Focus: The Overlooked Ingredient To Growth

Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience.


Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Rusty Fulling for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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Focus: The Overlooked Ingredient To Growth

Tim Fitzpatrick
Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience. I am Tim Fitzpatrick with the Rialto Marketing where we believe you must remove your revenue roadblocks to accelerate growth and that marketing shouldn't be difficult. Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. I am really excited to actually have Rusty Fulling from Fulling Management and Accounting back on the podcast. Rusty, welcome and thanks for coming back.

Rusty Fulling
Hey, Tim. Man, it's good to see you and always enjoy our time together here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, me too. Last time, if I remember correctly, last time we talked a bit about culture and how you grew your business. Just from a remote standpoint, today we're going to dig a little bit more into the details of just your revenue growth and what's worked and all that. I appreciate you taking the time to share that. Before we jump into that, I want to ask you a few rapid fire questions if you're ready to rock.

Rusty Fulling
All right, I'm ready.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Very quickly, what do you do and how long have you been doing it?

Rusty Fulling
I started Fulling Management and Accounting April first of 2000. April Fool's Day of all days. We provide accounting, CFO, and business coaching services to clients around the country. These are small business owners just to help them really get clarity around their numbers, grow their profits and gain peace of mind.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. You're coming up on an anniversary here, two days.

Rusty Fulling
I know. That's right. From this recording, we're going to be, I think, 23 years into it based on the recording dates. That's right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Good for you. In those 23 years, what's the most important lesson you've learned?

Rusty Fulling
I think perfection is not to be something to be achieved, but it's always you can strive for it. But that is something that I think as an early business owner, it's, hey, we'll get there, we'll get there. I think just being patient is another thing along the way. But it's been really a fun experience. And just the relationships over the years have just been invaluable. I think those are some of the lessons learned along the way.

Tim Fitzpatrick
One of the business groups I used to belong to always talked about implement now, perfect as you go. As you're talking about perfection, I'm a recovering perfectionist. I don't know about you, but...

Rusty Fulling
Yeah, absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
We're far better off taking action and learning from that action and continuing to be better. So I love that. So in 23 years, there's been plenty of ups and downs. When you hit those tough times, do you have a mantra, a saying, something that you either say to yourself or share with your team to push through those times?

Rusty Fulling
Yeah. So in our business now, we are more of a faith based business. And there have been times where we say, hey, you know what? Ultimately, we're not in control of this. God's in control of this. It's interesting. We had a situation just recently where a client was going through a challenge and one of our team members had posted on their office a little quote that said, Let me be the answer to someone else's prayer today. I think sometimes somebody else's answer your prayer. I think just knowing that it's not all about you, that there's a bigger purpose. I think those are probably part of our fallback core values, even. We'd be part of that.

Hiring and Finding Quality People

Tim Fitzpatrick
One of the things that we spoke about before the interview today was talking about hiring and finding quality people. That's one of the things that you're struggling with right now. You are not alone. It's incredibly difficult to find really good people. How are you marketing for new team members?

Rusty Fulling
Definitely the hiring over the last, boy, two, three years definitely has been a little different as opposed to the first 20 years. Just a little different as far as maybe the tried and true places you found good candidates. I'll say this, if people are looking for new candidates, don't rush, don't settle. In the midst of, Hey, I have these business opportunities coming in. Sometimes we need to say no to those until we're staffed accordingly. Those are a couple of things that we've seen internally, we've seen others do is they'll rush into something and then they regret it day one or day 90, and that can be tough to unravel. When you talk about marketing for new team members, honestly, the first thing is just defining the role. I've run across too many business owners that, Well, we have this opening and we need somebody. It's like, Well, what does it look like? Well, we don't really have it written down. Oh, my goodness. Being clear in that role, we've started using language like success statements for this role. In order for this role to be successful, here's what it's going to look like. KRAs or key result areas. That's another way to define the role. Those are a couple of things. Just from a marketing base start is defining the role. Then as far as getting the word out, word of mouth has been probably our most effective way to do that. Referral bonuses within our team. When a team member refers a friend that comes on board, we pay a referral bonus. Social media outlets such as Facebook, LinkedIn, some of those type avenues. We've used career sites like Indeed, Career Builder, Upwork. Then in addition to our website, the other thing we've done is use recruiters. Recruiters, they're not all created equal. It's really important to make sure they understand what you're looking for. Otherwise, you're just getting resumes pushed your way. Making sure you clarify that initial define the roles. So I'm curious on some of the companies you work with, how do you help companies in this area?

Tim Fitzpatrick
As you were talking, there was a couple of things coming to mind here. So I help this isn't super jumbled, but one of the things that you touched on that I wanted to pull out was you were talking about growth. Maybe some of these opportunities that are coming our way, we need to hold off on until we have enough people. That is a valid concern. The last thing you want to do is bring something on and then have that person have a horrible experience. That's not serving anybody. But we have had some clients that have capacity issues. And while they're working through those capacity issues, there are still opportunities to grow because what we can do when somebody is in that case is I would virtually say 100 % of cases, you have people that you are working with that are not ideal clients. When that is the case, when you're attracting leads and you have a capacity issue, all you're trying to do is find the best ideal client and you fire an old client. You replace one with the other. One is a much better client. Typically, there are some attributes about that. One of those attributes a lot of times is they're a higher paying client. You're replacing with somebody that's paying $1,500 a month and now they're paying $3,000 a month. You can call the herd, for lack of a better term, get rid of non ideal clients and replace them with ideal clients when you have capacity issues, still manage to grow. That's one of the things that was coming to mind as you pulled it out. The other thing, you talked about a lot of the tactical things from a marketing standpoint. From a strategic standpoint, a lot of people don't think about recruiting in human resources as a marketing function, but I think at its base level, it is. Because when we get a referral, where are they going? They're not picking up the phone or emailing us right away. They're going online. They're looking at our website, looking at our social channels. Same thing happens with candidates. They go to your website, they want to learn more and see what you're about. And if your website isn't portraying or instilling confidence, if they're having a difficult time understanding what you do, that's not a good experience, right?

Rusty Fulling
Absolutely. yeah, absolutely. I think along that line, when a candidate is looking, one of the effective things we found is creating videos around what it's like to work in our environment. That has been probably one of the biggest generators of those ideal candidates when they get to hear story from some of our existing team members, and they'll refer to that during the interview process. I heard that story about this person. I heard that story and I wanted to be part of the team. So creating that buzz where they're going, Hey, I want part of that. I want to be part of it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And that's no different than what happens on the front end to attract clients. You have a video of about, you may have video testimonials from clients. This is what it was like to work with Fulling Management and Accounting. This is the problem they helped me solve. This is the result and outcomes that I got. You're doing the exact same thing on the recruiting side. Honestly, you can just translate the same marketing stuff on the front end to the backside of the house for recruiting. You're just modifying it a little bit. So when we talk about strategy on the front end with messaging, understanding who your ideal clients are and then creating a message that attracts those people and engages them. It's the same on the recruiting side. Who are your ideal employees? What are their characteristics or team members? Whatever you call them, what are they like? What are their values? What are they looking for? What are their aspirations? Understanding that and communicating that in your HR, your recruiting messages is what's going to resonate with those people. Because there's a gazillion, I need a new accountant. There's a gazillion accounting jobs out there. How are you going to differentiate your business from the rest of them? It's talking about what's important to them and communicating that you have an environment that is attractive to them and a place of business that they want to be a part of. We do ideal client interviews all the time. You can do the same thing with recruiting in HR, except here it's a hell of a lot easier because you're interviewing your team members. And you're just talking to them and you're getting feedback from them. What do they love about working for you, with you? What were they looking for when they started looking for the job? What's it been like? What's the experience been like? What results and outcomes are they experiencing now that they're part of the team? Those are all words of wisdom nuggets that you can get that you can then communicate in your hiring process, in your job ads. Most job ads would put anybody to sleep.

Rusty Fulling
Absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
They don't look at it. Again, it's like creating a Google ad or a Facebook ad to market your business on the front end. A job ad is the exact same way. And most people, it's like, Oh, my God. Hit the snooze button here. So how do you stand out?

Rusty Fulling
Yeah, exactly. That's what I'm saying. How do you stand out in a crowd of... There's a book called Blue Ocean Strategy that talks about getting out of the fray and standing out. I think that... No, those are great insights there. I like that so it sounds like we can amp that up a little bit.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So that's good. Yes. Well, I think there's so many opportunities. And because most people aren't doing this on the recruiting side, I think it's a way for you to create a competitive advantage, differentiate your business from the rest of the pack. And frankly, you're going to attract the type of people that want an environment like that you offer. And you're going to turn away the people that aren't. We don't want to waste our time talking with potential clients that aren't a good fit. We don't want to waste our time talking to potential team members that aren't a good fit either. And our marketing is going to help attract the right people and drive the rest away. I love that. Thank you for sharing your thoughts there.

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The Importance of Having a Marketing Plan

Tim Fitzpatrick
I want to shift gears a little bit. I want to talk about marketing. What marketing tactics have worked well for you and what haven't? A lot of us, way more of them haven't worked than have. And that's okay. I actually had a conversation with somebody yesterday and he was like, Look, all the marketing tactics that I use that didn't work helped me find the ones that did. And the ones that did more than paid for all the failed attempts. So it's all part of the process. But I'm just curious, share with us your experience.

Rusty Fulling
Yeah, my, well, and honestly, that question you just asked, my mind did not go to what's worked well. My mind went to what has not worked because those tend to live in your brain longer and your pocketbook, too, is like, Oh, my goodness. I think of some of those that did not work well in our environment. We're providing more the CFO, the accounting type services. We've done the face to face networking at the Chamber events, the mass mail marketing, radio advertising, client testimonials, written and videos, social media campaigns. We've done a lot of those. We've hired agencies over the years, those experts to help with us. It's interesting. We've done a lot of those different tactics. I really go back to what's worked, and it's building the relationships first because ours is so relational. It's really building that relationship, really one business owner at a time. I know that sounds the tortoise and the hare a little bit, but it's fascinating over the years how the tourist approach actually has started gaining momentum. Maybe we're just been in it long enough to see that, but it's been fascinating. It's very much the like, know, and trust approach. Let me get to know you, let me get to know you. Okay, I like you. Okay, now I trust you. And for our services, it's like somebody handing you their checkbook. I don't know if people use checkbooks anymore, but handing you their checkbook and saying, Hey, I want you to manage this. You're not going to do that with a complete stranger. And so you need to get to know somebody like them and then trust them before you're handing that off. So for us, the most effective has been that approach.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What types of things are you doing to build that relationship over time?

Rusty Fulling
So sometimes I'd say over the last few years, it's probably been more online developing relationships and in business groups. It could be Facebook groups, business leaders. Maybe it's a forum where people are asking questions, and we're just giving guidance and not a charge for that. It's just guidance and helping them along the way. It's just building, again, that rapport. There's some business round table groups where they're not geared for networking. They're geared for let's share expertise around the table, help each other in their business challenges and successes. Again, it's building that rapport. Those are some of the avenues that have worked well for our environment.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Are you using email marketing at all as people come into your?

Rusty Fulling
We do newsletters, we do blogs, we do consistent social media posts that are going out daily. A lot of that is that name recognition, I would call it, just keeping your name out there. Then people, Hey, we've had people call up and say, Hey, I've gotten your content for years, and hey, I'd really like to talk to you. Well, if we wouldn't have been sending that, we would have been out of sight out of mind.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I'm so thankful that you brought that up because I was going to talk about that because so many people think about it.

Rusty Fulling
I want to hear what you're always doing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, it's like so many people talk about building the relationship, but like you said, it takes time. It's easy to overlook a lot of the things that you just shared. One is you guys are patient, you are consistent with what you're doing and you're giving it time to work because it depends on the statistic, but I hear anywhere from like 5 to 10 % of your audience, your market is ready to buy at any given point in time. And if that's the case, when people come into your world, most of them aren't going to be ready to buy. So if they're not ready to buy, what are you doing to stay top of mind? Email marketing is a great way to do that, to just stay top of mind. I had a guy that I talked to, probably maybe a year ago or so, who actually responded to one of our emails the other day saying, Hey, you may not remember me. We talked about this. I have another business. I need some outside eyes and hope. Would you be interested in chatting with me? Again, that conversation never would have happened had I not been consistently sending out information just to help people via email. Those things happen all the time. It's that combination of things. You're creating content that people find valuable. You're interacting with groups. You're sending out consistent emails. It's all of those things working in concert with each other that is the power. You got to just take the time. You touched on it. Know, like, trust. When I think about the customer journey, I subscribe to the John Jantsch Duct Tape Marketing methodology. He talks about the customer journey being an hourglass. And at the top of the hourglass, it's know, like, trust, try, buy is the middle of the hourglass, and then at the bottom is repeat and refer. So there's seven steps to the customer journey, and a lot of people stop it by. Well, if you stop at buy, you're missing repeat and refer, which is a huge source of business for most people. But the top of that buyer's journey, know like trust. When you're in B2B professional services, how do you build trust with people? It's putting content out there that's adding value, but also highlighting your skill set, your expertise. And that does not happen overnight. You have to be consistent and you have to be patient. Too many people think short term with marketing and give up long before they're ever going to expect to see results.

Rusty Fulling
Yeah, I was going to say, how do you talk people off the cliff when they're going, okay? Tim, I've been doing this for two weeks now. Come on, I'm not seeing results. What's the deal?

Tim Fitzpatrick
For me, it's more of a upsetting the expectation up front. Because look, there are a lot of marketers out there that over promise and under deliver. Hey, I'm going to get you on page one of Google, or, Hey, we're going to get you five qualified appointments a month, or whatever it may be. Most people aren't used to hearing the reality of it, which we already touched on one of them is most marketing you do is not going to work. But two, I do my best to set the expectation up front. When we talk about ideal clients, our ideal clients understand this mindset of marketing is an investment. It is not an expense. You can't just cut it. It's an investment that you do every month, just like your 401k. We've got to be doing this consistently. They know that it's a long term investment. If they don't subscribe to that, then they're not going to be a good fit.

Rusty Fulling
I'm curious, how do you know when to pivot your marketing tactics?

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's a really good question. A lot of people don't know when to pivot because they either don't have a plan and or they haven't outlined what they need to measure, what metrics they need to track to help guide the decisions that they make. We've got to have a plan and we have to understand what our goals are with each activity that we're taking and then outline what we're going to track that's going to help give us an indication of whether those things are working or not. So when we do marketing planning, we do it in 90 day sprints. It keeps things simple. 90 days is long enough to start seeing traction. It doesn't mean that you're going to see what the true results are going to be, but it's long enough to start seeing traction, but it's short enough where you can start to make course corrections. Because when people plan, like yearly planning, our businesses are changing too quickly and the market is evolving too quickly and our marketing needs to be able to evolve with that. Nobody's year long marketing plan is the same at the end of the year as it was at the beginning. And to me, if that's the case, then why the hell are you taking the time to create a long, complex plan? Keep it short, keep it simple, 90 day sprints, identify what the metrics are going to be, and then at the end of the 90 days, you can look at what the data is telling you. And you may not know 100 % hey, is this going to work or not? But you do start to get a picture of, hey, are we getting traction? Are we not? And that doesn't necessarily mean that you give up. Sometimes you might, but in most cases, 90 days is not long enough period of time for anything. You look at the data and go, okay, what changes do we need to make? And then you make the changes and you wash, rinse, repeat.

Rusty Fulling
There you go. So I heard you say short, simple, and maybe you had the word fresh. So you're doing your freshening up at the end of each quarter. So I like that. So you're continually tweaking or continually freshening up the marketing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You're optimizing all the time.

Rusty Fulling
I like that.

Why You Should Hone In on Your Ideal Clients

Tim Fitzpatrick
So what do you think has been the biggest impact on your growth So far?

Rusty Fulling
Biggest impact? Yeah. I think back to early on when we first started, we were offering everything... Well, I don't know if we were officially offering everything from, We'll do your website, we'll do your accounting, we'll wash your car, we'll do... Just anything to just get the business going. I think part of the impact is saying, Okay, here's what we're going to do. Here's what we're good at. Here's how we can best help. One of it is just defining our services. What are we good at? The second thing I think that's really helped is defining our ideal client. And so many times people don't always take this, take time to do this. And it's really taking time to say, Who do we best serve? And so we came up with a couple of personas that we call Bio Bob and Bio Beth.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. I'm going to share this. You shared this with me. Let me just get this on the screen here. Cool. For those of you that are listening, we'll make sure the link to this is in the show notes. But we'll also talk through it. This page that we're showing is actually, this is on your website.

Rusty Fulling
It is. It's funny. We sat down as a team, so our staff sit down, and we just got a big whiteboard out and started listing attributes of clients that we've worked with over the last several years that we really enjoyed, that we saw impact, positive impact on. We just started listing all these attributes. Then we started of the leader first. We started attributes about the leader. Then we went and we said, Okay, what about their company? What are some attributes about their company? The size of company, what software they're using, how many employees, and then what were some of their pain points? As we were putting this list together, you could almost see a person or persona popping out. That's where we came up with these two characters, the Bio Bob and Bio Beth. For our company, we really focus first on that leader quality. We're looking for leaders that are typically the founder. They're highly educated, they're creative, progressive, innovative in their field. Definitely that high integrity piece. We really look for people in those descriptors first. If they're checking those boxes, then we go to the right side of the ledger and we're looking for companies that are in that 1 to 20 million a year in revenue, 1 to 50 employees. They're typically going to use QuickBooks or something along that line. This just really helps clarify, not only for our internal team, but also for maybe referral partners or people we may make them in contact with.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love this. Again, there's a few things I want to pull out here. Biggest driver of growth, I'm hearing you say, is focus. Focusing on the right type of of clients and focusing on the right types of services. We can't be great at everything. We can't be all things to all people. We've got to focus. I had a conversation with somebody within the last month or so, and I remember him saying, he's like, Once we decided to focus, our business completely changed. So I love the fact that you're sharing this and everything from a marketing standpoint starts with your ideal clients. I call them the three power questions. Super easy way to hone in on this for a business that's been in business for a while is who do you love working with? Who are your most profitable clients and who do you get great results for? If you can work with people that check those three boxes day in, day out, man, your business is a dream. Your clients are going to stay with you. They're going to want to refer you. You're making money and there's nothing wrong with making money. To serve people at the highest level, you have to be profitable. And you're working with clients that you love working with. When you ask yourself those three questions, and it sounds like you guys went through a similar process where you're just like, Hey, who are our best clients? Who do we love working with? Who are we getting good results for? Let's just start a list. And once we've got that list, now we can start to dig deeper into what are the attributes that... Or are there subgroups from this that share attributes? Those subgroups oftentimes are your ideal clients. But you have some demographic information in here. You also have just some psychographic information. The psychographic is what's in their head. What are they like as a person? What do they value? What's important to them? What problem do they have? Pain points? What results are they looking for? All those things are really important. You guys have kept this very simple. I have seen people go really deep on ideal client profiles. I've seen them keep it very simple. I don't think there's a right or wrong way to it as long as it's something that you're going to use. If it's too complicated and you don't use it, then you wasted time. I love the fact that, honestly, Rusty, I have not seen anybody that put this on their website. I love the fact that you have it on your website. Throughout the buyer's journey, do you send this to people or do you share it with people? How do you use it?

Rusty Fulling
We have, yes. We've sent We've shared this with, could be a prospective client, and we've had some that said, Oh, I don't fit your categories, or I'm not. That's fine. That's helpful. A self selection a little bit there. Just referral partners are great because they can look at this and say, Ah, yeah, this is a great referral. So it's been fun. We've been at places where people say, Oh, there's the Bio Bob people, or the Bio Bob guy. And so the personas have taken on a little bit of life of their selves on this. But it definitely helps our internal staff know, too, if there's an opportunity comes along our way, inside the business, people can say, Hey, wait, wait, wait, wait. That doesn't fit our ideal client, does it? There's a little bit of self accountability built into doing this exercise. You had mentioned, I love those questions you're asking about, do you love to work with them? Are they profitable? and are they getting great results? We read a book, it's been a handful of years ago, called the pumpkin plan.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, Mike McAllen.

Rusty Fulling
We took those three questions a little bit from that book. Another big impact on growth, and you addressed it earlier in our talk, was pruning, sometimes, those smaller pumpkins or those clients that maybe are not the best fit. They were 10 years ago, but maybe they're not today. Doing that exercise has been helpful to just make sure clients are taken care of well and they're being served maybe by a company that's going to serve them better than what we might. That's another way to approach those. But the pumpkin plan would definitely be a good read for those that might be interested in that.

Focus: The Overlooked Ingredient To Growth (Conclusion)

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. I love it. What's next? What are your priorities for 2023?

Rusty Fulling
We, as a team, we bring everybody in from our team once a year for a couple of day off site. We talk about this, like, what's our big rocks? What's our big priorities for the next year? And for 2023, we're focused on client and team member experience. Client and team member experience. And what that looks like is how do we create raving fans from our clients and from our team members? And so what's really neat when you develop those objectives, you want to put some momentum behind that. And every week during our staff meetings, we share stories and shoutouts either from clients or from team members about services that are being provided among our team. And so it's so cool. Just something simple. We had a team member who was meeting with a client. The client said, Hey, I'm not able to meet next week because my kid's having a Valentine's party at their elementary school. Our team member thought, Hey, you know what'd be fun is to send them a whole packet of Valentine's cards to pass out for the kids. Well, that was a $20 investment. That just meant the world to this young business owner mom that we could take the time out to do something just a little like that. It doesn't have to be anything big, but it's just continuing to build that relationship.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that. I think you're creating retention by doing that. If you do it well, you're going to increase retention. And as you were talking through it, I had an interview three or four weeks ago with Al Alper at Cyber Guard 360, and he was talking about their shock and awe box, which they send this to people before they actually have the initial discovery meeting with a potential client. That client experience doesn't just start when they buy. It's the beginning of the marketing process. We've got to remember that. But they use this shock and awe box, and he showed it to me and it's a small box, but there's a number of different things in there that they send. Somebody schedules a meeting, they send it and they've got it before that first meeting. What a huge differentiator. He said when they started doing it, their close rate went up significantly. He's like, Man, it's very rare for us to not close a potential client as they go through our process. You're starting that client experience off on the right foot. If you just keep putting some of those little things throughout the entire process, little things. I actually have an interview coming up with a woman who talks about relationship building, and she does it through just simple things, cards. She sends out cards, but not for what you would think. You're a father, you get a card on Father's Day. As she's developing the relationship, she's just paying attention and listening to the little things where she might be able to send somebody a card. She just sends cards out. She gave an example of a one year anniversary for a client, and you send out a card on them, Hey, it's been a year that we've been working together. Nobody does that. It's just all the little things, and those little things add up significantly. So I love that. You're going to come up with all... I'm sure you're going to come up with all kinds of stuff as you start to work through this process. Rusty, I have enjoyed chatting with you once again. You shared a ton of valuable insight. I've got one more question before we wrap up, and that is this, knowing what you know now, is there anything you would do differently?

Rusty Fulling
It might be marketing in specific or just in general?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Anything.

Rusty Fulling
Anything. Oh, my goodness. So many lessons. I think some of it is, again, being more intentional about listening to clients and team members. It's just amazing hearing other stories. I think if I were to do anything different, going back, spending more time in that. That's the season I'm in now is just capturing those stories. That helps you get to know people and serve them better.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where can people learn more about you?

Rusty Fulling
Hey, love to connect. Our website, Fullingmgmt.com. Mgmt. Com, so Fullingmgmt.com, or you can just go out to rustyfulling.com and see my profile from there. So yeah, love to connect.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. Rusty, thank you for taking the time again. This is a great conversation. I know people get a lot of value from what we talked about today. Guys, if you want to connect with Rusty, please go over to fullingmgmt.com or rustyfulling.com and connect. It is always a pleasure to chat with him. I can vouch for that. Thank you again, Rusty, I appreciate it. For those of you that are watching and listening, I appreciate you as well. We've been talking about a lot of different marketing stuff today. Some of the common roadblocks. Rusty talked about ideal clients and target market. We talked a little bit about messaging. These are two of the big revenue roadblocks that we help people remove so they can accelerate growth. If you want to find out which of the nine are slowing down your growth, you can do that over revenueroadblockscorecard.com, or you can always connect with us over at rialtomarketing.com. Thank you so much. Until next time, take care.


Connect With Rusty Fulling



About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

Tired of marketing that doesn't deliver? Ready to create lasting marketing success?

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