Exhausted To Extraordinary In 15-Minutes A Day

January

11

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Being an entrepreneur takes a lot of work. To be effective and productive, our health and well-being must be a priority. We have Dr. Sharon Grossman with us today. She will share the five micro habits that can help you go from exhausted to extraordinary in 15-minutes a day.

Join Dr. Sharon Grossman and Tim Fitzpatrick for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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Exhausted To Extraordinary In 15-Minutes A Day



Tim Fitzpatrick
Being an entrepreneur takes a lot of work to be effective and productive. Our health and our well-being must be a top priority. That is why I have a special guest with me today and she is going to share her five micro habits that can help you go from exhausted to extraordinary in 15 minutes a day. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. I am super excited to have with me, Dr. Sharon Grossman. Sharon, welcome and thank you for taking the time to be here.

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. Thanks for having me, Tim. I'm excited to share all these micro tips and talk about burnout and all the things.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, it is inevitable. As an entrepreneur at some point, we are going to be exhausted. I don't know. I guess it's just built into us in some way, shape or form, but we are never going to be effective long term if we don't find ways to manage that. So I am excited to dig into this. Before we do that, I want to ask you some rapid-fire questions to help us get to know you a little bit. Are you ready to jump in with both feet?

Sharon Grossman
I'm all about it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. So when you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Sharon Grossman
I am a professional development junkie. And so I am always looking for either a book to read, a course to take. I'm subscribed to Mind Value if you've heard of them. So I'm always looking for new things that are going to keep the juices flowing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Cool. I love it. So you are a lifelong learner.

Sharon Grossman
I am.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay.

Sharon Grossman
And then what's cool is I can take some of that stuff and then I pass it on to my students and my clients, and they get the benefit of learning all these amazing things that exist out there in the world.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I'm with you. I am the exact same way. And I would say the older I get, the better I am getting at making sure that as I consume content, I take at least one thing and I implement it. Because if we consume all this stuff and we don't implement it, then we're just consuming information. Right?

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. That's key.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So what's your hidden talent?

Sharon Grossman
So what I like to say is my hidden talent is getting to the core of things. So sometimes people come to me and they are a hot mess, right? They have all kinds of thoughts and feelings and they're all over the place and they're like, "Oh, I don't make any sense. And I've got all these things going through my head." And so I can listen to all of that and kind of dwindle it down to the essence and be able to identify what are the patterns. What are the things that are going on and be able to give that back to them very organized and have them be able to identify, like you said, what are my takeaways or what's my next action step that's going to move me forward.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Sharon Grossman
So when I started undergrad, my dad said to me, if you decide that because I was specializing in psychology, he said, "If you decide that this isn't for you, just know that you can start over." And I thought, this is such a great tip, regardless of what it is that you're trying because we're always trying something where we don't necessarily know. Is it going to be a fit? Is it going to work out for me? Whether it's a relationship, a job, anything. So just having that permission to fail and then figure it out is, I think, fantastic advice.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I would imagine that's a very freeing mindset to have.

Sharon Grossman
It is.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It takes the pressure off.

Sharon Grossman
Exactly. Because it's like adopting that growth mindset of whatever it is I'll figure it out, and there's always another opportunity around the corner.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Sharon Grossman
So this is actually a super interesting kind of fun fact. I am a burnout recovery coach. And so when I talk to people about what I do, and then I hear about other burnout recovery coaches, I find that I'm the only one in the room that hasn't actually experienced burnout because every other burnout recovery coach became a burnout recovery coach because they burned out and they figured out how to do it differently. And now they're so passionate about teaching other people their experience. It's kind of like the true hero's journey, if you will. And my story is very different. So I'm doing this work, but not because of personal experience.

Tim Fitzpatrick
My guess would be that you haven't burned out because you had these skills, right?

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. Well, it's a lot of intention and planning and things and just being led by your values. So a lot of the things that people teach as part of burnout recovery is kind of how I was living my life with at the forefront to make sure that I didn't burn out. And so I find that oftentimes people don't know what to do with that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What does success mean to you?

Sharon Grossman
To me, success means having balance. And sometimes people don't really like that term because they think of balance as everything has to be exactly 50-50 split. So work-life balance means that you have to spend half of the time at work and half the time outside of work, and there's not enough time in the day, and that's not possible. So that doesn't exist. And I say that's just a very narrow definition of the word. To me, balance can be that you're just taking five minutes in an hour or an hour in a day or whatever it is. It could be just a portion of a bigger spend that you're doing to focus on things that are going to bring you into that alignment with yourself. So if you're focused only on your mind and you're neglecting your body, you're out of balance. If you're focused only on work and you're not focused on your family, you're out of balance. As human beings, we are these complex characters. We've got all these things going on in our lives, and balance means that you're tapping into all of the things and not necessarily equally, but that you're not neglecting any part of you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Sharon Grossman
Well, I really love walking down a beautiful beach on a sunny day. And this past summer, we moved to Miami Beach, and I get to do that on the regular.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Now where were you before?

Sharon Grossman
San Francisco.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Really? Okay. We're going to have to talk off air because I grew up in the Bay Area. Wow. That's quite a move. It is. What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Sharon Grossman
I would say there are three main things that I really value. The first is empathy. I think it's really important to be able to understand where other people are coming from. The second is thoughtfulness. So that there is that reciprocation happening that there is that give and take when you show up. It's not like, "Oh, I just stumbled out of bed and I didn't really give it any thought." But like, "I'm showing up with you in mind." And I love that. And then a little bit of pizzazz, because that just is what makes life a little bit more fun when you talk to people and they have energy and they're fun and interesting. So that's what I look for.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Thank you for sharing. I want to dig into before we jump into the questions that I want to ask you, tell us a little bit more about what you're doing. You mentioned you're a burnout recovery coach. What does that mean? What types of people are you working with?

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. So I work with super high achievers. These are the people that tend to burn out the most. And what I do is I help them master their mindset because most of them are really spinning their wheels. They're exhausted and frustrated about the tool that their work is taking on their lives. So what I do is I help them to stay calm, even in situations that are seemingly scary, to effectively manage the demands on their time and to quickly bounce back from adversity so that they don't burn out. So really, what I'm doing is I'm empowering to break out of those negative thinking patterns and the fears that maybe drive them to do things in a certain way so that they can feel happy in their work and life.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Love it. So you touched on mindset. Can mindset lead to burnout? And, frankly, are there other things that lead to burnout?

Sharon Grossman
Oh, yeah. So there are certainly a variety of different factors that lead to burnout and as a matter of fact, I really think it's important for people to identify what those factors are, because just because you're burned out and you have that diagnosis or that title doesn't mean that you now know what to do about it. And if there's a burnout solution that's helped somebody else, it doesn't necessarily mean that it's going to help you. So I'm a big proponent of what I call decoding your burnout, identifying what are those underlying factors that have contributed to your version of burnout because based on that, you can customize your recovery solution. And so getting back to mindset, I think that's a big part of it, because the way that we are programmed is one of three main contributors that I see that lead people to burn out. So what do I mean by programming? It's like all of those early experiences that you had that have shaped your worldview, the way that you see the world, your belief structures, all of that affects how you think about things that are happening in this moment. And that means that when something happens, you're interpreting it in a certain way, and that can lead you to burnout more quickly because it produces stress or frustration or resentment. So all of our emotions are a direct result of our thinking.

Tim Fitzpatrick
One of the things I pulled out of what you just said is when you work with people, you're taking the time to figure out exactly where their burnout is coming from, right? It's not a one size fits all application. We need to dig deep because our burnout is being caused by different things depending on who we are and what we're doing. Right?

Sharon Grossman
Exactly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. That's super important. So when you work with people, what does that look like? Is it for a set period of time? How does that work?

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. So it just depends on how they want to work with me. For instance, I mentioned Decode Your Burnout. That's actually a program that I recently created. That's something that they can do on their own. Get through all the content pretty quickly, and then we've got a community where they can jump on and we do monthly Q and A calls to answer any of their questions. So there is some interaction, not just with me, but with other like minded individuals. But then if they really want to work more closely with me, I actually have a longer process, which is a twelve week program where I take you through all of the steps that I mentioned in my book, The 70 Solution to Burnout. And I really get deep into the mindsets, the behavioral patterns. We're working to deconstruct what you're currently doing and help you kind of restructure the way that you think the way that you do things. I help people really understand how all the things come together, whether it's their programming, whether it's environmental stressors, and how to feel less stressed out by them whether it's just understanding that you have options, because sometimes people feel stuck, they don't understand that they have a choice. So they're kind of operating from this very narrow framework. And so we're opening that up a little bit. And then finally, how their personality comes into the mix. And I got to tell you, Tim, like the majority of people that come to me come at a point where they are convinced that they are burned out because of all the things out there, and they have very little insight as to what they're bringing into the situation that's contributing to burnout. I like to say that burnout is usually a combination of internal and external factors. And when we get clear on what those things are, then we can start to do the work to really change that around. And my passion is to help people who are passionate about their work, to stay in their industry, to stay in their job, to stay doing what they love to do rather than what we're seeing a lot of right now is everybody's fleeing, everybody's trying to figure out what can I do different because this isn't working out for me, and it's like you don't have to. I mean, certainly if you're not happy and you're absolutely miserable and this isn't the right fit for you be my guest, right. But if you love what you do and you've spent ten years getting to this point, doing what you do, and you want to figure out a way to stay here and continue to do it without the burnout and the stress. That's what I'm passionate about doing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Let's dig into these micro habits. So you talk about five micro habits that can make a huge difference in our health and well-being. Can you break these down for us?

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. So just to make it easy for people to remember, I tried to come up with some sort of an acronym. It's the letter F, and then Rope. R-O-P-E. And so I'll take you through these one by one. So the first one, F, stands for focus on what you can control. And this sounds really simple and things that you've probably heard of before. But I find that so few people actually do this, and it's actually pretty much a game-changer because the reason we are so stressed out most of the time is because we're focusing on things that we don't have control over. And so we're feeling resentful. We're frustrated. We're filled with all these negative emotions, and that takes a huge toll on us. Right? When we have all these negative emotions, it actually reduces our total energy. So if you think of yourself as an energy pack or a battery pack kind of like your phone, every time you're focusing on all these negatives, it just depletes your energy level until your battery is basically run out. And that's burnout, right? Burnout just basically hit exhaustion. So what we want to do is remind you that there are things that you can, and then there are things that you can't control. So I would say, the way I like to break it down is you want to look at what are the circumstances? In other words, what are the facts? What's actually happening? Those are the things that you don't necessarily have control over. What you do have control over is the way that you think about those things. And so even if you can't change your circumstances, like we just talked about people who are leaving their jobs, that's something that you can choose to do. That's always available to you. And that's something that you have control over. But if you are in a situation and maybe you can't leave or you're trying to figure out a solution and you're not exactly happy about the way things are going, you still have something that you can control, and that is your interpretation or what you do in that situation that can change how you feel. And so identifying what those things are can be a real game changer for people in terms of just not feeling so stressed out and not feeling so anxious. And the reason why we feel so anxious usually is because we feel out of control. And when we feel out of control, guess what we do that's when we're trying to control everybody else around us. Right. So that's where we're seeing, like the perfectionism come in and the micromanagement come in and things like that. And that's just more stress creation.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Okay. So focus on what we can control. What's the second one?

Sharon Grossman
The second one is reviewing your day. So one thing that I am a big proponent of is to take the time, not just to plan what you're going to do in your day or in your week, but then actually take the time to review what you've done. And the reason this is important, especially with the people that I work with, who are those super high achievers is you're constantly in that go go mentality. So you're never really taking the time to reflect on what you've accomplished. And then it feels like you haven't really done that much. And so you feel inadequate. You feel like there's still more that you have to do. That what you've done is not enough. And you got to do more. And so if you take that time to really sit down and ask yourself, what have I done today or what have I accomplished this week? You start to look, especially if you're writing them down. If you've got some sort of a system. And I know, Tim, we talked before the show. It sounds like you're one of those people who's super organized, right. And you talked about how many shows you've been on this past year. So you are actually keeping count of that right. Now, if you weren't keeping count and I asked you, "Hey, Tim, what have you done this year?" And you said, "I've been on a bunch of podcasts." You may not have a full sense of what you've done and how much you've done and giving yourself credit for it is not an option at that point, because you're kind of undermining yourself, and people who are super driven are always looking for the next thing. So it's an opportunity to kind of slow down and acknowledge yourself for all the hard work that you're putting in there. And that allows you to then say, "Well, maybe I have done enough." And that gives you permission to just rest and recover rather than continue to push yourself forward to do more and more and more until you burn out.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. So the key benefit in reviewing our day is really recognizing what we've accomplished. Otherwise, it is so easy for us to just keep going and not recognize any of our accomplishments.

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. And then it just allows you to take a break because you're like, "Okay. I've set out to do five interviews. I've done the five interviews." Or, "I set out to make five calls, and I've made those five calls." And I don't have to feel like, "Oh, well, I still have another hour. I can do more." I could be like, "Oh, I have an hour. I've already accomplished everything I needed to accomplish. Maybe I go for a walk. Maybe I go read that book that has been sitting on the shelf for two months." We're always complaining that we don't have enough time for ourselves, and it's like, well, if we're efficient, which is one of the things I'm trying to teach people how to do is be more efficient, part of that is being structured, like we talked about being organized, planning ahead and all these things, but also getting that time back for yourself so that you can actually use it for yourself rather than being like, oh, maybe I can do more work.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Okay. So focus on what we can control. Review our day. Step three.

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. So the third thing that you want to do is organize your space. Now, this is not something that you usually hear when it comes to burnout or other kinds of things related to stress, necessarily. But the reason I find that this is important is because when you are in a specific area, a room, what have you an office, the way that things are organized around you actually affects how you feel. And one way that we know that. And there's a couple of different examples that I like to share is like when we go to a hotel and you walk in and the bed is made and everything's perfectly organized, you feel calm. Right. But what happens on those days where the cleaning team didn't show up or you had that sign on the door and you asked them not to come in, and then you open that door and your bed is a mess, and your suitcase is on the floor, and there's clothes everywhere and towels thrown here and there. It's a different energy, right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Sharon Grossman
And so I always tell people, just take those 30 seconds and make your bed when you wake up in the morning and before you sit down at your desk, make sure that everything's organized. And you've got a system for where you put your pens and where you put your mug. And just like everything's put away when you're done working. The more organized you are, the more relaxed your brain can feel. If you live in chaos externally, in terms of the visuals that are coming in, your brain is also going to feel very chaotic.

Tim Fitzpatrick
This is so funny that you gave the making your bed example because when you said, Organize your space, that is the first thing that came into my mind because I don't know where I heard it, but I heard it a long time ago, and they said, make your bed the beginning of every morning, because no matter what happens throughout your day, when you come back, it's just your bed is made. And there's just this peace and this calm. So I love the fact that that's the example that you use, because it does make a difference. How do we feel like when we walk into an office and there's crap all over the place? How can you feel organized when you're in an environment like that? So I totally understand why this third micro habit is organized your space.

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. And just to add to that now, people are working from home more than ever. So now we have our office in our bedroom or in our living room or in our kitchen. And number one, if we're doing Zoom calls, you don't want everybody else to see your mess.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right. Yeah.

Sharon Grossman
That's just kind of like for professional etiquette. Secondly, if you're now mixing your work and living environments, you want to make sure if you're going to spend that much time in a space, you want to make sure you feel good in that space. It's definitely about making sure things look nice, and then you'll feel nice when you're doing your work.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's the fourth step? I know it starts with P.

Sharon Grossman
You're keeping track.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I'm keeping track.

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. The fourth one is practicing gratitude. Now, when I wrote my book, I did a lot of research on gratitude, and I was amazed at how expansive the research was in terms of the kinds of things that gratitude is good for. But the thing that I like to lead with when it comes to this because people are often like, "Oh, I don't have time for all these things." And that's why I say you can do all these things in, like, 15 minutes a day. Right. But gratitude is something that really can just take a couple of minutes. It doesn't have to take a long time. But what it does is it shifts the focus of your mind from what we're programmed to look for, which is all the things that are negative and wrong to all the things that are positive and right. So let me explain that really quick. So as we've heard a million times, our brain hasn't really adapted since we were these cave dwellers. Right. And so we get into that fight or flight. And the reason for that is to keep us alive. So we're always looking for all the things that could go wrong and all the things that are wrong. And this is how we're wired. But in this day and age, we don't have to be in survival mode. And so what we want to do is train our brain to look for those positives and be able to send a message in there that, "Hey, it's okay. You can be calm. We're safe. Nothing bad is going to happen. And if it does, we'll be able to figure it out. We'll handle it. But let's look at what is going on, really not in our imagination. But what is actually happening." And one of the things that I find is that even when we're burned out, even when we're stressed out and we're unhappy, there are some positives that we're just ignoring, right. Because it just doesn't fit into that model. So I'll give you an example. I had a client reach out, and she was very burned out and resentful and the whole nine. And she's telling me all the things that are wrong with her industry and how it's not her, it's them. And we got to fix the industry. And she's really why do I have to work on myself when it's everybody else and all this kind of stuff. And I said to her, "That may or may not be the case. But let me ask you this. Even though you're feeling burned out about going to work and all the things related to your industry, what's going well?" Right. And she was able to within literally, like, 30 seconds, come up with, like, three things. She's like, "Well, I really like the work that I do. And I like the clients that I work with. And I have great colleagues." I was like, "Great. Now let me ask you what would happen if you went to work every day focusing on those three things versus all the things that are wrong with your industry and all the things you kind of started the conversation with?" And she was like, "Oh, I think I would just feel a lot lighter." Right. And that's really the truth is, not only are we missing out on the things that are already there, that's not to say that there aren't negative things going on, but we're just focusing on half of the pie and there's, like, a whole pie out there. And so let's just balance things out by looking at both sides. Then we don't feel so incredibly lopsided, but also that it allows you to feel lighter, less stressed out. You're just doing yourself a favor, essentially. And if you want those results, you have to train your brain to do it. And this is how we do it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Do you find that the more you practice gratitude, the easier it is to find things you're grateful for?

Sharon Grossman
100%. This is why I encourage people to create a practice around it. So I didn't just say gratitude, but practice gratitude, right? What I find is that if you create and this is what I mean by practice is if you decide that you are going to do this, we're almost at the beginning of the year. So I think this is an important topic to be to start talking about. We talk about goals, and the reason we don't accomplish a lot of things is because we're not very specific. So I always tell people just at least commit to doing something for a period of time. So if you're going to do this gratitude thing, maybe give yourself 30 days and say, every day for the next 30 days, "I'm going to do this gratitude thing where I come up with three things that I'm grateful for from my day, and I'm going to do it at dinner or before I go to bed." Like, pick a time, right. Be very specific. And then what happens is once you've got that, it's become more of a habit because you're always doing it at the same time. And then what it does is you are scanning the environment your entire day for the things that you're going to need to put on your list later, because otherwise you get to the list, you haven't thought about it all then you're like, "What did I do today?" But once you get into the swing of it, you're like, "Oh, I know. I got to put something down on my list. So then now you're more open to things as are happening. And then all of a sudden you find the thing and you're like, That's going on my list tonight." Right. So now it's like you're training your brain to look for the things that have always been there but you weren't paying attention to.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I'm going to tell you a story. This is a very random way that I practice gratitude. But when my wife and I got married, at the rehearsal dinner, our efficient was my best friend's dad, and he told a story about gratitude stones and everybody that was there. He had a bag of rocks and everybody that was there, he gave a rock. That rock has been in my pocket every day since. When I get up in the morning, I put my money clip in my pocket. I put my gratitude stone in my pocket, and I just rub it. And I just think about two or three things that I'm grateful for. Or throughout the day if something pops up and it's got my hand in my pocket and it's on my gratitude stone, it just reminds me to think about something that I'm grateful for. So I think the important thing is to me and tell me if I'm wrong is I don't think it really matters how you do it. You just have to find what works for you so that you get in the habit of practicing it.

Sharon Grossman
Exactly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
We're almost there. We focused on what we can control. We're reviewing our day. We're organizing our space. We're practicing gratitude. What's this fifth micro habit?

Sharon Grossman
This is where we want to eliminate energy drains. So I talked earlier about what it's like or thinking about yourself as a battery. Right. We are a bundle of energy. And throughout the day, we are expanding that energy and different things. Some of it is intentional. Like, I sit down and I do my work, and that takes a bunch of energy. Sometimes I'm talking to somebody and I get stressed out because of that conversation that takes up a bunch of energy. Sometimes they do things and they energize me. So now I'm putting energy back into the battery pack. So what we want to identify is what are the things that are draining your energy? And if you've got a phone or computer nowadays, they have all these alerts that say, like, "Oh, your energy pack or your battery is not working efficiently. This is what you need to do to improve on that. Right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right.

Sharon Grossman
And I think it's like we have to think about ourselves in the same way. So a lot of this has to do with boundaries, but also understanding what are your triggers. And there's a lot of self-awareness that has to come into this. An example might be like we talked about the importance of organizing your space. So if you come into a space and it's completely disorganized and that's an energy drain for you, then a simple solution would be to organize it. Right. So first thing is you have to identify what are the things that are taking energy away from you?

Sharon Grossman
It could be maybe there's something about the way that you work that you don't like to do. There's a task that you're doing that you don't like to do. It takes you a really long time. You find that you're procrastinating on it or that you're kind of having a hard time pulling the trigger on whatever it is. So maybe you work with somebody else and you guys can swap different tasks. It's easy for them to do that task, but there's something that you're really good at that is hard for them. Or maybe if you're working for yourself, you hire somebody to do that task for you so that you can focus on other things that don't take up as much of your energy. Like some people love writing. "I'd love to spend time. I never get to do it. I love to put together like a blog post." And other people are like, "Oh, my God. I have put together a blog post, and I don't even know what to write. And I've got writer's block." So you hire a content writer and you have them do it for you if that's really important to your business, right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Sharon Grossman
You want to find out what are those energy drains and then start eliminating those one by one. And then it's a really easy thing to do once you figure out what it is and what you need to do to eliminate it, because then you start to see where's the ROI. Am I feeling more energized now that I don't have to do that blog article or now that I don't have to edit my content because I've hired somebody to edit it for me, or I've hired a VA to whatever it is, right. Like finding out what those things. And it's not just in your business, but it's also in your life. So I just talked to a client of mine who said she's the VP of her company, and she's very busy. And she's a single mom, and she's like, "I want to eat healthy, but I haven't been eating healthy. So I just signed up for one of those services where they deliver plant-based meals to my house. So I get to eat the things that I think are going to be really good for my body, but I don't have to prepare them. I don't have to figure out how to do it. It just shows up, and I feel really good about doing that for myself. And that's my gift to myself."

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. It's all about having that self-awareness you touched on that. It's super important. And these five micro habits, they're simple, but they're not easy, right? It takes work.

Sharon Grossman
Exactly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And you've got to get in the habit. But they are simple. I mean, we've all heard these before, but I love how you've packaged it. And I can see how if you get these five things dialed in, how much different our days can be.

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. I think you'll have more energy, you'll feel more positive. And if you look at what's on the other side of these five habits, it's everything that burnout is not.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, the exact opposite of burnout.

Sharon Grossman
And that's why we focus on them.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I know these micro habits. How do I get started? What's the first step for somebody that's listening going, "Yeah. Gosh, I've heard this before. Doctor Sharon reminded me of these things. Now I got to take action. How do I get started?"

Sharon Grossman
Well, I always like to tell people one of the most, I would say, important investments that you can make is an investment in your own mind, because study after study shows that when you focus your mind, you get better results often than if you just do something in practice. And that the combination of the two is like the winning combination, right? Whether it's sports or anything else. So what I've done is I've created what I call the Mindset Mastery Starter Kit, which I'm happy to share with your listeners. And that's something that touches on all these different things that we talked about with regards to how you master your mind, whether it's around stress, whether it's about, like, lack of confidence that's leading to imposter syndrome, burnout anxiety, all of these things. I think it's important to understand what's going on in your mind in the first place that is bringing you to this place of negativity. And then from that place of self awareness, you can start to slowly trickle these different micro habits in, and they all will come together for you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Do you recommend people focus on one micro habit at a time?

Sharon Grossman
Absolutely. So I actually teach these micro habits as well as some other ones in my Extraordinary program, which is a twelve-week program. So what I do there is I actually encourage people to just start one thing each week and then add on to it. So by the time they finish the twelve-week program, they've got all these little micro habits stacked up, and they all start to kind of propel them into a space where they're more in control of their lives. They're feeling more positive, their environment is in sync. They have more energy. All of the things start to come together. So I always talk about starting one thing at a time. And because some of these things are really simple, like making your bed, you can handle that and then add another thing after. So you should definitely do it at your own pace. I'm never encouraging you to rush through anything, because the idea is if you want to make it a habit, you want to be able to stick with it. So do it. Maybe for 30 days. And then if it feels like it's really stuck with you, then you can add another thing. So do it in whatever way works best for you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
This has been awesome. I love these micro habits. Any last minute thoughts or words of wisdom you want to leave us with today?

Sharon Grossman
Just that there's really no one way to do things. And if the way everybody else around you is doing life or work, and that doesn't work for you, just find your own way.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Where can people learn more about you? I know we talked about your website, which is Dr. Sharon Grossman dot com. And then you talk about the Mindset Mastery Kit.

Sharon Grossman
Yeah. I like to make things easy for people. So I put everything on my website. So if you're looking for more content, if you're looking for a link to my book, if you're looking for a burnout quiz, any of those things, they're all available right there at drsharongrossman dot com. And if you want to chat with me, there's also a link there for you to do that. So that's the best place to direct people, too.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. You also provided us a Bitly link to the Mindset Mastery Kit. We'll make sure that that is in the show notes. So if you want to go check that out, I would highly recommend you do it. Obviously, in the almost 40 minutes we've been talking, you know what you're doing. You got a firm handle on it. If you are feeling burned out, go reach out to Doctor Sharon. I'm sure she would be more than happy to help you get to a better place. And Doctor Sharon, I want to thank you so much for taking the time. I really appreciate it. I always get awesome information from these conversations, so I am learning as well as everybody else, so I appreciate it.

Sharon Grossman
I love it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And for those of you that are watching listening again, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. If you are not sure what those next right marketing steps are for you to get you where you want to be, hop on over to our website at Rialto Marketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing dot com. Click on the Get a Free Consultation. I would be happy to chat with you and give you some ideas of where you should focus based on where you currently are and where you want to get to. Thanks so much. Until next time. Take care.


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