How Professional Service Providers Can Effectively Use Content Marketing To Generate Leads

December

2

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One of my mentors, John Jantsch at Duct Tape Marketing says content isn’t king, it’s air. How can you ensure you are doing content marketing right? My guest today, Frank Olivo with Sagapixel, is a content marketing and SEO specialist. We're going to tackle and answer this question.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Frank Olivo for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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How Professional Service Providers Can Effectively Use Content Marketing To Generate Leads



Tim Fitzpatrick
One of my mentors, John James at Duct Tape Marketing says content isn't king, it is air. If content is that important to our businesses, how can we ensure that we're going to get it right? My guest today is a content marketing and SEO specialist and this is the exact topic that we are going to tackle. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe you have got to remove your revenue roadblocks if you want to accelerate revenue growth. Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. I am super excited to have with me today Frank Olivo from Sagapixel. Frank, welcome and thanks for being here, man.

Frank Olivo
Thanks for having me, Tim.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, I am excited to dig into this. Content marketing is such an important topic. Before we jump into it, Frank, I want to ask you some rapid fire questions to help us get to know you. You ready to rock and roll?

Frank Olivo
Oh yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Frank Olivo
Mostly playing with my kids.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. How old?

Frank Olivo
I have a four year old and a six year old, so a lot of soccer, a lot of running around in the backyard.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. Awesome. Well, they grow up fast. I have an eleven and twelve year olds and it doesn't seem like it was that long ago they were born. What's your hidden talent?

Frank Olivo
Well, I was a musician, so I play guitar and I sing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
How long do you still do it? Occasionally?

Frank Olivo
Not really. My free time is trying to get a workout in when I can and just playing with kids, honestly. I used to play a lot. I toured, I played at Citizens Bank Park about ten years ago for one of the Phillies games. But yeah, these days it's really just running Sagapixel and raising kids.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What kind of music did you play?

Frank Olivo
I played bachata. Dominican music.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. What does success mean to you?

Frank Olivo
It means achieving one's goals, whether that is running a successful company or growing a healthy family.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Frank Olivo
I would say probably somewhere in southern Italy or in the Dominican Republic.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. Any like, favorite spot in Italy?

Frank Olivo
Probably pool. Yeah. My grandfather's family was from a place called Body and we stayed in touch with like distant cousins that are all about my age and throughout my 20's used to travel as frequently as possible there to go hang out with summer and have fun with my distant cousins and so forth. And it's really a beautiful, beautiful area that not too many people know about.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So my company, Rialto Marketing, is named after the Rialto Bridge in Venice.

Frank Olivo
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
A lot of people who have never been there have no idea. So it's always interesting when people are like, oh yeah, the Rialto Bridge. I'm like, okay, cool, yeah, you've been there.

Frank Olivo
I knew the reference as soon as I saw it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. That's awesome. I love it. What qualities do you value and the people you spend time with?

Frank Olivo
Empathy. Just being able to understand other people and feel what they feel. It's just a quality that I value very much.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Before we jump into content marketing, tell us more about what you're doing at Sagapixel.

Frank Olivo
Yeah, so we're a digital marketing agency. We handle SEO, web design, PPC. The majority of the work that we do is SEO, mostly for healthcare providers. We have done a lot of work with professional services similar to the kinds of clients that you serve. The area where we shine happens to be content marketing. I think it's one of those areas of marketing that is everybody thinks they know how to do, and then they do it, and then they don't understand why they're not getting results. There are very subtle differences between content that's going to drive the bottom line and the type of content that will just get visitors to your website.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So content is a main driver in what you're doing with your SEO services?

Frank Olivo
Yeah, we do have clients that are just targeting geographic areas. We do have clients that just need to rank for Chiropractic City, for example. But the one area, I think that there are a number of SEO agencies out there that do that well. There are many fewer that do the content marketing part well.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, there's so many different moving pieces with SEO. I think people that aren't familiar with SEO don't really think of content marketing and SEO being intertwined, but they are very much that way. So I'm excited to dig into this. As you mentioned, we're really going to talk about content marketing for professional service providers today. But a lot of what we're going to talk about, I'm sure, is appropriate to anyone that's getting involved in content marketing. But as we dig into this, how can professional service businesses drive qualified traffic through their blog?

Frank Olivo
Ultimately it comes down to answering the questions that your target customer has and that they're going on Google to research, to find an answer to, and not only ranking on that page in Google and getting that traffic, but also writing it in a way where you're really demonstrating that you know this topic better than anyone and that there's no one better than you, more qualified than you, to help them with what their problem is. Now with professional services, just to give some examples here, people have a lot of questions. Like right now, as business owners, people have questions about, again, for an accountant, for example, employee retention credits, R and D credits. These are topics, in particular the RND credits that I have a lot I don't quite understand as a business owner and I'm interested in. As I'm googling this topic and researching different angles of it and asking the different questions that I have, the websites that I land on have a prime opportunity aside from just, let's say, pixeling me and retargeting me with ads afterwards to try to get me into their sales funnel, because that is definitely an advantage. But when I'm on the page, the way that they craft their content can be done in a way that gets me to book a call with them. It can be telling them that, prompting them that they shouldn't be that we should not be just trying to figure this out on our own by reading random blogs on the internet. But, you know, you can get a 15-minute call with me if you click here. We had a call, I almost retained an attorney earlier this year with our previous landlord. Before our building was sold, the HVAC system was nonfunctional, like 40 something degrees in our office. What did I do? I Googled. What are the laws in New Jersey? Where did I land? On a lawyer's website, and in there he had a button. He had a button that said to book a 15 minutes free consultation. And if our landlord had not resolved the issue, I probably would have retained this attorney to help us all from him answering a question.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. One of the common roadblocks I see with people who are just getting into content marketing is like, what do I write about? And you've given them a great idea here of answering those questions that people are asking. But are there tools that you guys use or that you would recommend that will help them start to identify what these questions actually are?

Frank Olivo
Yes, there are a few of them. So if you have a pen nearby, start jotting them down. There's one called Answer the Public.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Love that one.

Frank Olivo
That's a great one that you can start with. There's another tool that is an old tool that I think a lot of SEOs have forgotten about that has a more safe for work name now called the Keywordsheeter. Keywordsheeter.com in mind autosuggest. So when you're typing stuff in Google it, auto completes your sentences based on what you're most likely going to be searching at that point. It's really great for mining just queries that people are performing on Google, many of which are overlooked by the Semrushes and AHrefs of the world. And it's called the keyword sheets, like keyword sheeter. And it used to have a much more vulgar name to it that SEO would know it by. And then aside from that, you also have Ahrefs and SEMrush, which everybody is using. They are great tools. The downside to them is if you're in a competitive market, there's a good chance that all of your competitors are using them. And you're fighting in a red ocean right there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. The other thing that I also tell people, if you have salespeople, customer service people, then they're getting questions from clients all the time. So that's another simple, easy way. Like what's coming into your email inbox what kind of conversations are people having. That's a great way to do it too, and get some ideas. What about Google Trends? Is Google Trends a good place to kind of identify the trend or the popularity of a particular topic or keywords?

Frank Olivo
Yes. The great thing with Google Trends is that it can help you to uncover things that none of the tools things that are merging, the things that none of the tools are picking up. Two months into the pandemic, there was still no data in any of the major SEO tools about COVID for example. You could have uncovered some of that stuff from Google Trends. Problem is though, that Google Trends is not ever going to get you as specific as a question. Like how much would my revenue have had to have dropped in order to qualify for employee retention credit? You're never going to find a question like that in Google Trends, but you may find something like that using the keyword sheeter.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Keyword sheeter. I love it. That's a new one for me. I have never heard of that. So I'm going to be checking that one out. Now, when I initially posed this question, I talked about it in reference to a blog, which typically is going to be written content. Does it have to be written content? Can it be podcast? Can it be video? What are your thoughts there? Or if you're shooting video or audio, can you transcribe it and still have it be effective in the written form?

Frank Olivo
Yes. I love video. I think there's a higher barrier to entry for it. So it's almost like where blogging was in 2005. It's a lot easier to rank on YouTube than it is on Google for a lot of searches. You also have a lot of subject areas where video just better lends itself to the subject matter. So having a video is great. One of the things that we've started doing for our own blog is a lot of the articles that get a lot of traffic. I've started shooting videos to go along with it and basically using the same outline from the I'm not reading a script. I'm basically going down the outline that we use to write the article and shooting video right here at my desk and then embedding that into the article as well as YouTube. So if somebody's performing searches on YouTube, they find us there. Sometimes the YouTube videos show up in the search engine results, and then other times we have somebody that maybe they don't want to read a 2000 word article, but they'll watch a five minute video.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, got it. Let's say, because you and I both know this, creating blog posts, it's a lot of work. It takes time, it takes a lot of effort. Some people would much rather just jump on video and talk about it. In that case, can they use the video as the beginning of their process and then transcribe that to get the written word on the page and then optimize that from a written content perspective?

Frank Olivo
Yes, absolutely. The key, the most important thing to make sure that you get right is to have an outline ahead of time. Don't just free hand it because you're going to miss a lot of the subtopics that are already ranking on Google, for example. Now we have articles on our website, and we have clients that have done the same thing. One of our clients, actually, it's a law firm in Pennsylvania. By far, the 80% of their traffic goes to a video that we shot in his office explaining a specific process in his area of law. This article, it was exactly that. We shot the video. We got a transcription done, and that's a majority of his traffic is for that, and it probably took 10 minutes to shoot.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So you said something really, really important here, having an outline, whether you're creating a blog post, doing audio, doing video, having that outline, because as an SEO, when you guys create those outlines, you're looking at not only are you trying to optimize the title, but the article for specific keywords, you're creating subheads that are optimized. So if you're going to shoot a video, you just want to make sure that you don't miss any of those important subheaders so that you can optimize the transcription.

Frank Olivo
Yeah. So there are a couple of parts. All of that is correct. I would add also that Google has gone way beyond just seeing what keywords are on the page. A lot of what they're determining is what is the level of expertise of the person that wrote this piece of content, which is very easily identified through AI, as well as identify how comprehensive a piece of content is. So if we're doing getting back to the employee retention credit topic, there are going to be an article that mentions that possibly mentions like, the legislation that got this started or that includes graphics or that talks about a lot of the subtopics. In the context of this employee retention credit, google is likely to notice that they're giving information that nobody else is giving, and for better or worse, are going to include that in its calculation, in its determination of what is the best piece of content for this.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. Yes. Google, the algorithm has gotten much smarter and much more sophisticated than it was even five to eight years ago.

Frank Olivo
Yeah. And I would also add that it's going to help, putting together an outline is going to help you to make sure that you're covering all your bases. Let's even if Google weren't a consideration, you should still have an outline just so that you can better prep yourself and make sure that you're covering the topic, you're covering everything you need to cover.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. I love it. So what's the difference between content that can actually drive qualified traffic and content that can't or isn't? What are the differences there.

Frank Olivo
So the biggest mistakes that we see when people are producing content that aren't really like professionals, let's say first is that the content doesn't target a query. They'll do topics like, let's say for a family law attorney for tips for divorce. Unless people are googling tips for when you get divorced, which they're really not in great volume, you're not really going to be able to drive qualified traffic. The other thing is if you cannot serve the customers that are googling this, like, let's say for example, a plumber had to unclog a toilet. If you're in Maine and you're getting traffic from all across the country for how to unclog a toilet, you're never going to be able to turn those into plumbing jobs. And in addition to that, the intent behind a search like how to unclog a toilet doesn't indicate that they're looking to hire a plumber in the first place. They're probably just looking to do it themselves. So you're probably not going to be able to get in. Even if you were a national plumbing company, odds are you're not going to be able to drive to turn that traffic into leads. Now, there are some arguments for making it that it can generate positive user signals or develop your brand and so forth. And those are valid points. However, those are the topics you should be getting to when you're scraping the bottom of the barrel. There's stuff that you can do that will do accomplish both of those things and drive qualified traffic. So that should really be the place to go. So the types of qualified traffic that can be driven are getting back to the accountant example that I keep giving, I know they're working like crazy to get leads out about this. Again, the employee retention credits. I see the ads all over the place. I've had a bunch of them cold call us and cold email us. An accountant that's answering a question like, what is employee retention credit? Maybe on the buyer's journey, it's probably further up the funnel. Then a query that's answering the question like I gave earlier, like, how much, how do I know if I qualify for employee retention credits? That's somebody that wants help. You need to answer that question. There are other I mean, the IRS is arguably one of the most difficult organizations on the planet to navigate.

Frank Olivo
An accountant just needs to figure, find out, use these tools that are available to find out what our business owners googling about the small business tax codes, everything that someone would need to know, I had a couple of years ago, I don't remember specifically what it was, but I had some forms I'd never heard of and how do I calculate this thing? And I would have loved to have landed on one of those blogs and found out I can pay somebody $2,000 to do this. Great, where do I mail the check?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right?

Frank Olivo
But at the time, I just wasn't finding it. And it was an example that stuck with me all these years because no accountant had done a good job of covering that topic and being able to drive a lead with it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, so I want to make sure I got this right. So to drive qualified traffic, there's a couple of things that I heard you say here that I think are really important and I want to make sure I get it right so that people who are watching and listening get it right. You've got to make sure that the content is targeting queries or search terms that people are using. On top of that, you also need to consider the intent of those search terms.

Frank Olivo
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Did I get that right?

Frank Olivo
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, got it. I love it. So we know we have to target queries or search terms. Let's say we find some. How can we determine whether we even have a shot at ranking right? Because that's I think is another thing. People go for search terms that are just super competitive. They're never going to rank for it. How do we do this? How do we figure it out?

Frank Olivo
So this is an area that I don't think even people in SEO, I don't think a lot of SEOs are great at this. They tend to sometimes give up too quickly because they'll look at so first of all, there are tools like Moz, Ahrefs, SEMrush that have a measurement of the strength of the overall backlink profile of the website. And we try to use that as a proxy for how authoritative we think Google thinks this website is. When we see without if you don't have access to one of those tools to look at these numbers, like if your website's in the single digits and everything is 90 plus one of those tools, odds are that's a sign that it may be very difficult. The next step that you need to take, however, is to see are they answering the question like sometimes you may have it may happen to be that the Wall Street Journal has an article that's sort of in passing semimensions of a topic that you could write a dedicated 1500 word article about. And you can often outrank those websites with those. I see it, we see it all the time. It's just a matter first of making sure that you're going to be able to add something substantially better. And that doesn't mean longer, it just means better, more comprehensive than the stuff that's already ranking, that's more relevant to the query than the stuff that's already ranking. But another part, but the flip side to that is if the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Health Line are all the number one, two and three spots for a query and you see that their writing is exactly what I would be writing, move on. And the way that you move on can be just exploring a completely different route, sometimes by exploring the auto suggests. So after you perform that query, click in the search box and see what else is getting autopopulated and then do the same thing for those queries. And eventually you may end up finding what we call a longtail query or long tail keyword. That is not something that is being like very comprehensively and thoroughly covered by the search engine results. Or you may find something that like, yeah, it's like a 90 90. And then you see a domain rating using Href scores of like 15. That's often an indicator that you may have a shot at the rank for. Another thing to keep an eye out for, if you see quora or reddit or anything like ranking for that, my experience has been that that's usually easy to rank for. They Google if they're to the point of throwing forum answers in the top results. More times than not, you can rank for it as well, regardless of your domain metrics.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, I love that tip about quoraand reddit. I want to summarize this again because there was a ton of awesome information in there. So the easiest place to just start to determine whether you have a shot at ranking is just going into Google and typing in the keyword or the query and seeing who's ranking. If they are huge websites, wellknown, companies in the search results, that's a big negative there. It doesn't mean that you can't rank, but it means that it's probably going to be pretty hard. But you can also dig in and look at those articles to see like, are they actually really good articles? Are they answering the questions well? If they're not, there might be an opportunity there. But just know that you're competing against a site that Google sees as having very high authority.

Frank Olivo
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I've never heard anybody say anything about Quora or Reddit. That's a great tip. So what we really want to look for are those queries where there's not as much competition. When you look at domain authority, for people that aren't familiar with domain authority, it goes from one to 100 being the highest, what, some of the best websites out there, what, in the low 90s?

Frank Olivo
Something like that? Yeah, I would say like a New York Times is like in the low 90s in like a regional newspaper like the Courier Post in South Jersey where we're headquartered, I think has a low 70s. Just to give you an idea of where you should land for this. Like a typical law firm ranking in a primary, like, top ten market in the United States probably has these metrics, at least in the teens, often higher, depending on, again, how competitive that area. Personal injury isn't the same as, like, immigration competitive.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. So for the average business, smaller business, if you're in like that 30 to 50 range, from a domain authority standpoint, that's fairly strong, is it not?

Frank Olivo
Yeah, that's strong. And in most cases, as long as you're writing really good content and your website is structured in a way where you're really passing internal link equity over to those articles, optimally you should have a shot at ranking for a lot of the stuff that you want to go for. We started working with a telemedicine, a brand new website, last fall was last September, and I mean, there were literally nothing, and within 90 days, we were there competing with Healthline and WebMD for queries and beating them. We have another telemedicine client that we're working with that we have outranking Wikipedia for the medication that they provide, that they used for their treatment. And mind you, they have a domain rating, like 20s, they're definitely not in the, like, Wikipedia.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So is that another thing that people can look for too, is when they see who's ranking for a search query? If there are other businesses in the top ten that do have lower domain authority, is that a signal too that gosh, I might have a shot at ranking for this?

Frank Olivo
Absolutely. And if you don't have access to an SEO tool, just look at who it is. I remember seeing for that same client, for that telemedicine client, like a random OB GYN in the Midwest somewhere that was on page one alongside Healthline and WebMD for whatever keywords we were looking at. And that just screamed to me that we'll be able to rank for this.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. For those that Frank, you've touched on, you know, AHrefs, SEMrush, Ubersuggest is another one that's getting really popular, and I think Uber suggest has a free version that people could use. I don't know how limited it is, but that might be worth checking out if you're trying to do this on your own. So you touched on this with the telemedicine company that you just talked about, where you've got results for them fairly quickly. With content, that's not always the case. Is there a general rule of thumb or recommendation that you make to clients about, hey, when you're getting into content, you need to be committed, right? And you need to be committed for a certain period of time. Is there like a window that you think is fairly accurate to say, hey, within X amount of time you should start to see some traction.

Frank Olivo
Believe it or not, I'm going to give you an answer that's a lot shorter than the typical answers that you get. Like most SEO agencies will tell you three to six months or six to twelve months. I've seen a lot of times where we just did a really good job with the content that we wrote it, and as soon as within weeks of it getting indexed, it was getting traffic. That was the case with both of those telemedicine platforms that I mentioned. I can also tell you, back in 2018, over a weekend, I had this blog about home recording that just over a weekend. I don't know what got into me. I sat down and I wrote like ten articles about different, like, recording plugins. I remember some of them more about like, best vocal plugins or best compressors for vocals or something along those lines. And that's it. I just sat down, wrote all this stuff over weekend. I mean, this is the kind of stuff that like, Sam Ash and Guitar Center are trying to rank for. I just sat down, wrote all these articles. I made sure that they were comprehensive. I did what we do for our clients, and then I just let it sit. No link building, nothing. It was literally a blog that I just put up and didn't touch the thing for the longest time. And we just saw it. The traffic just go up and up and up and up for these like ten or so articles on the website. So it was really just a more question of demonstrating expertise, really covering the topic more comprehensively than anyone else. And in that case, including personal experiences, which is something that Google wants. It wants reviews from people that have actually used the tools and not just their affiliate marketers that are just writing about a topic. In the case of both of those telemedicine providers, the article was written by somebody that really knew what they were talking about. It was reviewed and heavily edited by a doctor. And when it went up, Google was able to tell that this was very well written content and it got traffic literally within weeks of going up.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So what I'm hearing you say is you can actually get traction quickly if the articles are strong enough and you're targeting the right queries.

Frank Olivo
Yes. And just emphasizing on that first point that the person that's writing it really knows what they're talking about.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, got it. This has been awesome. I have one more question about content. A lot of people talk about content hubs or pillar pages with SEO. What are your thoughts on that? Do you guys use that as a tool in what you're doing or what's the deal?

Frank Olivo
Absolutely. First of all, for users, I can tell you that we see it in our own HubSpot. We see it in our clients analytics, where if a person comes to a website like, let's say, for getting back to the account and employee retention credit question. If you're answering a very specific question about qualifying for this, that same person likely has other questions about other topics that are very closely related. And as they're reading that article on the sidebar, they see following them a question, a topic that would be of interest to them. There's a good chance that you're going to get them over to other articles that could end up pushing them down the pipeline. I've seen on our website, specifically, the way we organized it was around industry. So if we've written an article about marketing for plastic surgeon, the feed the related articles are not necessarily let's say we did an article on SEO for plastic surgeons. We're not going to show them a whole bunch of SEO articles on the side. We're actually going to be showing them other marketing for Plastic surgeons articles because someone that's interested in reading about SEO for plastic surgeons may be interested in learning about Google Ads or view acquisition or whatever conversion rate optimization. And I see in HubSpot just these leads that have come in that read one article and then they end up clicking and reading the others on the sidebar. Aside from the human aspect and just the engagement that can be driven, google is trying to see whether a website is a trusted resource for a specific topic. I could be wrong here, but from what I've seen, I don't think they're necessarily getting as they're diving in as deeply into like the very specifics of whether your website is an expert source for anything that has to do with employee retention credits. I think it's probably more along the lines of accounting or maybe even accounting for small businesses. I wouldn't recommend that a website that's doing content about accounting all of a sudden decide to try to put out content about business development for small businesses.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, so it needs to be relevant. But you gave a great example there about you might create a main page that's the pillar or the hub about marketing for plastic surgeons, and then you've got the way I always think about a Pillar or Hub pages, it's like you have the title for the book, which is Marketing for Plastic Surgeons, and then you've got the individual chapters, and within each chapter, you're creating articles that support the topic for that chapter. So it could be content marketing for plastic surgeons. Email marketing for plastic surgeons. And the articles are blog posts, and then you're interlinking those blog posts with that main pillar page. Is that the main concept?

Frank Olivo
Yes, that's exactly how it is. And they both should be linking to one another. They should all be linking internally. Like if you have this main Marketing for Plastic Surgeons and then you have a keywords for Plastic Surgeons article, the main article should be linking to the keywords article and vice versa. And then if we have a PPC for plastic surgeons, the keywords article should be linking to the PPC and vice versa. And both of them going back to the main page, both for users and also for Google to understand that your website just has a lot of rich content around this topic. They know that if somebody Googles marketing for plastic surgeons that they may be interested in all these other resources and they would prefer to send them to a page that's linked to other pages and linked from other pages that talk about this topic. Because there's just a lot more great stuff that they may be able to get on this website versus the one that just has this one article about marketing plastic surgeons.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So the thing that I love about Pillar and Hub pages is as you create your content, your calendar, what you're going to write or talk about, if you do it with the end goal in mind that you're going to create a Hub page, it can guide all the content that you're going to create. And rather than having all these random, random topics on your blog, which, okay, that may be okay, why would you not want to take when you're taking the time to create all this content at the end, be able to go, okay, we've got all the parts we need to create our Pillar page. Now we can create this Pillar page, and now all of a sudden, you've got this whole other asset that you can promote and is going to help, as you talked about, it's going to help your SEO. But so many people don't do that, and I'm not quite sure why.

Frank Olivo
I think that it can be a hard concept for a lot of people to wrap their heads around. I mean, we do this for a living and it ends up seeming just completely obvious. But in other domains, there are probably things that we make very illogical decisions about where our financial advisors are like, why would you do that?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Exactly. Well, I love it. Frank, you've dropped some serious value today. I really appreciate it. Any last minute thoughts, words of wisdom you want to leave us with today?

Frank Olivo
I think that really just this is one area where a professional services business could do very well. I think that a lot of it comes back to what someone's strengths are. If someone is very strong on video, they should be probably focusing on the video aspect, shooting that video, getting it onto YouTube, getting a transcript that goes onto the website, chopping it up in the sound bites that can go out on Instagram and TikTok and YouTube shorts and wherever. If we have something that's really a strong writer, they should probably try to focus on the written word. So ultimately, don't try to make a square peg fit and a round hole, you know, whatever you're good at and you're gonna be able to do better than anybody. Focus there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That is a that's a fantastic piece of advice. If you try to do something that doesn't resonate with you, you're not going to do a good job with it long term. So I love that. Where can people learn more about you?

Frank Olivo
If you're interested in checking out the website, you can find us at Sagapixel.com. Also, I love to hear from people on LinkedIn, so if you look me up, Franco Levo, I think there may be some link to my LinkedIn in the show notes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, we'll make sure that's in the show notes. If you're watching the video, you can see that scrolling at the bottom of the screen. So if you like what Frank had to say, he obviously knows what the hell he's talking about. Go connect with him and see how he might be able to help you. If this is something that you're looking at. Frank, thank you so much for taking the time. I really appreciate it. For those of you that are watching listening, I appreciate you as well. What we talked about today with Content Marketing all has to do with lead gen. And lead gen is one of the nine common revenue roadblocks we help people remove so they can accelerate growth. Which roadblocks are slowing down your growth? If you want to find out, you can head on over to Revenueroadblockscorecard.com. At revenueroadblockscorecard.com, you'll be able to get a free report that will help you discover and assess that. You can also always connect with us over at RialtoMarketing.com. Thanks so much. Till next time. Take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

Do you know you have an opportunity for revenue growth and are unsure how to make it happen? Do you lack someone with the time, skill set, and desire to take ownership of marketing to drive results?

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