How To Be An Impactful Communicator Part 2

How To Be An Impactful Communicator Part 2

How would your life change if you were a better communicator? For many of us, myself included, I think it could be significantly better. That’s why I have Leeza Steindorf from Core Success with me for part 2 on How To Be An Impactful Communicator. You don’t want to miss this.

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How To Be An Impactful Communicator Part 2



Tim Fitzpatrick
We are digging into communication once again. Today, I am super excited to have Leeza Steindorf from Core Success back with me for Part 2 of How to be an Impactful Communicator. Hi, I'm Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. Leeza, welcome, welcome back. And thanks for taking the time again.

Leeza Steindorf
Oh, it's my pleasure. Good to see you, Tim.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. So today we're jumping into part two. I want to give people just a quick recap of what we talked about in part one. If you missed that, go back, listen, watch it. Last time we talked about why so many conversations go south. What goes wrong from the get-go. We talked about the four steps of impactful communication. And we also talked about the importance of understanding ourselves in the communication process. Today, we're going to dig into some examples to help really solidify these four steps for people, for me too, I am certainly no expert, and you're going to help me with that. Before we go into some examples. Can you just highlight the four steps one more time?

Leeza Steindorf
Sure. So the one and two are kind of interchangeable. I think it's according to style and desire. But the first one that's usually useful to start with is the facts. So you are going to state facts that could be commonly agreed upon. The light is on or it is off. You're wearing glasses. My shirt is white. Things that our senses that we've agreed upon, our measurements can confirm. And that then takes us off of any rocky road of disagreement or different interpretations, although that often can also be a challenge. So we try and stick with the facts of what is. The second step is how I feel about that. My experience of you wearing glasses or that the light is on or my shirt is white. Like, what is my experience? What are my feelings, my perception of that? And then the third step is why that's important to me. I feel excited. You are wearing glasses, Tim, and I'm excited. I feel excited about that because vision is important to me and general health is important to me. And I remember you used to squint a little bit. And so now to see you wear glasses, I'm excited about that because I care. And I really like you to tell me, where did you get them from? I need a new pair. So the fourth step would be a request. Something clear. Now, that's a very basic formula that I just did. But even there, it's a great way to practice in really super simple daily circumstances those four steps. And I want to just add, the request is not a demand. It's literally a request, which means that you have a wish you're expressing and the other person does not have to do it. It's really an open invitation because they will feel whether it's open or not.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Okay. Thank you for that. So we got a couple of examples we're going to run through. The first one is very relevant for what we're dealing with with the pandemic. The topic of being vaccinated, not vaccinated. And how do you bring that up, right? It's like people sometimes, depending on how you feel about it, you want to know whether somebody's vaccinated or not. Can we run through these four steps? So if we just say, "Hey, my relatives want to come visit and I don't know whether they're vaccinated or not. And I want to have that conversation." How will this flow with these four steps?

Leeza Steindorf
Who are we talking to? Aunt Susie or?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Sure. Sure. Aunt Susie. Yeah, that'd be fine.

Leeza Steindorf
So starting out and just saying as Aunt Susie we're all dealing with the circumstances of this pandemic, from the quarantine to wearing masks in public venues and to the requests now from the government and individuals that people be vaccinated to help raise immunity. And you have a trip planned to come and visit us. And I feel uncomfortable even asking you about whether you've been vaccinated because I want to respect your privacy, and I don't want to be pushy in trying to find out what's going on in your personal and private life. And I also want to make sure that the health of my family is covered in myself. So I'd like to ask you first before you even share it with me. How do you feel? Would you share with me how you feel about conversing about the vaccine? So instead of just jumping into, are you vaccinated or not just opening up the conversation because my experience has been not only with clients but with just people in general, even having the conversation about it is very loaded. So if you have the opportunity and especially family situation or somebody's coming to stay in your private area, just have the conversation around the conversation. As complicated as that sound, diffuses the actual conversation, and then you can lead into the next step of asking or not asking or how you want to move forward with specifics.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So the first part you were talking, you were just talking about some of the general facts as you see them, but hopefully as most people would see them and how that makes you feel. And then you turned it back to her asking about how she felt. And I'm assuming giving her that opportunity also gives her the opportunity to if there's some dispute of the facts that you put out there touch on those as well.

Leeza Steindorf
Very well said. And I want to say, I really loved Tim, that you consistently capture essence of the conversation. No, you do. You have a really wonderful skill of capturing the essence of it and then verbalizing it so clearly it's really a gift. I appreciate that. So in this conversation, I did. I framed the general facts so those are facts that we can all more or less say, yes. We had quarantine. We are being requested to vaccinate. We are being required in certain States anyway to wear a mask and a public venue. So those are facts that more or less everybody can say, "Yep. That's what we're dealing with." And then I went into saying, I feel uncomfortable even asking you this. I'm talking about my experience around these common facts. I feel uncomfortable even having to ask you aunt Susie, my beloved relative. That's a personal question. Right. And then I go into, why do I feel uncomfortable? That's where some people get losses in that third step of what is it I'm explaining? I'm explaining my feeling. Why do I feel uncomfortable? Because I respect you and I respect your privacy and I respect your personal health sovereignty.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right?

Leeza Steindorf
Really, none of my business. And here we are. So I feel uncomfortable because I respect you and I love you. And I'd like to ask you into a conversation. How do you feel about even having this talk about the vaccines? So the fourth one, the whole scenario is really an invitation, Tim. Right. And the fourth step, the request is really culminating the invitation. Would you share with me how you feel about talking about the vaccines and your visit?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. So that's the request portion of it to just continue the conversation? Okay.

Leeza Steindorf
Correct.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. And then what would you like? Let's say an aunt Susie says, you know, I don't know, one of a few things is going to happen, right? She's going to appreciate the fact that you opened up. She's going to go. "Oh, yeah. Well, Lisa, I got vaccinated months ago." You know, and then you can continue that conversation or she's going to go, "Well, gosh. I really don't feel comfortable having that conversation." Because like you said, "It's personal health matter. I don't want to get into it." If she said that, how do you then continue going down that road?

Leeza Steindorf
So she says she doesn't want to share the information?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Leeza Steindorf
Okay. And clearly. So the invitation was to have a conversation about it, not have her tell me about the vaccine. You're taking the Avenue. Okay. She's not going to have that conversation. Just going to say, "I don't want to tell you yes or no." Alright. That becomes your fact.

Leeza Steindorf
Okay.

Leeza Steindorf
So I hear you not wanting to share your private information, and I respect that. And now I feel confused as to what to do because my mother has a heart condition and I know you want to come and see her. And now, if I don't know where you're at or even if you're not vaccinated, how are we going to deal with your visit? So now I'm in a confused situation and because you are important to me and I want this visit to go well, I don't know what to do. So I'm asking you to tell me, what are your thoughts around this? How can we solve this?

Tim Fitzpatrick
You're continually using the four steps. You just keep cycling over and over again.

Leeza Steindorf
And that's buildable as a skill, if you will, is to recognize which is the fact that you're going to start with. Right. So her not wanting to share about her vaccination now, I do have a feeling about that. Or I have a feeling about this whole conversation. I might take it down another road. You know what? I'm so frustrated that we're even having this conversation. I'm so tired of this whole thing because I want us all to just be able to see each other. I want to hug you without even having to think about it. I'd love to hear how you feel about that. Let's just not even talk about the vaccine. I just want to hear how you're feeling today, aunt Susie.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Leeza Steindorf
Right. So when I get to that request piece, I can really decide when I cycle back through again, as you're saying it. What fact am I going to start with again?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Okay. I got it. This is why it's so important to really understand each of these steps, because in a conversation, you've got to have the ability to think quickly and go, "Okay, here's the facts. And let's keep going through this so that we hopefully get somewhere with this conversation."

Leeza Steindorf
Yes. And I want to encourage you and I can understand Tim, especially when this is being presented for the first time. Or it's rather new, even if you've heard this process before in various packages, if you will. It's really about what I call self studentship when you know yourself, when you know how you feel, when you're in a conversation with yourself, in a backdrop way, whatever you're conversing with out front, those steps come very easily. Right. Like, if you wanted to, I could break down the four steps in you being able to reiterate so clearly what we're talking about, because I'm aware of my experience in our conversation. So when you're talking to aunt Susie or when you're on the street talking to the mailman or where you're in your office talking to your colleague, when you're aware of your experience, when you have that heightened or just clear awareness, you're not occupied with mental chatter, but it's just like, "Oh, this is happening. That took place. This is how I feel. This is important for me." It just becomes kind of the dance you're always so that it, you're always ready on the ready if you will. And it keeps you in the present moment. Mindfulness is the catchword of our day. This is mindfulness. It's responsive mindfulness, because you are so present with what's going on that you can respond from a place of ease within yourself because you're very aware of what's happening.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. The more seems to me, the more you use these steps in this framework, the more it just starts to become second nature. You're not thinking about it as much as I probably am now. For you, it's just it is.

Leeza Steindorf
That's right. And when it goes south, as we have spoken about, right. When it gets testy, when somebody my first reaction now, when somebody is aggressive or upset, is that structure is right there for me, the first thing I do is I go to the facts and I state them. It's like a neutralizer, right. And what most people do and why most conversations go south is the first thing they do is they accuse either themselves or the other. It's not my fault. Or if you had only, right. Instead of okay, the bill wasn't paid. Neutral ground. The bill was not paid. Now we can look into how do I feel about the bill not being paid? And why do I feel concerned that the bill wasn't paid? Because I now have to delay other bills because I didn't receive the revenue.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Leeza Steindorf
And I'm just asking you, can you tell me why it wasn't paid? No accusation. Right. So now we're in a very different conversation than, "I told you ten times to pay that bill and you still haven't paid it. Now we have all these back low." Right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Leeza Steindorf
Very different scenario.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So let's talk about something that comes up for coaches, consultants, professional service people on a fairly regular basis where we can't please everybody. We run into a client that's just they're unhappy, right? They're making demands on our time that aren't part of the scope or aren't realistic. How do we work through that?

Leeza Steindorf
Well, give me an example.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Let's just take one. Yeah. Let's put you in my shoes. Hypothet go example on a marketing coach and consultant, and we're working on a website project for a client. And, you know, I'm the client and I come to you, and I'm not happy I'm upset because you're not responding to me quickly enough. I send you questions and you respond to me within 24 hours. I expect you to respond to me in 2 hours. Let's say.

Leeza Steindorf
Okay, Tim, I'm hearing you're real frustrated that you sent me an email yesterday morning at nine. And here we are today at 03:00 p.m.. And you've not heard from me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. And you know it's when you don't respond quickly enough, it's delaying the project, and we really need to get this done.

Leeza Steindorf
And I feel badly. I'm pedaling on all pedals that I can here to get things done for you and how you feel about our relationship and meeting your expectations is important to me. So I feel frustrated with myself that I got so much work going on here that I couldn't respond to you quickly enough. And in the promised 24 hours. And on the other hand, I'm attending to matters that really are important to your work. Right. So I'm asking you what would work for you or what would have worked for you in this situation that you wouldn't feel as frustrated as you are right now?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Gosh. That's a good question. I just want to know that the project is continuing to move forward and we're not hitting speed bumps.

Leeza Steindorf
Okay. So what I'm hearing you say is just to have heard any word so that you feel calmer would have been useful because you want this to go without any speed bumps. And so would it be useful then for me to have just shot you one email in process we'll get back to you by Thursday morning?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Leeza Steindorf
Okay. Alright. I'm glad to do that for you. I will not have time to give you a full report in that. But I will absolutely commit to letting you know whether we're on target or not, just so that you hear something from the void.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So what would you do if in this case, so, for example, let's just say we had kind of assumed that we would respond within a certain period of time. Right. Let's say we did say that we would respond within 24 hours. Right. And we did respond within 24 hours. But the client is expecting a quicker response. Right. They are changing the expectations even though the expectations were set up front.

Leeza Steindorf
Alright. So now we're going into something we're going to talk about in the third part, but I'm going to it now here because it is important. And that is when somebody is coming to you. For me, the trigger, the stimulus is when I notice somebody is upset, I do not start with my own experience. I start with theirs because if they're upset, what happens is when we get triggered. When we're upset, when we get emotional, that's stronger, let's say. We go into our reptilian brain, our base brain. So usually when we're talking, we're sitting here talking, we're in our frontal lobe. This is the last part of our evolution has been up frontier. Right. And that's important because when we feel threatened or frustrated, we go to fight or flight, which is a a primitive response. And when we go to fight, flight or freeze, all of our blood goes to our limbs and our life like we're ready to do something and we are no longer able to use our cognitive abilities as well. And there are many gazillion examples of that happening, and you can see it in your own life. So when somebody comes and they're frustrated and I'm going to talk to them from a cognitive place, they can't hear it because they're ready for something. Right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Leeza Steindorf
And you know, this experience like you're all calm and you're talking and the other person just like this, you're having a conversation that's going to go like that. So by speaking their situation for them, if you will or what you estimate their situation to be, you bring that conversation to a level where both people can actually speak at a cognitive level. So what I would say in the situation and maybe he's not screaming at you but still. And by the way, I would not have this conversation in writing when I do this is communication training. This is really important. Written communication is always interpreted according to the readers' emotional and mental state. Does not matter what the writer intends.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yep.

Leeza Steindorf
Whatever that reader is feeling, that's how it's going to be interpreted, which is why so many things in writing go south. So if you're going to have a conversation like this, pick up the phone first suggestion. So the customer comes and says, you know, I wanted this and I wrote to you and whatever is you can say. So I hear you're really frustrated because you wrote this email yesterday morning at 09:00. And here it is today at 03:00 p.m.. And we've not gotten back to you in the 48 hours time frame that we had all agreed upon.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right.

Leeza Steindorf
And I hear you frustrated because you're concerned, right? Is the feeling now you're concerned about your website.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Leeza Steindorf
Now we're going into number three because it's important to you. Your business is dependent on this and your income is dependent on this and you just want to get it done. So you can check that off your list. And so I'd like to know in this point. So now I've gone through his three steps or her three steps. What would have helped you to have heard immediately? You can give them options like to her immediately for me to pick up the phone, that you could have reached me by phone? What would have helped you that you're not going to be consistently concerned and you will know that we are working on your project? Right. So you've done a number of things there. You've not only gone through the four steps, but you have put it back on to them instead of you defending while I was busy and we have the 48 hours agreement or 24, whatever it is you have and you're changing the expectations. You're putting it back on them. I hear you. I wanted to work for you. I know why this is important for you. It's important to me too. So what's going to help you? Well, I need you to respond immediately. Okay. Given that you're one of 24 clients that I'm working with, it's not super possible. What else could we do? Right. Can we have every other day check-in that would help you. And then now you're in conversation of problem-solving. But they've been heard and that's going to bring them out of the back rain in the front. It's like, okay, he got me. He does care. Alright, now I can breathe. Now let's talk about how can I get my answer that I want pronto.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. You were setting the limit a bit there, letting them know, "Hey, this expectation you have isn't something we can meet. But what else could we do that would help make you feel better about this situation?"

Leeza Steindorf
Absolutely. The tools that we're talking about Tim are universal. If you think if you have children or anybody that's listening has kids, if a child comes and says, "I want this done." You don't say "Oh, yes, of course. Here you go."

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right.

Leeza Steindorf
You want to hear why they're asking for cheesecake before dinner? Like, I get it. It looks great and it's warm out of the oven. And you love to have some. But guess what? Your body needs nutrition so you could run and play. So we're going to first give your body that. And as soon as you have this bowl of broccoli, you can have a piece of cheesecake. Right? So you're not just giving away the farm. So I need you to answer immediately. Okay. I have my limitations, but I want to make it work for you. So tell me what would work for you. And now you're in conversation. As I said, this whole thing is an invitation to be in connection, really.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So this leads into a question that I think a lot of people may have. What if this other person doesn't want to see things differently? They just keep hammering. "Well, no, you need to respond to me within 2 hours. I don't care if you can't do that. You need to." Like, what do we do?

Leeza Steindorf
So I'm hearing you say that you've heard me, Tim, that I can't respond in 2 hours. And I've heard you say that you don't care. You still want me to respond within 2 hours. And I wish I could do that. I really would. But I recognize I'm not able to do that. And because I want our relationship to work, I'm asking you, what else can we do? Because a two hour requirement or expectations you have is simply not feasible with my workload.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Leeza Steindorf
And you just keep recycling that. My experience is honestly and see, and this is kind of the backdrop of the whole thing Tim. Absolutely. It's not even a belief. It's a paradigm that humans are good. Trees are good. Rivers good. Mountains are good, like, there's goodness and everything. And so when I'm talking to somebody, if they're that adamant about 2 hours, it's not about the 2 hours they set. They're either afraid that you're gonna forget them. They're afraid they're not going to get it done, and they're going to lose their business and not be able to put food on the table. There's something going on for those people. And so you want to hear the 2 hours. You're clear you can't. My experience is when you really want to understand someone and you express care for them. And if you can find that in yourself and express care, somehow they're going to want to converse with you. And if they don't, which is probably going to be another question if they don't really don't want to see it differently or they don't want to continue down the road, then you get to decide to not be in relationship with them. A family member. Aunt Susie, I love you. I so want to see you. And because of my mother's compromised health right now, I need to have the conversation of how we can look at the circumstances so you can come and visit and still keep my mom safe. Won't even converse with me about that. If we can't even have that conversation, I literally my hands are tied. I'm going to ask you to not come visit at this point in time. In the future, yes, but until this whole thing gets clarified, I can't do that. So I'm not making her change. I'm dealing with the parameters she now has given me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I want to pull something out here that you said, which is we were talking about the 2 hours. Typically, the 2 hours is what we see at the surface. There's something below the surface that is driving that demand. And if we can get to the heart of that, it may make it easier for us to then communicate what we can do. That's really going to meet that because it's really not the 2 hours.

Leeza Steindorf
That's right. That's exactly right. So you just did it again Tim. You pulled out the coronel of the truth. That's why being able to speak their situation. And you're guessing right. You don't know for sure to be able to say so. Tim, I hear you being really adamant about the 2 hours, and I'm going to guess that you are super concerned about this website. There's a time crunch for you. I'd really like to understand what that's about. I can imagine. Maybe because the pandemic, your revenue is really tight or you've been screwed by other web designers like something's going on here and I'd like to work with you. I can't do the 2 hours, but could we talk about it? I'd like to really invite you to share with me. What's up with this? The pressure so I can help alleviate it in our working relationship.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. My guess is when you can do that a lot of times you can get to a resolution of some way, shape or form.

Leeza Steindorf
Absolutely. And what I just did was the four steps. In that just little blurb. And you can see how I'm hearing your concern. And I'm speaking to it. I'm taking guesses even if I'm off, even if it's something totally different. You know, my rent on the building is due and I can't pay whatever the reason may be, even if you're not hitting it, the fact that you're trying and you care is often not always, some people say, "You don't know what you're talking about. Don't try and understand my feelings. You have no clue about me." It happened when you say, "You're right. I don't. And I would like to. I'd really like to understand because this relationship is important, and I'd like to be able to deliver in a way that works for both of us."

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So what do we do if there's no resolution? Like, there's no way to agree. You kind of touched on that a little bit with the aunt Susie example, it seems like, well, if we can't get to a resolution, then we just need to set some type of limit.

Leeza Steindorf
Right. And so that's where especially as a business owner, you do get to decide, right. These are boundaries and boundaries are healthy.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right.

Leeza Steindorf
So you can say, "Look, Tim. I really want to understand you. I hear you've got the two-hour request or expectations that I simply can't meet. I want to keep your business. I want to do a good job for you. But if that's your requirement and I can't meet it, then I'm going to ask if perhaps you want to find another designer who can meet your needs for you, and then I will release you from this contract because I do want you to be satisfied." And that's okay. That's understanding them in a different situation. Somebody's like harassing you or it's not working. You also get to say, "So, Tim, I really like to retain you as a client, and I respect myself. I want to be treated appropriately. And with the respect that I offer to you. And so I don't see this working this way. So I'm going to ask you to please find another web designer."

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. Have you ever seen a situation where the four steps don't work?

Leeza Steindorf
You have to define what don't work means.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. That's a good question, because we already talked about. So I guess when you say don't work, it could just be. Well, there's no resolution. Right. And we just talked about that, right. So there is sometimes there isn't going to be a resolution, and that's okay.

Leeza Steindorf
What I'd like to do is invite you and everyone else to understand the backdrop of what this is about. This is not about four, it's not a ladder that you're just going to go up or down with the four steps. At first blush, it may appear that way, but what this is about is connecting with another human being and inviting them to a conversation and inviting them to a connected conversation. So the four steps always work if you as the individual using them, if you will, are committed to connecting and inviting someone else to connect a conversation. Now, whether they respond that way or not, isn't the determinant of whether they worked or not. They work if you have really expressed yourself in a way that feels congruent to you, and I can tell you consistently if it sounds like all of my conversations always come out smelling like roses, that's not the case. Quite honestly, it's probably just the opposite, because what a lot of people do is they dance around so they never have these conversations. But then their relationships and also their business relationships remain very much on the surface. And I have people I can think of a large organization, the CEO who did business with me, actually, his coach not only did planning form, and I was his executive coach, and he struggled with this level of interaction. He just didn't. He didn't want it. He just wanted it to all be nice. Years later, he came back to me and he said, I know that you are the person that I can rely on to give me clear and direct answers. And I want to work with you again. So he got to a point where that kind of operating of just make it all nice and don't talk about the stuff in the end, really doesn't work. But it gives the appearance of everything being smooth, which it's not because underneath things are boiling. As we've seen in our culture, things have been boiling, and now they're erupting. So using these steps will work for you. If you use them for your own self studentship, they will keep you authentic and congruent and in integrity. It doesn't mean that all the conversation is going to be a walk in the park.

Tim Fitzpatrick
We need to go into this with our eyes open and clear good expectations. But you can apply the framework to any conversation if you're interested in having a connected conversation.

Leeza Steindorf
Absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So in that regard, they'll always work. It's not that they're not going to work.

Leeza Steindorf
If it's only working means for yourself as the applier and user practice.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So you can just keep using it over and over. I love it. I think this helps solidify things a bit for people to just kind of talk through and see how you apply these four steps. You just kept applying them over and over again. So there's plenty of examples in here of how we can do that. Now, next time in part three, we're going to dig into this a little bit more. You touched on it a bit today about how we need to understand other people's perspectives and positions to really make this work and come together. So we touched on that a bit today, but we're going to dig deeper, more examples there. Any last-minute things you want to leave us with today, Leeza?

Leeza Steindorf
I guess I would just touch back on what I shared earlier is believe in good. Just believe in good that people are doing their best. And even when they are screaming or angry, there's something inside of them that is so disrupted from the goodness that they are. And if you can just keep talking to that and addressing that as best as you can in daily conversations, I'm not talking about extreme circumstances, but in normal daily function, you keep just addressing that and addressing that and addressing that. You're going to get somewhere. And if you don't, then you know it's time to remove yourself from that situation, and that's also very clear.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. If you guys like what we're talking about, head on over to Leeza Steindorf dot com. Be happy to chat with you. She obviously knows what the heck she's talking about. This is two of three conversations. I'm looking forward to the next one. Leezaa, thank you again for being here and look forward to catching up here again in a few days to recap this whole thing and tie it up in a nice, neat little bow. So thank you for tuning in. Guys again. I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing if you want to gain clarity on where to focus your marketing efforts right now, hop on over to our website Rialto Marketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing dot com. Click on to get a free consult button. Be happy to chat with you and give you some clarity on what your next right steps need to be. Until next time. Take care.


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Copyright © 2021 Leezá Carlone Steindorf. All rights reserved. No duplication without written permission. Thank you.

Leezà Carlone Steindorf is a communication, crisis and culture transformation specialist. Her extensive background in multinational corporations, trade unions, nonprofits, and educational institutions in over 35+ cultures allows her to help individuals and organizations make sustainable forward movement, especially during the most extreme of circumstances. Reach out to Leezá@LeezaSteindorf.com.

About the Author Tim Fitzpatrick

Tim Fitzpatrick is the President of Rialto Marketing. At Rialto Marketing, we help service businesses simplify marketing so they can grow with less stress. We do this by creating and implementing a plan to communicate the right message to the right people. Marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the RIGHT plan.

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