn as an entrepreneur are sales, marketing, and networking, right? You got to know how to sell stuff. You've got to know how to find people to sell it to. And you've got to find the right people to connect with to build those relationships, referrals, things like that, right? So that's kind of our foundational. Then as you become an entrepreneur. It's like, hey, I've got to learn how to hire people. I need to delegate some of these tasks off of my plate so I can focus on these bigger picture items. But until I can get rid of some of these day to day tasks, I'm never going to be able to get to that next level. Once you've hired 5or 10 people and you can step away from your business for a month or two and know it's not going to burn to the ground, right? You're more of an executive or a CEO. So it's one main program, but it's tiered levels of coaching based on where you're at in your life and in your business to make sure you're getting the right kind of solutions to the problems you're facing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it. So you mentioned your weight loss. Let's dig into this. You what kind of mindset did it take for you to go from 315 pounds down to 200 pounds without drugs or fad diets?

Drewbie Wilson
You know, man, growing up, I always struggled with my weight. I was always the husky kid. You know, when I was 13 in middle school, I was shopping in the adult section for pants because I wish I was just a big kid. And we always grew up convenience eating. And my mom was a single mom and I had two other brothers. So we would always eat as fast as we could. So we didn't go without. And so I always struggled with weight. And as I got older, I got, you know, I went through phases where I would lose weight and gain weight and lose weight and gain weight. And then I was at my lowest point, probably around at my highest point, 315. I had dropped down to about 225, met my wife and kind of got comfortable and then put on a few pounds as we started going out, you know, like that's the stuff that happens.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Drewbie Wilson
And then she got pregnant and the sympathy pregnancy weight was a real thing in our house. And I, I got it back up to about 285 pounds at one point. And when my son was born and I was struggling like doing things and moving him and picking him up, I was like, you know what, I don't want to be the dad that can't play at the park with his son because he's winded. I don't want to be the guy that's sitting on the bench with my pits all sweaty because I can't do this because I didn't take the time to make myself a better person for my son and for my wife, right? Like my wife married a guy that did not look like the guy I was at that time. And so I started having those thoughts of like, "Hey, what am I doing here?" Like, it's one thing to put on a couple of pounds, but this is a whole different thing, dude. Like, you're reverting back to your old tendencies. And so, I told my wife, I said, "Hey, I find myself tossing and turning in the morning and kind of feeling like I should get up, but I just hit the snooze button until I got to get up and go to the office." At the time I was selling insurance. And I just I think I'm just going to get up and go for a walk and maybe just try to get my mind right. Because at this time I was really I was doing well in sales with the insurance gig, but I didn't feel fulfilled like I was making all these marks and getting all these awards and but like, I didn't feel great about the job. And so it was all kind of coming together. I was like, "Hey, I'm going to get up and go for these walks and I'm going to start listening to YouTube and podcasts and books on Audible." Right? And just as motivational, inspirational kind of stuff, trying to find myself. And so that's what I did, right? I would get up every morning around 4:30 or 5 o'clock, and I'd go for walks and I'd listen to guys like Ed Mallett and Jim Rohn and Ryan Stewman and these different mentors that were out there giving away all of this free content. And so that's what I started doing. I did that consistently. And then I got back into road biking and picked up a road bike and really fell in love with that side of it. And so I realized from myself, personally, I never liked working out, I don't like going to the gym, but I fell in love with the cardio and that's what allowed me to really lose the weight is like I could use that time as my own meditation, my own time to get my thoughts right. And I could do two things at one time because I could go and work out and do something to kind of stuff. But the reward was when I was done, I felt great and I was fired up to go do something inspirational or powerful in my life because of the content that I was just like bingeing during that time.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, it seems like. So there was a point of critical mass for you where if you were married, you had your first child, that kind of got you really thinking about, man, I need to make a change. But then the second part of that, which is I think where a lot of people struggle, is building the habit or the habits that they need to have in place to get to where they want to be. And you've built that habit. And because you built the habit, now you don't even think about it. Right? It's like you don't at least for me. Like, I work I exercise every weekday. I get up at 5, I meditate, I exercise. I don't even think about it. I don't feel right if I don't do it. And so it's just become this thing that I don't even think about anymore. And it sounds like that's kind of similar for you. You just it's just become part of your life at this point.

Drewbie Wilson
Yeah. You know, one of the things I talk about a lot and we'll probably get a chance to dove into this here later in the call, is the value of intentionality with your time, right? Like like you said, you got to a point now where it was so routine and consistent that if you don't do it, you feel guilty. And so that's how you rewire your mind. And for me, it was the routine. And that's why I was like, hey, when you're teaching a kid to walk, you don't just do it once in a while, like every day, a couple times a day, you're like, hey, let's stand up and try to walk across the couch. You know, it's the same thing with everything in our life and every habit. If you're not consistent with it, it's not going to stick. And so that's where you have to I think the thing that most people forget to do is do things that make them feel good. They kind of get into that box of like, "Oh, well, I have to go to the gym and workout." And I like I personally don't really like the gym. I've gotten better about it now that I found a gym and people that I like being around. But if it was just up to me to go to the gym by myself, I never would do it. Because I don't like that. That's not my atmosphere. But I love a walk. I love riding my bike outside and being in the fresh air and being able to clear my thoughts. And so I think people underestimate the value of something like going for a good long walk, right? Go walk three or four miles, spend an hour, hour and a half walk and they look at your heart rate up. And then that's just the routine, right? And then you start saying, "Oh, well, I feel pretty good about that. I wonder how I would feel if I did this or did that." Right? And that's how you can explore and expand on those different habits that will get you into that health mindset.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Do you feel like it was your why? That was your why was strong enough for you to be consistent about the routine, would you say that?

Drewbie Wilson
I knew that if, yes. I knew that if I didn't do it, I wouldn't live long enough to be there for my family. And that's unacceptable.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So it was the why that got it started and helped you stick with the routine. And now that you've got the routine, you're good.

Drewbie Wilson
One hundred percent.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. OK, cool. I love it. So let's dig into insurance. You touched it, you touched on the fact that you were in insurance for a while. You know, you were successful. Things were going well, and I'm assuming when one day you went to your wife and you're like, "Hey, honey, I want to pick up and move to Texas and do something totally different. Are you with me?"

Drewbie Wilson
That's like the short version, no, the longer version of it is this, right? So I was selling insurance. I was like peak in my market, top 3 or 4 people in the market every month consistently for numbers and sales. And I was kind of at that plateau of like, "Hey, I'm working a lot, but I want to make more money." Right? I've seen all these guys out here on the Internet talking about how they're making, you know, 10, 15, 20 thousand dollars a month. And I'm just going, man, I'm making like 3 or 4 and I'm working hard, like, what am I doing wrong? And so, again, the basics hey, I know sales. Now, I need to learn marketing. If I could get more leads to talk to and sell then, that's just more money I can make. So I started exploring online marketing and that's why I learned all that stuff about Facebook funnels and pay per click advertising and websites and all these different things. And so I kind of dove into that realm, got good at the marketing, learned how to generate some leads for myself in the insurance industry, had a few other agents that said, "Hey, man, I see you're like making a lot more sales all of a sudden, like, what are you doing?" So well I got this new marketing thing I figured out, right? Like, kind of cool little deal. And they're like, "Well, I don't have time to learn it, but how much for you to set it up and run one for me?" So I'm like, well, you know, 15 hundred bucks. 25 hundred bucks, whatever. OK, cool, we're paying 5, 10 thousand dollars a month for leads like we'll definitely pay you to try it like we've thrown money away, worst things. So I went down that path, right? And started learning the marketing. Then I started selling it as a service and now all of a sudden I'm going from making $4,000 a month working my tail off in the agency to making five or six thousand dollars on a weekend, doing marketing services for these guys. And then so it expanded to real estate agents and mortgage officers, right? Well, then that got me further plugged in with Ryan Stewman here at Break Free Academy and our Apex coaching program, because I was like, "Hey, like, what's the next step from here?" Right? Like, I kind of got sales and marketing, but I'm not really plugged in with a network of people. So I got plugged in to APEX, started helping people in the APEX, and then Brian calls me one day and he says, "Hey, man, like I like all the support you're giving my people. You're helping a lot of folks. Would you be interested in coming on as like a support role for the company. I'll give you like a small base retainer and kind of see how it goes." So I was like, "Well, sure, man, I'll take the opportunity." And started doing that. I started making a couple of sales because I was helping people, like serving them like, "Hey man, what do you mean how can I help you figure out your problem?" And they're like, "All right, will you help me do this? What's up with that other Apex program? How do I get into that?" So I call Ryan. I said, Hey, man, these guys, they want to buy some stuff. What do I do?" "What do you mean? Just sell it to them. Help them out." So I start selling a couple of people. I meet with Ryan and he is like, "Dude, you're in the wrong business. Come work with me. We can change a lot of lives together. I will show you the way to becoming massively successful beyond anything you ever imagined." And so, yeah, man, I had to make that hard decision of do I walk away from 6 years and insurance where I can be comfortable but not totally fulfilled, or do I take this opportunity and go into something that could totally blow up in my face? But what's the worst that happens? I go back to selling insurance, you know, so I start working there a remote. 6 months in, I went back home because I was flying back and forth a lot. I said, "All right, I think we need to move to Dallas like this is the next step." And there's just no absolutely not happening. We went back and forth on it and ultimately she said, you know, like, "I believe in you, I will support you on this journey." And so we put our house on the market. 24 hours later, I had a full price offer and within 60 days we had packed everything up and one-way ticket to Dallas.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So what do you think? What's what was your biggest learning experience from from that process?

Drewbie Wilson
Biggest learning experience from that process? Don't skip opportunity when it shows up.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I guess then also starts to you have to have the ability to recognize opportunity first, right?

Drewbie Wilson
Yes. And I think that is part of it is just being open to opportunity and also being open to what does that next best version of yourself look like? Right? Are you comfortable or do you know there's something deeper inside of you that you want to bring out? And are you willing to commit to that because you can't go half in, half out? Right? Like you've got to be willing to commit to it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. You got to jump in with both feet or it's not going to work, right? Yep. Awesome. So let's talk about memes. Oh, a lot of people see memes, they love memes. They make them laugh. Let's see what we can pull out of this that people can use within their business. So you use Meems. But let's talk about how you use memes to generate online sales.

Drewbie Wilson
Love it. Happy to. So, I love memes. I grew up in that age where we were like making memes and sending memes and I'm like 17 different Facebook group chats where we all try to find the funniest memes. And so, like, I've always just loved them. And one day I was going through making sales and, I do a lot of sales and Facebook Messenger D.M. and text message DMs these days, I don't get on calls, but a lot of it is just conversational. And so I had a lot of people who had gotten to the point where it was like I had given them a price. I told them all the breakdown, handled all their objections, and they kind of just went ghost, right? Like, if you've been in sales before, you know what it means to get ghosted. And so I went in and I found a couple of funny memes that were like a guy on a bench holding a cell phone like a skeleton. And I just went waiting for you to call back. And I sent it to a bunch of people that had ghosted me. I'm like, what's the worst that's going to happen? They don't respond. And out of the 20 people I sent it to, I got 15 responses within an hour, like and these are people that had ghosted me for weeks, months on end, just out of the blue. I hit them with this meme and they respond back and they're like, "Oh, my God, that's hilarious. I've been meaning to catch up with you." Go ahead.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Is this with sales that you're making through Break Free Academy or?

Drewbie Wilson
Yes. So this is for our coaching and consulting company and packages ranging anywhere from $5,000 a year to $50,000 a year.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK.

Drewbie Wilson
So I start sending these memesand people start responding. I start having picking the conversation back up close a few deals. I probably close, I don't know, 25, $30,000 and deals just from those people that had completely ghosted me. And I was like, "I'm going to send them a meme and see what happens." So now I'm in my mind, going like, "Is this a fluke or what's the deal here?" So I reach out to a couple of friends of mine that are in the sales world and I say, "Hey, try this." They try it. They hit me back. They're like, "Dude, I got responses from people that I never expected a response from. This is crazy. And so that started the wheels turning. It's like, OK, maybe there's something behind it, right? What's the reasoning for this? Well, yeah, everybody loves memes. Most people, when they're sending follow-up messages, they use, like can copy-paste nonsense, it's like very vague. And then when you send a picture to somebody, when they get like a text message as a picture or a message, it's like, "Oh, you got a picture. "It's like subconsciously you're like, what did this guy just send me? Like, you know, I can't see the preview of the, "Hey, John, I'm just following up." Yeah. It's like, "Hey, you got a picture." So then they open it up and they look at it and they're going to laugh because everybody loves memes. And then it's just that psychological like, "Oh, this dude's normal. He doesn't he's not just trying to sell me something. Like he's a normal guy. I can buy." It like that know, like and trust factor comes back. That there's some emotional connection, a trigger there like. "Oh yeah. I did ghost that guy. That's funny." You know, I mean like that's, that's what it does. And so I went on and created a course and said, "Hey, like what's psychologically the process here." Right. Like how can we address this? How can we find the right kind of content, the right image, the right copywriting material to put on the meme? So that actually gets attention and attracts people to take an action.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So are you just pulling memes from the Internet, are you creating your own memes? Do you personalize the memes?

Drewbie Wilson
Yes. So I do custom memes for people, so I'll put a meme with someone's name in it to really personalize it. And then I have a couple of different resources where I can find blank templates and images that I can go in and then utilize and create my own memes out of. So one of the things I do every day is I make 2 to 3 brand new memes from like a resource of different images. So I'm always trying to come up with new content and create new memes that are relatable to the sales community and to the, you know, the coaching and online world, because that's my audience. So that's part of the process. And I know my audience, so I know what they're going to relate to and what kind of experiences they're having and going through. So I know how to create the content that gets their attention and then gets them to respond and want to speak to me about what I'm doing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you're creating your own memes. You've got a stable of memes at this point. If you're sending them out, you're just going to you're going to put in their name in the meme. And then you're inserting the meme in the email and then are you putting in additional text to follow up on that message?

Drewbie Wilson
So I'll send them in emails and I'll send them in text messages or in DMs. And I like sometimes will personalize them. Sometimes I just reuse the same meme like I have a swipe file in my phone of like one hundred different memes that I've used for follow-up, one in particular that I've used that I can trace back to multiple millions of dollars in sales. Just one specific image that I've used in the follow-up process to rejuvenate the conversation. And people seem to love it, man, that's crazy,

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you use them. It's not just when people ghost you, it's other follow-up messages. You've got different memes. Are you always using memes or do you just do you kind of stagger it, depending on what's going on?

Drewbie Wilson
That's accurate. But I almost always use it. I've kind of gotten to that point where people know me for it. So I think sometimes they kind of just wait to see what I'm going to do. You know, it's crazy and I don't mean to rush, but I do have another appointment that I better get to here shortly. I want to tell you, I'm grateful for the opportunity to be here, though.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I appreciate you sharing that, because I think a lot of people have no idea that you could even do that. So where can people learn more about you, Drewbie?

Drewbie Wilson
Yes. So if you go to Connect With Drewbie dot com and he's got to scrolling here on the banner, it's Drew B.I.E. So connect with Drew B I E dot com. I've got my closer memes course where I can teach you how to do this yourself, teach you all the resources and best ways to implement it. I've got all my social media. So if you want to follow me to learn more about this process, feel free to reach out. Man, I've built my whole career on trying to help others become more successful in what they're doing. So I'm always happy to connect and help people that are on the rise.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. Drewbie, I really appreciate it, man. Thank you for being here. Thank you for you guys for tuning in today. I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. If you want to gain clarity on where to focus your marketing efforts right now, hop on over to our website at Rialto Marketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O marketing dot com. Click on the Get a Free Consult button. Be happy to help. Thank you for tuning in until next time. Take care.


Connect With Drewbie Wilson


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About the Author Tim Fitzpatrick

Tim Fitzpatrick is the President of Rialto Marketing. At Rialto Marketing, we help service businesses simplify marketing so they can grow with less stress. We do this by creating and implementing a plan to communicate the right message to the right people. Marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the RIGHT plan.

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