How To Consistently Grow Your Revenue

October

19

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Is it possible for your business to stand out in a crowded, noisy, and competitive space? Yes, it is. Today we are going to talk about this and some of the common roadblocks businesses face in trying to consistently grow their revenue with Dean Isaacs from Vantage Group.

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How To Consistently Grow Your Revenue



Tim Fitzpatrick
Is it possible for your business to stand out in a crowded, noisy, and competitive space? The answer is yes. And we're going to dig into this and some of the common roadblocks that businesses face when trying to consistently grow their revenue. Hi. I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. I am super excited to have Dean Isaacs from Vantage Group with me today. Dean, welcome. And thanks for taking the time to be with me here.

Dean Isaacs
Thanks, Tim. This is awesome. I'm really looking forward to today's conversation. Thanks for inviting me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. Absolutely. I always enjoy having conversations with other marketers. We do a lot of the same things. I'm excited to dig into this, and it's a very important topic that we're going to talk about growing revenue, right? If we're going to get to where we want to be, we got to figure out how the heck we're going to grow our revenue. Before we do that, I want to ask you some rapid-fire questions. Help us just get to know you a little bit.

Dean Isaacs
Totally.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You ready to jump in the water with both feet here?

Dean Isaacs
Let's do it, man.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Awesome. So when you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Dean Isaacs
Outside. I like to hike. This year, we recently took up paddleboarding, which is a new experience. Manage not to fall in too many times. I like the woodwork as well.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Awesome. I love it. Okay. So my family picked up paddleboarding as well. I think we are one of the many families that have picked up paddleboarding during the pandemic, so really quickly you're in the Denver area just like I am, where are some of your favorite places to paddleboard?

Dean Isaacs
Yeah. The Bear Creek location off of 470 is on a couple of times. That's really been our most frequent place to go, and it's been good. It's not too many. It wasn't too busy. Easy to get in and out. What about you?

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I've got another one for you. Aurora Reservoir was very surprising. Pretty decent amount of water space. It's out there ways, right. It's east of 470, but super nice spot. So we really had a good time there. So you'll have to try that next season. So what's your hidden talent?

Dean Isaacs
Well, my clients tell me it's my ability to cut through all the noise and BS of the problems they're dealing with and really help them get clear quickly on how to solve the problem.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That is an awesome talent to have because we deal with a lot of noise, don't we? What's the best piece of advice that you've ever been given?

Dean Isaacs
That's a good question. I think it's, and I don't recall who told me, maybe it's sort of a combination of advice and experience. But when you slow down and really listen to your gut, listen to your intuition, without judgment, it's very rarely wrong.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's good. I like that. In order to do that, you have to cut through the noise, though. Right?

Dean Isaacs
There you go.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Dean Isaacs
I grew up in London, England, which may not be a big surprise, giving you hear my accent. But I actually came to the States to play American football, to play College football.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Really? And where did you play?

Dean Isaacs
I started out in the Bay Area in San Jose, California, and then transferred over to Mesa State in Grand Junction.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. I have no idea. We have to pick up that conversation after this interview because I grew up in the Bay Area, so I had no idea that you went to San Jose. So what does success mean to you ?

Dean Isaacs
For my business success means I have the ability to choose the people I work with. I only work with the clients I want to work with, and I'm able to help them achieve their goals. That's really my definition of success.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That is a great place to be. Where's your happy place?

Dean Isaacs
Being outside, hiking, paddle boarding now and also spending time in my woodworking, woodshop.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. And what qualities do you value in the people that you spend time with?

Dean Isaacs
People that are optimistic and positive, a huge that's really important to me and honesty and integrity that may go without saying. But those are the characteristics I look for.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Love it. So before we jump into revenue growth, tell us more about what you're doing. Vantage Group types of clients you're working with. How you're helping them.

Dean Isaacs
So I found Vantage Group back in 2010 after being a partner in a management consulting practice. We were doing things like strategic planning and business planning and kind of stuff. But really, when I started Vantage Group, I kind of looked at what I wanted to do, where I can have the biggest impact and where I had the most fun. And that was really the first half of my career in sales and marketing. And so really, that's what we do today is we help business owners really develop and execute their growth strategy. We're not a boutique marketing firm. We're not like a Sandler sales training organization. We're a consulting firm that drives revenue. So I tend to think about marketing and sales as integrated pieces of this growth strategy. So strategy first, and then we work with the owners and their teams to execute on the tactics too to make sure they achieve their goals.

Tim Fitzpatrick
We share a lot of the same philosophies on that strategy. You got tactics before strategy is a waste of time. So enough said on that. So let's talk about revenue growth. Why do so many small businesses get stuck when they're trying to consistently grow their revenue?

Dean Isaacs
There's a lot of reasons. And one of them you just said, right. Tactics before strategy, they keep trying stuff, trying new marketing ideas, trying new ways to sell and close business, trying to build their referral base, and they just keep throwing stuff against the wall from seeing what sticks. So I think that's one of the most common reasons why. But if you think about small business owners, people that are our own operators, they're in the business, they're making the decisions, they're driving the business forward. The business owner is usually the biggest reason businesses don't grow. Their capacity to do work. If everything's got to flow across their desk for decisions, there's only so many hours in the day, right? There's a limit. They will limit the growth of business. I think the other part of that is a lot of small businesses started because Tim was a great marketer, and you decided he wanted to start a marketing practice. Great. Off we run and you built the business or the business one builds the business based on their relationships and their connections. And that's where the first few clients come in. And they never really figured out how to create consistency in terms of lead generation and selling. It's my relationships. And as soon as my relationships stop buying from me, my business doesn't grow. Another limiting factor is around the business owner. And so then you get into how does the business want to think about the business? How can they create a team to delegate to? How do they replicate themselves or that selling function that they've been stone kind of tied into? So there's a lot of moving parts. But I see a lot of it is the owner and all their team and then the nature of how they interact with their clients in the market.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So I have a couple questions to dig into this a little more. One of the first things you mentioned was they jump into tactics first without really having a strategy, which is a problem. Do you also feel or see with a lot of the clients you work with that they're impatient and they don't give the tactics enough time to gain traction?

Dean Isaacs
100% right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay.

Dean Isaacs
So I can't tell you how many times I sat down with a client and we've talked through strategy, right. And they said we tried that it didn't work.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Dean Isaacs
So we get into that. All right. Tell me more about that. How did you do it? What did you do? How long did you try it for? Did you iterate and make adjustments? Well, we tried it for two months. We did this thing for two months, and then it just didn't work. I'm not doing it anymore. Well, if it's something that takes six months to really fully develop, then yeah. I could have told you before you began that two months wasn't enough or the impatience is a big thing.

Dean Isaacs
I think the other is is they see other people in similar businesses doing things and they try and replicate that they fall into the trap of looking like and sounding like their competition.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. They just become another me too. So the other thing you touched on, too, was referral, right? A lot of us start to grow our business through referral in the beginning. Do you believe that referrals is a scalable channel, or do you think that it's difficult to scale referrals? People feel differently about this? So I'm curious to get your take on this.

Dean Isaacs
Yeah. I think that's a really interesting question. I think it's scalable to a point. Right? To build your personal referral network takes your time. It's a lot of effort. And as your business grows, you become the victim of your own success as the business owner, because then you're in helping with service delivery, dinner with clients, back office, you know, accounting, all that other stuff. So the things that you did to make your business successful, you're no longer doing. That's where it's hard to scale your referral base. Now, I think we can spend some time talking about referrals. I have a whole philosophy on that. But I think people tend to go wide and stay wide in terms of meeting lots of people for too long. I think you have to go wired to meet the right number of people to then focus your energy on that small handful that generate referrals on a regular basis. So you can scale that because you're much more selective. So to a point, you can scale it. But I do think there's a limit to that. But then if you're bringing on business developers, let's say that their responsibility used to build or nurture their network. You can scale that way. But I also think that creating this concept for being a thought leader in your space and your ability to generate referrals and inbound as well.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So at some point, a lot of the businesses you work with hit a ceiling with referrals, and that's why they're coming to you to break through that.

Dean Isaacs
Exactly. Or if they're really early stage and, you know, somebody came out of corporate and they've started their own business, they don't even know how to get going. They've been having coffees and breakfast and lunches for the last six months, and they haven't been able to generate introductions from their referral partners where they're approaching that active, generating referrals in the wrong way. It can be anywhere on the continuum, but generally speaking, they hit ceiling at some point. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love your idea of, hey, you got to go wide in the beginning, but then you really have you have to cut through the noise and find the right people to continue to nurture and build those relationships. Do you feel like again, people feel differently about this. Do you feel like your referral partner should be compensated in some way, shape or form? Does that incentivize them more?

Dean Isaacs
Much like most of my answer, it depends. Right. I think there are some industries I know there are some industries that cannot be compensated for referrals. There are other industries that expect to be paid for referrals. So I think that's a conversation you have with your individual referral partners and you establish that early on, what is the nature of this relationship? And so there is no, like, weird or awkwardness when the person wants to refer and they like, are you gonna pay me? That should never be an issue. Just cut through BS. Right. Let's get this at this. If we feel like after a series of meetings that we have really good synergy, let's talk about it. Me personally, I actually don't want to be financially compensated. Quite honestly, I want my referral partners to feel like they owe me and they want to refer me. Maybe it's even with a mutual client. I want them to be thinking about new business for me because that few dollars, they flip me, that's great. But any future client is probably has higher value in so many ways than the fee they will pay me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Got it. Makes perfect sense. We've gone through a lot of changes the last couple of years. How have you seen sales and marketing change? And what can business owners do to learn from all these changes?

Dean Isaacs
Yeah. There are two or three things that come to mind. I think that the first if we go back to the first half of the pandemic, where we shifted to virtual interactions overnight, literally overnight. Things like trade shows and networking in person and face-to-face sales calls just evaporated. They went away. And so there was a period of time where business owners and business developers and marketers went, what do I do? There was a lot of reaction. And so we started to figure out how to move to a more virtual marketing and sales environment. But more than that, we start in the back half of the pandemic, people started to really crave human-to-human contact with physical distancing. We're all stuck in our home offices or our basements or wherever we're working from home. And we really excited to crave just as human beings. That human-to-human interaction, and that now has really embedded itself in I believe, in how people want to be marketed to and they want to be sold to. So this concept of sending more generic emails out doesn't resonate anymore. There's just so much noise. I mean, if you're on LinkedIn, you're getting pinged all the time with really just generic pitches all the time. I get sold probably twice a week. Actually, sometimes it feels like twice a day I get messages from people trying to sell me the stuff that I actually do. Generic. Right. So the concept of human interaction, personalized interaction is one big shift. Then we were headed there anyway. But that next level of personalization, I think, is something that we can all take a lesson from because that's one of the ways that you could get above the noise.

Tim Fitzpatrick
How do you see people actually taking action on that and implementing some of that personalized interaction? What are they doing?

Dean Isaacs
Well, there's certainly a lot of technology platforms that support this. Good marketing automation tools. A good CRM can help you to do that. But I think it starts in my mind, it starts with really understanding your ideal buyer pesona. Hare this kind of term of ideal client profile, persona, avatar, all this stuff. But I am what I think of is do we really understand who the buyer is today? Who our target prospect is? And the state that they're in today? I actually think that there should be two buyer personas. There's the current state, and then there's the future state, and we tend to think about the future state. Right. Or it's the CEO that's doing all this cool stuff and that's who we want to sell to. I think that's less important than the person defining the persona of where they're at today. And if you can really clearly define that, you can build your messaging around that and it feels very personal. Versus Tim, you've got a marketing agency. I can help you generate more leads. I mean, you could take Tim and marketing agency out and put anything in there, and it still applies. It's so generic.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. I love that. It's not necessarily personalizing, "Hey, you went to San Jose State." It's understanding where you're at as an ideal client and talking about that where they go, "Oh, my gosh. You know, Dean gets me."

Dean Isaacs
Yeah. I mean, you just hit it. There are two levels of personalization. There's more general personalization that focuses on the persona. The issues they're dealing with, the challenges they're facing, so you can speak to them. It feels personal. And then that next level of personalization is doing research on that individual person taking that personal relations to the next level. So depending on your business and the volume of leads you need to create and kind of your infrastructure and your timing. There's a lot of factors, at least defining the persona and marketing to that is your barrier for enter. I mean, you've got to start there. And maybe once you've had some interaction with this market and maybe an individual has raised their hand in a way, let's say they downloaded the white paper or watch the video of yours, then you can take it to the next level of personalization, which is in the individual. But this generic selling to a CPA firm because it doesn't work. So I think that's one of the big shifts is an acceleration to personalization. And the other thing that comes to mind when you ask them what's changed is buyers continue to change the way they buy. Right. And really, it's been going on for the last few years, but the last year and a half two years. It's accelerated that. And what I mean by that is especially in B2B, buyers are 70 or more percent of the way through their decision-making process before they want to talk to a sales guy. And so you're selling your ability to sell early in the buyers journey, I'm a big believer in understanding the buyers journey, is your marketing content. And if your marketing content resonates with the persona, there's a high likelihood that you're going to get to the short-list. They're going to pre-qualify you by looking at your stuff online, and then they're going to be willing to talk to you, your sales guy or you right. So that's accelerated. And what I think has happened is business developers. Salespeople are selling like it's 2015, but they're not selling like it's 2021 2022. The buyer and the seller are out of sync, and it's the seller's fault, not the buyer's fault. So that alignment is a really big miss.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So the seller, in a lot of cases, is not realizing they're not meeting the buyer where they're at. Then the buyer is much more highly educated or informed. Now then they were three to five years ago.

Dean Isaacs
Totally. Yeah. So if I get an opportunity to have a conversation and I believe sales is a series of conversations with my prospect and I enforce them to buy like, I want to sell, and I take them right back to the beginning. They're going to get frustrated and you're going to create friction, and it's not going to move as quickly as smoothly as you'd like. But with the right kind of discovery, it doesn't matter whether you're selling products or services or software or whatever it is. The right kind of discovery, the right kind of alignment. You can actually shorten the sales cycle dramatically because they're already halfway down the road. And they've selected you to a conversation. So there's a lot of misalignment, really. And the other thing is that sales training traditionally has been getting to the clothes, get into the clothes, get into the clothes, and that repels prospects. It doesn't bring them in. Right thing will being sold to so all just approach to having a conversation of building a relationship and that consultative selling and all those things to tag those words we hear they're not being executed well, and that actually pushes you out of pushes the prospect out of your sales funnel versus moving and down the sales funnel.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I want to touch on something that you talked about, which was understanding your ideal clients, where they are currently, but also where they want to be in the future. What's your process like to actually get to that place where you understand them? What steps do you take to do that?

Dean Isaacs
If you're a business that has clients, then that's the place to start. So it's maybe let's touch on that first. This may seem like a radical concept, but talk to your customers, right. What a concept. Talk to your customers. Talk to new customers, talk to older customers. Talk to people that have struggled with your services. You haven't been 100% perfect on your delivery, mix it up and ask them some very simple questions. Why did you buy from us? What was going on in your business at the time that caused you to look for a solution to the problem? Who else did you look at? How did you compare what was your thought process and decision-making process when you made that decision, as you eliminating other potential providers. If you ask those three or four questions off 15% of your client base, all of a sudden, you get really clear on what's important to your customers. And then the other thing I would say is take that information and create a one sentence description of that profile. That persona. Struggling CEO that is burnt out and never has time to scale the business. That's it. And that at least gives you some structure. And then below that, add the characteristics. So they don't have a team that they can delegate to. They haven't figured out how to systemate the lead generation. Go back. Whatever it is. All of that helps you define your target persona based on customers you're currently working with. That you're having an impact on versus the proverbial, let's make up this random Bob. The buyer persona, a master's degree from MIT. That's garbage. It's fictitious. It doesn't apply.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. How many buyer personas ideally, do you think a company should have? Or is there a Max?

Dean Isaacs
The fewer of the beter. I was actually talking to a client last night about this exact subject, and we realize they truly have two. Two buyers. May have the small business owners or owner operator, and they have the CEO or VP of Sales type of persona. Two different personas. And they really do have those two that we could have probably flushed out more, but two made the most sense because that's a bulk where they are qualified prospects come from. And so now once we sort of flush that out, we realized that they care about different things. You and I, small business owners. We do a lot of stuff in our business. It's different to the CEO with the executive team and the VP of Sales that's running the sales or. So you have to create your messaging and you're content that resonates with those personas. So he has less. He has two messaging tracks now that we need to develop, and we need to get the right prospect onto the right track. And one way we're going to do it is add one simple question to the form that people fill out to get content, whether it's a white paper or webinar, whatever. And the simple question is, do you manage your sales team? And maybe we need to say, do you manage a sales team of three or more? We'll figure out it. But that act of managing a sales team put somebody on a different track to that solo business owner. We can create messaging and a content experience that's different. But also it gets him to the same point. So if you had 10 personas, that's a lot of content joggle.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I always say one to three, no more than three. Where a lot of people, I think hit a roadblock or a monkey on their back is when we talk about narrowing down who your ideal clients are, we're not saying those are the only people that you're ever going to do business with. All we're saying is these are the people you are going to direct your marketing efforts towards because you already know that they are going to be ideal people. So you're still going to get referrals or people coming to you that don't fit that mold. But you now have the ability to make a choice. Are they going to be a good fit for you, or are they not?

Dean Isaacs
Absolutely. Yeah. I'm working with a client, a software client right now, and they sell, they sell an application for a very particular industry. And so we had this whole conversation about buyer personas and targets and that kind of stuff. And what we realized was there are some industries that they want to target. So that's sort of one level of niching down. Right. And then they said, well, we sell to this persona in the organization and that role and this job on that. And they had this hole in their mind, this complex sales environment. But really, the truth was their primary point of contact, their primary champion to get deals done was one particular role. All the other people were involved in the decision, which we don't care about. But we're not marketing to those people. We're selling to them. But we're not marketing. So we're marketing for that single persona. And it was like a light bulb moment. We don't have to market to this person, that person in finance. And no, your point of entry is this individual and then you expand from there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you just made their job that much easier. They're hyper focused. They know exactly who they need to reach. Right. So if they're doing outreach on LinkedIn, they're not worried about five different positions within a company. They're worried about one. So much easier. Awesome. I love where this conversation is going. So how can businesses stand out in a crowded, noisy, and competitive space? You touched on this a little bit earlier, but let's let's dig into this.

Dean Isaacs
Yeah. I love this question because it's probably the number one challenge that business owners face. Right. If you go on LinkedIn consistently over, let's say the last three to five years you probably saw in the last year, 18 months. How much noisier, it became. We're all getting root requests to connect and immediately we're getting these generic sales pitches. There's just so much garbage, quite honestly. And it's not just LinkedIn. It's all the social platforms, it's online, it's everywhere we go. So for me, where I start is the two things we really talked about understanding your buyer, right? And what's important to them. What are the problems and challenges they're trying to solve for? And speak to that. I think about messaging kind of in a couple of phases. You got to have this broad enough message to grab eyeballs. And the way we do that is to speak to the problems that are really defined target personas are trying to solve. We know that's one way to do it. The other way is or in addition to, I should say, is not putting the same content out that everybody else is putting out around those topics. Pick an industry. You can probably find some dogma. Right. So some sort of standard thing that the industry believes is true and you can probably pick holes in it. So find one of those things. That's the standard the norm in that your target market industry. I'll find a way to talk about it differently. Pick holes in it, put your sort of flag in the ground and say, this is the thing. I'm going to build my messaging around because it will get eyeballs0 if we believe that, let's say all CPAs built their business through referrals only. Right. That's the standard belief in the accounting wall. Say, that's the case. If you can figure out a way to oppose that, talk about it differently, have a stance, have a message. People are going to say wait a minute, Tim's talking about this thing differently. That's going to help you stand out from the crowd. So I think those are really, really important. The other is not to do all of your content is how to content educational content. I know you believe in having a mixed kind of variety of messages. You look at a lot of the content that's out there. It's all about how to in some form of fashion. Educational, but it's not, it's really not any different to anybody else. So I think your education of how-to content isn't important. One of the pillars of your content. It shouldn't be 90% or 100% of your content. Maybe it's a third of your content.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, one of the things you touched on earlier was the buyer's journey, right. And for those people that don't know what that is, the way I define the buyer's journey. Is it's just that experience that a prospect and customer have from the minute they think about working with the company like yours all the way through buying and doing repeat and referral business. And I know you and a lot of people look at that as a funnel. It's really not because you're missing the whole bottom part of that. And repeat and referral is huge. So what you're really touching on here is you have to create content that meets people at all the various phases of the buyer's journey.

Dean Isaacs
Yeah. And I would even add to that, Tim, and say that I believe the buyers journey begins when the business owner identifies a problem in the business that they want to spend time with resources and to solve even before they start looking for those resources. This is our Q4 goals to fix this thing. That's where their journey begins. So your content that speaks to the problem in a unique enough way. We'll capture that wide market that wide survives. So now all of a sudden, Tim, my prospect said things be talking about this thing differently. I see that now it gets into my sort of messaging world, my messaging ecosystem, where then I can get narrower and more specific with the content to move them through the journey. So they got to go through that 60 70% of the buyers journey before they want to talk to me, my stuff, they realize that I get it. They care about me understanding their problem before they care about how I solve the problem. So that well crafted messaging will move them through that process. That journey to the point where they raise their hand somehow. They want to do a demo. They want to talk to the sales guy they download the white paper. That's now kind of lead, right. Is it marketing qualified to lead? Maybe. But at least I've interacted with your brand in the way that you can measure, and then you can continue to nurture that throughout the rest of the journey.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it, man. I really appreciate you digging into this. I always enjoy talking shop. Any last-minute thoughts, words of wisdom you want to leave us with?

Dean Isaacs
Yeah. So I would say, don't try too many things all at once when it comes to marketing especially right. There's a lot of plenty objects out there. Just pick a social platform, right? You got a million to choose from. So, don't try too many things, give them enough time to develop. What we talked about is actually before our call. How long can we stick with something? Well, it depends on what the tactic is you're talking about, but give it enough time and enough iterations and testing to fully flush out, is this thing going to work? And pick it based on your target persona. Right. Where are they hanging out? What are they doing to find resources and align with that? So I think that's a big one. And then talk to your customers. Like I said, talk to your clients, understand where they're at. See what's gone on. Their business probably has changed a lot in the last couple of years. How has it changed? How is that going to impact who you sell to in the future?

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that advice Dean because I think if all you were to do was that one thing and interview existing and past clients. The information you will glean from that is invaluable. I think so many people overlook it. But, man, we can't see the forest through the trees in our business. Our customers can, though, and we just need to talk to them and ask the right questions.

Dean Isaacs
Yeah. It's so valuable.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it, guys. If you love what Dean is saying here, you want to connect with them, Dean, where's the best place for them to go and reach out?

Dean Isaacs
I'm pretty easy to find. You can Google Vantage Group Denver and you'll find me. I'm pretty much on the first page of Google there. Or you can just go find me on LinkedIn. Look up my name and LinkedIn connect with me. Let me know that you saw the live I'd love to connect and provide any advice I can.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. Guys, he's at The Vantage GRP dot com. And then on LinkedIn. It's LinkedIn dot com forward slash in forward slash Dean Isaacs and that's I-S-A-A-C-S. I always have to think twice when I'm spelling your name because it two A's or is it two C's. I feel like I'm going to botch this.

Dean Isaacs
Yeah, you got it right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Awesome. Well, thank you so much for spending time with me today, Dean. I appreciate it. For those of you watching listening, if you're struggling with your marketing, you're trying different tactics. Nothing's working. You're not sure what the next right step is. You can always hop on over to our website at Rialto Marketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing dot com. Click on the Get a free Consult button. Be happy to chat with you and give you some clarity on what your next step should be. Thanks so much, guys. Until next time. Take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

Do you know you have an opportunity for revenue growth and are unsure how to make it happen? Do you lack someone with the time, skill set, and desire to take ownership of marketing to drive results?

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