How To Connect & Engage Your Audience With Podcasting

Are you podcasting to promote your business? If not, you are missing out! We've got Margo Lovett from Her Business Her Voice and The Podcast Academy Online with us today to chat about podcasting and how you can get started using podcasting to grow your business today.

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How To Connect & Engage Your Audience With Podcasting



Tim Fitzpatrick
Are you podcasting to promote your business? If not, I think you are missing out, and that is why I have invited a special guest with me today and we are gonna get into how to connect and engage your audience with podcasting.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. Thank you so much for tuning in. I am really, really excited to have with me Margo Lovett from the podcast Academy Online and the Her Business, Her Voice, Her Conversation podcast. Margo, welcome. Thanks for being here.

Margo Lovett
Hi, Tim. Glad to be here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So you have been on your podcast was probably a couple of months ago now. We had a great conversation, loved it. And so I am happy to have you on and get into podcasting today. I really enjoyed the conversation and I've been looking forward to this also selfishly. I've been looking forward to this because since this pandemic started, we have been doing these Facebook lives that we are turning into podcasts. We're repurposing that content. So I love talking about podcasting right now. I'm happy to have you here.

Margo Lovett
Thank you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So before we get into it, can you just tell us a little bit more about what you're doing with not only podcasts, Academy Online, but your podcast and how you're helping business people?

Margo Lovett
Well, you know what, this is a very peculiar time of a slice of history and what I do hope this is Her Voice, Her Conversation was built upon the fact that I came out of corporate wanting to have a bright light for women in particular to reinvent, become podcasters, authors and entrepreneurs. But since this has happened, we need to be a bright light for every business, everyone that not only is thinking about becoming an author, podcast or entrepreneur, but I pulled out.

Margo Lovett
I opened up the vault recently and the conversations that I've had with thought leaders, business leaders make these conversations known to everyone because so many businesses are struggling. Some people had the guts and gumption to start and then the pandemic hit and the questions they're wondering, oh, my God, what do we do now? So I thought to myself, you have access to some fabulous conversations. Open them up, bring them back as you do, repurpose what's in your hand and make these things available.

Margo Lovett
Transcribe these conversations, let people study so that they can apply. And I'm real passionate about that because people such as yourself have come on to the show given just truth and total information. And now people don't have to necessarily close their doors if they just make a phone call, if they listen to a podcast and they find that missing piece that helps them move one more day, one more inch, make one more call. And I'm passionate about that. Because we don't have to suffer and wonder and go underwater necessarily without somebody, knows what we have, what we need to make sure that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
The resources we need are out there. We just need to know where to find them.

Margo Lovett
True.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So that's awesome. What about the podcast Academy Online? What are you doing with that?

Margo Lovett
That is my love, because I'm like you. I love podcasting. I understand that it is an excellent marketing tool. It is something that a lot of people are beginning to understand the purpose for business and for pleasure and for us lifelong learners. So I love podcasting to the place where I started podcast Academy Online.

Margo Lovett
It is for the entrepreneur, it is for the adults because as adults, life gets in the way. Now people are having to homeschool. They want to podcast and build their podcast, but their plate is so full. So the academy was built to accommodate the lifestyle of people that have that much of the passion, but they can't just methodically stay on that path. They have the ebb and flow of learning, but they still can come into a community and stay focused and learn how to create, build, and launch their podcast and be successful. So that's what I'm loving these days.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. Well, thank you for sharing that. I love that. So let's get into this and talk about podcasting now. So I think it's important to start this conversation by helping people understand. I mean, why do you even want to podcast? What are the benefits of podcasting for your business?

Margo Lovett
Well, you know, there's an interesting statistic out there. Podcast is growing by leaps and bounds, not only here in the States, but globally. There are some countries that are much more ahead of us as far as listenership goes. But as the states go, we are moving along. With that said, we are understanding that podcasting opens up a whole new thought process. It introduces you to people that you never would have met, your concepts and possibilities that are available to you.

Margo Lovett
You just have to connect to them. And as a lifelong learner, somebody is always introducing something different, cutting edge. And as a person and as an entrepreneur, I always say, and I know that you agree, podcasting is an excellent marketing tool, something that you can use over and over and over again, whereas terrestrial radio and God knows I am not knocking terrestrial radio, but you do something on terrestrial radio one time. And what is its lifespan with a podcast?

Margo Lovett
It's evergreen. It's always going to be there. That's why I can pull these conversations out of the vault and know that they're relevant for the person. They're starting a business, the person that is just waiting for that piece of information to that's keeping them up at night. So many, many benefits to podcasting.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, it's definitely from a marketing perspective, it's for businesses that are coaches, consultants, professional services experts that are basically selling their knowledge and their expertise.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Podcasting is a great way to put content out there. To get in front of your target audience, build credibility, get people to know they can trust you. I also think podcasting is I mean, it's a fairly easy way to produce content. Yes, it does take a little bit of time, but there's a lot of people that don't like writing. They don't like blogging. Podcasting is I mean, it's easy to just jump on and have conversations with people or you jump on and you just talk.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So it's it can be quick. It's easy if you're doing what we're doing. Right. We're doing a Facebook live and then we're going to repurpose that. You can if you do video along with your podcast, you can get a ton of mileage out of that content. So it's a great way to produce content, get in front of your audience, build that know like trust so that they're ready to then take that next step with your business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And like you said, if the content is evergreen, once you put it out there, it's there for eternity until you pull it down. Right. But as long as you're in business, you're going to leave it there and you're in good shape.

Margo Lovett
Can I just add one word?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Absolutely. Please do.

Margo Lovett
You know, podcasts allow you to form relationships with people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Margo Lovett
And that is. Oh, my God. That is the new currency, especially when it's heartfelt and it's genuine.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Margo Lovett
So you and I both know that we got together and did a fabulous podcast. Little did I know because of my relationship that I formed with a magazine editor. She calls me up one day and asked me to write a piece on Black Lives Matter because she's doing this special article for her August edition. And then she asked me, what are your three favorite podcast episodes that you recently put out? And I just told her yours was one of them and two others.

Margo Lovett
I had no idea that she was going to feature three of those episodes in her special edition magazine. She had a full-blown picture of you, article and didn't have to pay a dime. I paid not one dime. And the mileage that gave me, it was a position you and the other two ladies, not that you need positioning, but everybody wants position.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Absolutely.

Margo Lovett
And the readership is off the chain for that magazine because that's her baby. That's her love. She's building all that every day. And so it builds relationships. It gives crazy, mad exposure and as I say, digital, that magazine is digital and it's hard copy.

Margo Lovett
So God knows where that's going to end up. That's not the first time that's happened. I've had interviews with people and they use that interview and it's landed them on magazine covers. They used it to pitch themselves and it's landed them on magazine covers. So there's a business part of it. There's a lifelong learning benefit. And then there's that glamorous thing. A man I kind to know who you are. I love it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. And that's a really good point about the relationship-building side of it, because, I mean, there are some business owners that have just got into podcast just to build relationships with potential referral partners, with potential clients. Right. They're inviting ideal clients onto their podcast, interviewing them. And it is a very laid back, non-sales type conversation where you just build this relationship and you just never know where those are going to go. So there's so many benefits to podcasting.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You've touched on some really, really key ones. So thank you for doing that. Now, these next questions we're going to get into are more strategic based, which I love. I think that is our approach from a marketing perspective. You have to get the fundamentals down. You have to have a strategy in place before you start getting tactical. So I want to share this quote from Sun Tzu, which I hope I'm not botching the name there, but I love this quote.

Tim Fitzpatrick
He said, "Strategy before tactics is the slowest route to victory." Right? So you can win with strategy and know tactics, but tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat. You cannot win if you are just focusing on tactics. So keep this in mind as we go into these next several questions because that is what we're focusing on. That's really the strategy behind why you're doing this podcasting. So this first question here is, so you want to be a podcast or what? What is your why? What are your expectations of it? So let's dig into that.

Margo Lovett
Your why is the guts of everything, when I learned how to podcast, they taught me how to. He taught me how to podcast from the inside out so that it's organic. And so that means getting in tune with who you are so that you can tap into your authenticity. You can be honest enough why you're podcasting, because some people think that it's for the glamour.

Margo Lovett
It's for me. It's because I'm going to jump in this thing and make a ton of money. It's because I'm going to manipulate different situations. If that's so, you have to be honest and take that as your why, because that's what you always build upon and you get into a place where that's your why is the reason why certain people will be a guest on your show. It is the reason why you chose a certain title for your show.

Margo Lovett
The description, even how you write the description for your podcast comes from your why. So you really can't do anything until you establish that. Be it right. Be it wrong. Establish it, be true to yourself concerning your why.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So let me ask you a question here. So like I've heard people talk about your big why in life, your mission in life. Right. So for me, that's having a positive, lasting impact on the lives that I touch. Is that what we're talking about here? It's kind of the larger purpose of what you're doing.

Margo Lovett
The larger purpose and passion have to be there because that's where you're going to draw your energy and the synergy that goes out with your guest, with your audience. So that's packaged in. That's all a part of the brand. So you have to understand that it gets back to the meeting, that man in the mirror putting your life work together, putting that together so that you'll always be true to that why, that life work when you leave that mic and somebody catches you out at the grocery store and you say, oh, my God, I listened to the last episode, it was so good.

Margo Lovett
Are you going to be that same person behind that why? Because that is so strong. And I'm telling you what, it's something that I know I was at a huge event to this day. I don't know the woman's name, but she comes running up to me and she tells me, I love the energy. I love how positive your shows are. And all I could do was thank her. And I was so glad that I am authentic that I met her with the same energy and synergy as she was satisfied.

Margo Lovett
It wasn't like she looked at me like, who is this person, man? You're not Margo Lovett. So that why is so important. And when you're building out your podcast, I always tell the students this is the unglamorous part, but it is the necessary part. You have to figure this out.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. What about expectations?

Margo Lovett
Be true to yourself once again, what are your expectations now? Are you expecting to have two million downloads and streams that very first year? Look at what your subject matter is. What you want to present to the world? Are there enough people interested in that to accommodate what you want to be all about? We have to be realistic about our expectations. And to me, when you start out organic, you have your vision and you've written it down, but you're methodically building up on that living room to tweak along the way to, as you say, 90 days out.

Margo Lovett
Let's take another look at this is what we're doing working. Let's staying true to your why. Then you can map out once again and meet what your expectations are. That's very important, because if you have pie in the sky dreams and if you can't meet them by a certain milestone, then people get discouraged. They feel as though they're ready to throw in the towel when you just stop. Right. There's a picture of a guy with a little hand pick and he's picked a way in this cave.

Margo Lovett
And right on the other side is this wall of diamonds. Now, you may be one hand pick away from getting to your diamonds, but you falter because you fell below your expectations and didn't meet a milestone.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I think that's really a really important point is I think it's great to have lofty goals and don't let anybody tell you that you can't do it. I think on the flip side, it is important to have realistic expectations. I've listened to so many podcasts where they have said, man, if I was consumed with my podcast numbers the first year, year and a half, two years I was doing this, I would quit because they sucked. They were awful.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Nobody was listening to it. But I was consistent. I just kept doing it over and over and over again. And you never know when you're going to start hitting that point of critical mass. So you've got to be consistent and just do it. That's the why is so important there. If you have a strong enough why when you're going through this build-up phase, that's what's going to keep driving you when every time you're doing this, you're like, gosh, how many people are actually going to listen to this?

Margo Lovett
I also want to add I have a why and teaching students have your why. But when sometimes your why can get a bit exhausted, so make sure that you have a backup to your why, you have this double layer and we can talk about that later on because it comes from support and mentorship.

Margo Lovett
And you have a why because of your passion and your goals. But then on that backup why is, holy cow, I just spent fifteen thousand dollars on learning how to do this. That's the backup to my why. Aw man, I've been in this two or three years. I can't quit. That's the backup to my why. So that's important also to have in place to keep it before you so that you're always reminded of your why and your backup why.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. So I want to podcast this next question is, are you willing to challenge the way you show up so your audience can identify with you?

Margo Lovett
Important, that's important because we go through the paces of identifying our ideal listener and the ideal listeners always you're all who you are is always bound up with that ideal listener. My strategist told me what you are the epitome of your listener. So if you springboard, always take it back to you. In the early days when you were a deer in the headlights coming out of corporate and couldn't find the information that you needed so that you could move forward.

Margo Lovett
I found that I had to make sure that I had to step up to the challenge. And I still do the challenge of staying authentic. The person behind the mic is who I am. That's who I present to the guests. And when you step up to that challenge, then your confidence falls into place. And when the guests come onto your show, there is no rivalry, no one-upmanship. That is a safe space. That is your guest space.

Margo Lovett
So how you show up and challenge yourself to sit behind this mic is so very important. And I think it's a place that you grow into. But you take what you grow into it as you become, as you check back in with your wife, as you learn to podcast from the inside out. And that's always looking at the man in the mirror and putting him up next to who I must be for my audience. Rather than somebody I created for my audience. I must be this person for my audience because I am that person.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Yeah. You can't try to be somebody that you're not. Right. If you do, at some point, it's going to come through. So I think it's really important to kind of pull out that point you just made about the more you do this, the better you're going to get. Yes, I would say I get better every time I do these things. I'm getting more and more comfortable doing them early on, no matter how excited I tried to be.

Tim Fitzpatrick
There's always that that fear, that hesitancy kind of in the beginning where you really you are finding your voice. Right. And the more you do it, the more comfortable you get and the more you start to find your true voice, I think.

Margo Lovett
Yes, as long as you stay with your why. Do not, I mean, I tell everybody Oprah has her style. Joe Rogan has his style. Right. Patrick has his style. Run your show the way you're supposed to run it. If you stay true to your why, to yourself, then all of that confidence, all of that's going to fall into place. And don't wait until it's perfectly in place. As you said, just be consistent. Keep doing it. Keep the fire alive in your in your spirit so that your if I if the a bunch of you get to tied and a dead silence comes, who cares. OK, well yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah we're all human. I would say two if you, if you are an active podcast listener, some of the popular podcast you listen to, go back and listen to the first 10 episodes, you will be shocked. You're like, oh my God, this is not good, you know? I mean, none of us are good in the beginning. We have to get good by practicing. And so it's that if you have fear or hesitancy, go back and listen to some people's first episodes and you will start to get comfortable and go, oh, gosh, they started there, too.

Margo Lovett
It's very, very true. Just get started. That's the thing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's it. One of my mentors always talked about taking the next measurable step. You get bogged down with all the things you have to do. No, forget that. What's the next measurable step you need to take and take it. So now we're going to get into your story, right. I love this because we love storytelling from a marketing perspective. Are you willing to tell your story? And really, why is it important to tell your story?

Margo Lovett
Your story is your podcast, everybody. There are fifty billion realtors. Fifty billion marketers. Fifty billion boomers looking for that next debt change. The defining moment comes when you tell your story, I mean, as transparent as possible.

Margo Lovett
And I always tell people I was sixty one years old when I decided that I was going to create her business, Her Voice, Her Conversation. Go all in. This is no longer a hobby. Get the best strategist and mentor I could get and let's do this. That's part of my story. I'm not going to try to hide that. And now I just I know no, tell the story that I didn't retire from corporate.

Margo Lovett
I quit the job after twenty six years, took a year off, and decided that I have to come back to my love, to my passion, and I never look back. You have to tell your story because that's what makes you different. That's what will always stand out and set your show apart from everybody else's. And can I tell you one thing? There was we get back to relationships. When I was a part of work, passionate radio network, the head of the network called me up.

Margo Lovett
Ring, ring, ring. Margo, let's do an interview. And I'm just are you kidding me? Let's do it. Yeah. Raise the roof. I didn't know any such an excellent interview. I had no idea that he was setting up the scenario for me to tell a story that would but end up on in and be impactful for his own personal story. So I went on to tell him about how I quit corporate America had to take a year off to get my physical and mental health in order. And I gave him all the reasons why he already kind of knew.

Margo Lovett
But he gently led me to the fact that when I was 19 years old, I was a part of a domestic violence situation, had buried debt, covered debt, and gone on with my life. Here I am at age 60. It all comes flooding back from one phone call, one phone call that I get from a contractor at work. I couldn't believe it. It crumbled me. It crushed me. So I'm feeling comfortable, to tell the story, to say things that I've never even said in my book.

Margo Lovett
And do you know, when he released it on LinkedIn and I did the same, you know, it started trending. And every time that episode comes up, people are listening and emailing me. And I just have one other addition to that story. A year after it was released, I got an email from a woman who felt comfortable enough to call me and tell me about how she was raped while she was serving in the military.

Margo Lovett
That's the power of a story. That's the power. And that's undeniably what people need. And when you tell your story with authenticity and openness and you never walk back from it, make sure that it's your story not embellished. It's your story, your signature story. People are going to remember that. And I couldn't believe that that woman entrusted that information to me. And guess what she said in the podcast. She's just become on the podcast.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Again, I'm pulling this out. Your story makes you memorable and it makes you relatable, which I think is so, so important. You want people to remember you, but they need to relate to you as well. You know, it's so interesting. One of the I this was a while back, I was at a marketing conference and a guy by the name of Joey Coleman spoke there and he speaks about customer experience. Really smart dude.

Tim Fitzpatrick
But he started his presentation by, like, just slamming through all these different photos that were representative of his life. And he was telling his story as he's going through these photos. And it's kind of hard to do justice to this, but when he was done with it and this was like two minutes, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, and every story, every slide, he's talking about it. By the time he was done, I just remember this feeling of, Oh, my God, that was so cool, you know, I was like, I don't have a lot in common with this guy, but I feel like I know him a little bit better, you know, because of the way he told that story. And I took that. And I start all of my workshops and presentations with that. And I actually had somebody this week who said something to me. They're like, that is.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I remember that that was so cool the way you did that, and I was like, well, I appreciate that I did and I took it from somebody, you know, I model that. But that really shows your story is really, really important to just remember and make you memorable and it helps people relate to you.

Margo Lovett
And podcasts are not podcast are different from Netflix and television. And restoring your cars have a way of drawing you in anyway, because by the time a person subscribes or they see you, they run across your show here and there and they know what you're all about, then you have a way of bringing them in to that arena. And if you're consistently presenting this atmosphere, this energy, it's just memorable. Yeah, I love it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I like it. So, Margo, thank you for sharing that. You've shared some very some of the real strategic elements that we need to consider before jumping into podcasting. Let's say I'm convinced. I'm ready to go. What are some of the simple steps I need to take to get started, take that next measurable step?

Margo Lovett
It always goes back to make sure that you're clear about your why. Yeah, take a look at what you want your show to look like and what you don't want to look like. Get clear on that early on. And always bring people back to get your structure in place before you buy your might know what you're getting into. What are the steps of becoming a podcaster? Everybody wants to run out and get that role podcast and mic and you don't know what the heck to do with it. Another mic that you could use, they go out and get these mixers and stuff. But, you know, the hold up, you don't have to do that right away.

Margo Lovett
Make sure that you get the other things structure in place and then you can get your equipment. And I always tell people, don't do this alone, get yourself connected to a mastermind. Get yourself with a strategist the way I did. And I hear you speak of strategist, mentor. Don't try to podcast by yourself because you'll get into power fade, which is very real. And the dreaded don't get past episode number eight. You don't want to fall into that.

Margo Lovett
Podcasting is easy, but it takes time and it takes practice. And there are many reasons why a person can get discouraged along the way. So you don't want to set yourself up for failure. Get your pieces in place, your why what ou want your podcast to look like what you don't want it to look like. Get your structure in place, get yourself a mentor. And when you get yourself a mentor, get with a mastermind, somebody who's doing what you want to do.

Margo Lovett
They're doing it. You have done it. Then everything will fall into place. Then you can get that good shining mic in that room. And you know, and you'll feel good and you'll feel valuable and necessary because you are your voice will be ready to go out and see should something come up. You'll have somebody something to fall back upon to say keep going, keep going don't over-edit anything. Keep going. You got this. You can do this.

Tim Fitzpatrick
We don't need to overcomplicate this, especially in the beginning, once you've got that, you're why these strategic elements that you've talked about from there. I think the next decision for most podcasters is what type of show am I going to have? Right. Am I going to interview people? Is it just going to be me flying solo? Am I going to do kind of a group round robin type discussion? Those are the most common types of shows.

Margo Lovett
Right. And that's part of the structure that follows after you get that. Why then all of that follows up on your structure and somebody who has been there done that can guide you along and make sure that each layer of that structure is being put into place so that it's kind of like the help you get a checklist together. So it goes here, here, here, here, here. And then it starts to make sense what you start structuring out your podcast.

Margo Lovett
It's a building. I always look upon it as a building. And what you get the walls, what you lay the cement floor and you get the walls up and of course, the ceiling. Then you start decorating, you decorate it. And that's where you get the equipment with the structure is how am I going to fly solo? What part of what network am I going to go with? Am I going to go with the network?

Margo Lovett
What podcast media host am I going to go with? What about my domain name? What am I going to name this show? That's a part of your structure.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Let's get specific here. Do you have any types of a favorite mics for people that are just starting out where they're not going to go crazy hog wild and spend a gazillion dollars.

Margo Lovett
This is ATR2100. I bought this long ago and I think they modified it. So that's now the are 2020 I believe. But this is a good travel mic. All you have to do as you see on the bottom, you have your headphones on, plugged in, you might just plug it into your laptop, your and your desktop and go on. Easy peasy. You don't have to do all this leveling and stuff like that. Keep it simple.

Margo Lovett
Good steady travel mic. And it's very reliable. And you speak pretty much into it. You can catch it from the side. But I have a Yeti and I don't I wish I had that handy and I don't people want to run and get those. But you have to be careful because according to what where you are podcasting, sometimes you'll get sound from all around or something from the back. So it depends on your environment. But this one, this is a work horse.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, that's an ATR what?

Margo Lovett
2100 and ATR2020 I believe is the latest addition of this.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Good. I like that. And I actually I use a Blue Yeti mic. So and there are a lot of people talk about the Blue Yeti. There are a few settings but there's not so many settings where it becomes overbearing. You're like, am I using this right now? So I love that. What's a decent mic at the Blue Yeti, I think was a one $100 or something like that, $150. It wasn't crazy.

Margo Lovett
It's not that bad. Yeah. And I think it may have gone up because everybody and their brother is trying to podcast. Let's have a look on Amazon I think was running 97 up to 120. It all depends on what you were going to get. I always have the phone and have your pop screen because with this you do need a pop screen because you get the. And it doesn't necessarily come with it but it's good mic.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What about podcast hosting? Do you have any podcast hosts that you prefer? And by the way, with my understanding, it's just like we do web hosting. Right, for what we do, you've got to have somebody who's going to host in your podcast so that people can access it and they distribute it to the different podcast networks, whether it be Google or Apple or Stitcher and all those. Yeah. What about host?

Margo Lovett
You have to have a host because those files watch something like this, that file is so big and so having people say, wow, I just want to put it on my, on my website, you, you'll crash it, you won't even get it up or the quality it take hours to get somebody that be able to listen to it. I like Captivate which is new. I think his name is Mark Orlistat from the UK that I've been watching them.

Margo Lovett
They're new, but offering a lot podcast hosting, I like them, I've been watching them, I myself am with Libsyn and Libsyn is the old granddad and I went with them and they're growing. I don't want to change because I know how to use them now. Yeah, but podcast Captivate. Wow. They and Buzzsprout. Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I use Buzzsprout.

Margo Lovett
Yeah. Talk about them because I've been watching them also. I love their newsletters. They are very progressive.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. For me as a newbie getting into it. They made it very easy. They pull out a lot of the technical side of it. It's pretty reasonable. I mean I think the plan I'm on is $12 a month or something. And I think that gives me three hours of podcasting and podcast episodes that I can upload each month, which is more than enough for what we're doing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
But yes, super easy. Their information, their onboarding, once you sign up, they're giving you all kinds of information to help you get started and take the steps you need to take. They make submitting to the different podcasting platforms really easy. Again, they provide all the directions that you need. And that was a really pretty easy process. Embedding our podcast onto our website is very easy. You just take embed code, copy-paste, put it in, and then when we put up a blog post with our video and the podcast episode, it's all right there and all people has to do is just hit play. So I can't say I have experience with anything other than Buzzsprout, but in my experience with them has been very good.

Margo Lovett
Well, you've hit on a very important part also. You have to have the player that you get from Buzzsprout or these other hosts and embed that onto your website. That's the only way that you can have you make sure that every week that or whenever you podcast, it's going to show up on your website won't have any problems.

Margo Lovett
And I'm so glad that that technology is there. And it's something that all of the platforms offer to people because they understand you can have their page, use their podcast page, which is good to start if you don't have a freestanding website. But for those of us who have a freestanding website. Oh, yeah. Run that player over there and you never have a problem.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You're good to go. So I have one more question on this getting started, and that has to do with recording your episode. I think a lot of people may go, oh gosh, do I need special software to do this? What am I going to do? And this really can be pretty easy. So from a I just want to get started. What do you think the easiest way to actually record the show is going to be for most people?

Margo Lovett
And that was a big deal for me. It really, really was. To tell you the truth, I started out with the phone for a conference call, hey, that's how I started out. But then I fell in love with Zoom. Did some stuff with Audacity. But to me, audacity is the granddaddy and everyone should understand how to use it. But it gets a bit technical for me. But I've used it to record. But Zoom, I'm just I'm gone on it.

Margo Lovett
I love it. It's easy peasy. You get your audio, you get your video, whatever you need. Go ahead. Some stuff has to go to iCloud so that you can convert it, but it's so good. And you know what? There is another let me think. Oh, my God, I just saw it and I experimented with this editing tool. Is it Allatoon? I think it's Allatoona. But they have a piece in there where you actually if you're doing a show by yourself, you actually can chat, hit the button and it's one part of their software and then you incorporate your intro music.

Margo Lovett
And then because your show is already there, you incorporate your intro music, your outro music, boom, they mix everything together. So this thing is getting so easy. But I'm sticking with the Zoom.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Most of the guest podcast spots I've had are either Zoom. Most of them are Zoom, some of them are Skype. But so again, we don't need to overcomplicate this. It's you Zoom or something like it. The thing I love about using a tool like Zoom is you're getting video, you're capturing video and audio while you're doing your episode, which from a marketing perspective gives you tons of awesome content that you can use. You've got video, you've got audio, you can repurpose that into, you can transcribe it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I think that's the best bank for your buck. It's not expensive and you can go. So just to summarize this, once you've got that, you're why, you've got kind of the structure what's my show going to look like. I get my mic. I find my podcast host. I use Zoom and I can get rolling. I just need to do it.

Margo Lovett
You can get rolling and then think on the other side. How am I going to market it? That's what you need to get in contact with Tim Fitzpatrick. Always think about how are you going to market that bad boy. Because, I mean, everybody says I don't care about the numbers. And at first you really, really shouldn't just eyeball them every day. Just let them be what they're going to be. But you're podcasting because you have a message, something that you want to get out to people. So marketing using it as a tool that it is, you have to always keep that in mind also to make sure that it goes out every week or whenever, every day on social media.

Margo Lovett
And a lot of these platforms automatically post to Facebook or LinkedIn and Twitter. They automatically go to those places for you. So always keep in mind, how am I going to market it? Because I never forget when you were a guest on my show, you said that when times get tough and everybody's looking at where they can streamline, they always start looking at marketing and the marketing should not be streamlined. That's the time to dig in and really make sure that you're showing up. I never forgot that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, you can't you can't cut it. It's that investment. So, yes, I wish podcasting was like field of dreams, where if you build it, they'll come up. But it's not. You got to get out there and market it. So that definitely is the backside. Once you've recorded your shows and got them out there. But yeah. So thank you for that. That was a nice free plug for me. Speaking of that, you've had a ton of value here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Thank you so much for taking the time. Where can people learn more about you? And hey, I want to get into podcasting. Podcasting Academy Online is a great place for people to start.

Margo Lovett
It is something that I created and I show people I teach how to imagine your podcast and how to build it at your own pace. And I give information that I paid fifteen thousand dollars to learn and more hours of experience than I care to know, care to say.

Margo Lovett
I'll just say this. What I teach at podcast Academy Online. It's the reason why when I was a part of a passionate network, it's the reason why I was able to have two million downloads and streams while I was there. Now the network had deep, deep pockets, but they pushed the show out because they believed in the show, the content, the quality of it. For me, it became proof of concept. So that lets me know the way I built my show is rock solid.

Margo Lovett
And when I left the network, I didn't miss a beat. I didn't have to tweak anything. There were no leaks in the dam. So the exact way that I built my podcast from the very beginning, that's what I teach at Podcast Academy Online. And with monetization in mind, even if you're not going to go to monetization, that's the way we build it, because you just never know.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. So that's podcastacademyonline.com.

Margo Lovett
That's right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And then you've got something special to offer folks as well, right?

Margo Lovett
Yes. Yes. I truly believe that once you get into podcasting, maybe you'll look around and decide that's not what I want to do. Or maybe you're going to be a virtual assistant for a podcaster. Podcast industry is so full of opportunity. So I came up with an ebook something for you when you text reinvention to four to eight to eight. I want to give that to. It takes a light look at podcasting and then it opens up the door to where other you need it in other areas of your graphic artist if you are a photographer, a copywriter.

Margo Lovett
There are a myriad of other things that you can do in these days. People are looking for that side hustle. They are looking for that next career and you get enough podcasters together filling this need. You've just got yourself a career. You've just opened up a brand new world. So I just want to share that information with everybody. Reinvention, test reinvention to four to eight to eight. OK, awesome.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Margot, thank you so much for taking the time. You added a ton of value and I've enjoyed the conversation once again. Thank you. For those of you that are tuning in, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. If you want to gain clarity on where to focus your marketing efforts right now to get the best return, pop on over to our website - rialtomarketing.com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O marketing dot com. Click on the get a free console button.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I guarantee you will get a ton of value from the call and you will leave there knowing where you need to focus your marketing efforts right now to get the best return. Remember, marketing your business shouldn't be a challenge. All you need is a plan. Till next time. Take care.


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About the Author Tim Fitzpatrick

Tim Fitzpatrick is the President of Rialto Marketing. At Rialto Marketing, we help service businesses simplify marketing so they can grow with less stress. We do this by creating and implementing a plan to communicate the right message to the right people. Marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the RIGHT plan.

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