How To Find Your Voice And Tell Your Story To Connect With Your Target Market

How To Find Your Voice And Tell Your Story To Connect With Your Target Market

What is your company’s voice? Why is it even important? How can you best tell your story to connect and engage with your audience? We are going to dig into these questions with Shane Borza from Shane Borza Coaching.

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How To Find Your Voice And Tell Your Story To Connect With Your Target Market



Tim Fitzpatrick
What is your company's voice and why is that even important? Better yet, how can you best tell your story to connect and engage with your audience? Our special guest today has the answers to these questions and he is going to share them with us. Can't wait to dig into this. I'm super excited. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. I am super excited to have with me today Shane Borza from Shane Borza Coaching. Shane, welcome, and thanks for taking the time to be here.

Shane Borza
Yeah, I appreciate the invite. Really excited to talk to your audience. Thank you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, absolutely. We're going to dig into this. I love talking about story in marketing, so I think we're going to have a really good conversation today. Before we jump into that, I want to ask you some rapid-fire questions to help us get to know you a little bit. You ready to jump into this?

Shane Borza
Yeah, let's do it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, so when you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Shane Borza
My wife and I are avid climbers and we live in Las Vegas, so we have Red Rocks right outside, which is awesome.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, nice. What's your hidden talent?

Shane Borza
I am really good at kind of building small teams, so not one hundred people, but like ten people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK. What's the best piece of advice that you've ever been given?

Shane Borza
When I was younger, I went through a bad breakup and a friend of mine, his dad told him when he had gone through a bad breakup, don't worry about finding the one, worry about being the one. That started me on all that self work, you know.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, yes, that that is that's actually really awesome advice. That's probably one of the best answers to that question I've ever heard. So working on yourself, you will naturally then attract the one that's right for you. Cool. I love it. What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Shane Borza
I am a ridiculously huge Prince fan. I mean, I have like, it probably every album he's ever released, like six thousand tracks like I love Prince.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, OK, what does success mean to you?

Shane Borza
Being balanced but in a holistic whole person way. So not just balance work-life but balance between, like, my fitness or like mind, body, spirit, all the different aspects of myself.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Shane Borza
Yosemite.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, that's a pretty damn good place, man. Now, have you climbed there?

Shane Borza
I have. Actually fun fact my wife and I had the world's first wedding on a ledge on El Capitan in Yosemite.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Really? Very cool.

Shane Borza
About it and everything.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that. What's the climbing Free Solo? Did you ever see that?

Shane Borza
Oh, yes. Actually, a friend of mine who works in Yosemite worked on that film and he said they were all terrified.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I'm telling you, gosh, if people are watching or listen to this, if you have not watched Free Solo, it is an amazing movie. I don't care if you don't like climbing. It is just man, some of the stuff in there is absolutely amazing. And man, that guy is crazy, but he's also extremely talented. Right?

Shane Borza
And it was amazingly well shot too.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Shane Borza
To think they're down three thousand feet below him and shooting through telescopes. Like what.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Shane Borza
Incredible.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. Now did they do some drone footage there, too, as well?

Shane Borza
Yes. They had to get it because it's inside a national park where flying drones is illegal. They had to get special permits to do some of those things. But luckily, because technically is a National Geographic film, there is a lot of clout behind this. They're able to do some things that normal people would want to do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I'm telling you, man, my palms were sweaty, like 90 percent of that movie is. So what qualities do you value in the people with whom you spend time?

Shane Borza
So I'll just go to my default value list, which is faith, truth, beauty and strength. And I think those are all not really important individually, but they can work together. So like having a strong sense of faith, whether that's religious faith or faith in your family or faith in your abilities. So that would be my go-to answer.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Very good. So tell us more about what you're doing at Shane Borza Coaching. What people you're helping? Let's dig into that.

Shane Borza
So two main aspects, one is helping people work on both their mental and physical fitness together, because if you have a healthy mind and a sick body, you're not going to do very well, maybe have a healthy body, but a sick mind, you're not going to do really well. You have to really focus on the two getting rid of anger and stress and poor communication and kind of addressing making a plan like you don't know what your values are, you don't know what your vision and vision are, and it's really hard to have any sense of purpose or what to do. And if your diet and exercise and sleep are all terrible or you have some kind of illness or you're always sick, then you're not going to have the energy or the ability to go out and do stuff. And so I really like to bring those two kind of specialties together as opposed to just one or the other. And I coach through a lot of different I consult with different companies and things like that. And so I'll help people in that way. But my other big thing, and this is one of my lifelong passions being a filmmaker, is I work with content creators and I coach people not only on giving themselves permission, I work for this one person. They said, I've been wanting to write a book for 20 years. So for 20 years they haven't let themselves do this thing. And so sometimes it's just like it's not so much teaching them what to do, it's removing the obstacle. But also it's been teaching them how to do it so well. How do you write a book? What's the process? Where do you start? What do you do when the book's done? How do you put it out there? And so I think that's a little bit more about what we're going to talk about today, because everyone has a story, whether you're a company or an individual person, and it's just figuring out how to tell that story in the right way so it lands for the right people. So you can then connect with them and then sell your book, sell your product to market yourself, whatever it might be.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, yeah. There's a lot it's not just with marketing, but I think there's a lot that we can apply from other industries, other verticals into our own business if we just know how to adapt it. And there's so much to learn from a marketing perspective, from storytelling and film. So I think people will start to see this as we dig into this. So let's first talk about voice, like I guess we'll probably start by, like, just what is a company voice? Then we can start to talk about why is finding it important and how do you go about doing that.

Shane Borza
So whether you're a person or a brand. One of the first things, it's like the old expression, you know, know thyself, you can't be true to yourself if you don't know what your truth is. And so some of this and big companies, of course, they have teams of people to do this on TV shows. They have writers rooms. They sit around for weeks and figure out like what's what story we tell, who's the main character, why do we care about them? But if you're a solopreneur or your side hustling or you're just doing a startup, it might just be you all by yourself and asking yourself, I have thing what I call the power questions. And so the first section, which is all about finding your voice, is asking yourself, who are you? What do you do and what is your brand? Because that's going to be very different than who you are as a person. Me as a filmmaker and me as a coach with a coaching practice, those are kind of two different sets of answers to those questions. And one of the things that I learned in film school, but also in coach school, is if you say, "Oh, I want to be a coach." You feel very differently about yourself than if you say "I am a coach." And so part of finding your voice is figuring out like, ah, is it OK for you to hear yourself say, I'm an entrepreneur, I'm a business owner, I am a leader. And if you kind of recoil from that, maybe there's some kind of inner work, like, why can I not accept this? Because if you don't believe in yourself, no one else will believe it. And so a lot of this stuff is self-focused first, because if it doesn't make sense to us, it's not clear to us we don't believe it, then it's not going to make sense or be clear or believable to anyone else. And so sitting down and taking some time, it's OK sometimes to not have the blank filled in with an immediate answer. I think it's good to sometimes to go, well, "Who am I really? What do I want to do? I don't know what I want to do. Let me sit and think about it." And then maybe a week goes by, then you get the right answer. There's no rush. You'll be better served a year from now. If you take a week to figure it out, then you'll have the first thing that pops in your head be the answer and then you spend a year going in the wrong direction.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I want to bring these power questions up one more time. Let me make sure I got these right. Who are you? What do you do and what is your brand?

Shane Borza
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, so that's how we can start to find that company voice. How would you say? How does company voice relate to personality? They seem pretty similar to they're intertwined, right?

Shane Borza
Yes, yes. And it's just like people you'll have people who are very reserved and quiet and they speak in a way that kind of reflects the way they carry themselves. The physicality, the way they interact with others. And then people who are very boisterous and very outgoing. And they're loud and they're talking and they're always laughing and they're very gregarious and their physicality in their voice or their presence, all those things will kind of be in alignment. So I think the same as with a company. And you'll see, I mean, the people who shop at Forever 21 and the people shop at Nordstrom's are very different because the feel, the tone, the colors, the designs, everything is marketed towards young people versus older, more professional people. And so the voice and the presence of those two companies, they sound different, they look different, they feel different. And if you find yourself in the opposite store, you're probably going to feel very out of place.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Shane Borza
Because you're like, this isn't for me. You're like, no, it's not. But leaning into that polarization can be really helpful. And you want people to be able to select in or out very quickly as opposed to who is this for? I don't know. It seems like it's for everyone, which means it's for no one. But really clearly establishing, you know, if you're Nike or your Reebok that sure, you could say that both shoe companies, but Reebok is all about the prospect games and some of that kind of stuff, and as Nike's much more like basketball and branding professional athletes in major sports and things like that. So it's very kind of clear their voice things like Just Do It from Nike, we all know that. And without thinking about it, we can just see the swoosh with no words whatsoever. In the voice, that image literally says to us, just do it. So the voice has been so clearly established that even when nothing is said or read, we still hear that voice speaking to us. And that's an example of how clear voice can resonate and impacts people. And it may not resonate with you. Maybe you're like, I don't even wear sneakers. I wear dress shoes and flip-flops or whatever it might be. But you're able to select in or out immediately because you know exactly what that image means and exactly what that voice is saying.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So the voice really, when done consistently, it helps people start to either identify or not with the brand. Right. And it builds the image of what that brand is all about.

Shane Borza
Yes, exactly. And the same could be done. Like think of a brand, especially like what I would call a legacy band so like Aerosmith or Metallica or CPC, bands that are in their fourth or fifth decade. They have a specific sound like you can put AC/DC on especially, and pretty much everyone is going to be like, is this AC/DC? Like, you can't tell what song it is or what album it's from, but it has a very distinct, in this context, voice.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Shane Borza
And you know, can you believe it, they just released a new album this year? I cannot believe it. They're all like in their 70s. It sounds exactly like an AC/DC album and yet if you go to one of their shows, like, you know exactly what you're going to get and they're very consistent. So one of the things that's important is as an artist, you want to make different things. People want to write different kinds of books and what have you. But it's still going to be under that umbrella of This is who I am and this is what I do, and this is my brand. Even if you're doing different things like Nike, Reebok, they make a wide array of products, clothing, equipment, shoes, but it's still within the brand that they've established for themselves and it still very quickly and very easily identifiable as this company as opposed Toms shoes and Nike will never be confused for each other.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, so I'm going to go off the beaten path here, I'm going to tell you quick, funny AC/DC story. So I have two kids. Taking them to school in the mornings, I used to play like old music from the 80s and 90s, which is really when I grew up. So I to get them pumped up for school, I used to play AC/DC Thunderstruck and they associate his voice in that song is so just raspy and everything. They just thought, they thought it sounded like Donald Duck. So they're always like, "Hey, can you play the Donald Duck song?" Well that was Thunderstruck from AC/DC. So anyways, that's that. So let's talk about story. We found our voice kind of got our personality, what we want to be, how we want to be recognized and known. What are some of the biggest mistakes you see companies making when telling their story?

Shane Borza
So first, just like I mentioned, like the writers room or any other kind of production, there's no one person I'm going to guess you have like a director or a writer, but there's a team. And quite often someone is either, like I mentioned earlier, a solopreneur. So they're doing everything by themselves or you have someone who is just like, it's my way or the highway. And in either situation, the problem is if they don't get feedback or any kind of review or check in with someone else, then the thing that goes out, whether it's a product or some kind of marketing campaign or what have you, won't land because it doesn't make sense or it's not in line with the brand or story or voice that that product a company has. And the reason why I mean, a major Hollywood film, they'll be several executive producers, several producers, several associate producer. It becomes a team of producers, much less editors, much less, there's a director, there's an assistant director. And all these people have meetings together and they discuss all these different options, like what should the outfits look like? Where should we shoot this? What's the best size of the cast? How many extras do they need? They get really into the minutia and they make very specific choices for definitive reasons. And if you just go, "Hey, this makes sense to me and I'm going to do it." And you don't check in with someone else, you don't get the feedback, you don't get the perspective outside you, you may have forgotten a crucial aspect because it's in your head. And so you just know what it means. And someone else doesn't have that information. They're like, this doesn't make any sense to me. And therefore your whole campaign will fail or it will not connect with your audience or it'll drive the audience away. Because as you as you know, a confused mind says no.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Shane Borza
And you don't want any ambiguity whatsoever. You want, again, people to say, "This is awesome. This is for me. You can't stop me. I'm going to buy this." And be a super fan for life or "This is crap. I don't like it. Don't show that to me again." Either way, there's no confusion whatsoever. So you don't create a team, you don't find a partner or you don't hire somebody to do that check in and to give you and it's hard sometimes when you're all excited about something and someone shoots it down, it's like, no, it's not good enough or this is terrible or I know you really want to do this, but this is a bad idea.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Shane Borza
And so that's the biggest mistake I see people make.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, so not getting outside eyes. Totally agree with you on that, especially I think one of the things that's so hard for us as business owners is we struggle to see the forest through the trees when it comes to our business. We can't think about it objectively. And so getting those outside eyes I think can be really, really helpful. What I want to hone in on here, too, with story is when we talk about story, are we talking about, like, you know, the company history and that story, or are we more talking about the story that we are inviting our prospects and our customers into, or are we talking about both?

Shane Borza
I would definitely say it's both. So I mentioned Tom's Shoes earlier and like Nike earlier. So for me, I was a runner. So I love that kind of legacy history that Nike has of like Bill Barrowman making shoes on the waffle iron for the University of Oregon, the runners with pre-Fontain like in his shed in the backyard, and he slowly formulated Nike shoes. And I'm like, oh, that's so cool. I love that story. But the other story I mentioned is that swoosh is not a swoosh anymore, that swoosh is the new alphabet, that swoosh means just do it without using letters. And that's the story that everyone, especially now that Nike is on every professional sports player there is, at least in America, you see the swoosh on every jersey. It's on soccer balls. It's on socks. It's on everything. We subconsciously watched those people in Nike uniforms do things that we want to do and we think, well, if I have that stuff, then I can do it too, because the story is, hey, I'm doing this and I have this stuff. This stuff is helping me to just do it so you can just get this stuff and then you can just do it. And so it is very much both of those things. Tom's Shoes, for instance, I forgot the guy's name, but he was doing some trips overseas and he wanted to give back. And so he decided one for you, one for them. And every time somebody bought a pair of Tom's shoes, they would then donate a pair of shoes to a child in need. And that story became a runaway sensation. And Tom's shoes kind of went from nothing to this huge company all of a sudden. And the story again there is, oh, we love the legacy history, creation kind of myth to go back to the story we're talking about at the beginning with you have the guide and you have the person, so the myth is this person went on a trip and they became enlightened when they realized that people were suffering and they wanted to figure out a solution. But the story to the individual person is, I'm not buying shoes for me. I'm getting a pair of shoes because I bought a pair of shoes for someone else. I don't even know who needs them. And that makes me feel good about myself. And so it really is the combination of the two things. And really what's important, of course, and I'm sure, you know, this is the context. If you have a coach over here who's just like my whole life has been great and I'm really good at everything, so just hire me and I'll help you be good at stuff, too. And you're like, OK, or you have a coach over here is like I've gone through horrible stuff. I learned so many things by dealing with all this adversity. I got through it. And I want to teach you all the hard won lessons I learned. Like, wow, that's an amazing story. And if you just said, hey, we have to coaches here and they're both good at stuff without that context. It would not help you connect with the story that speaks to you. And so if you are afraid or unable to tell that kind of background story. You're going to miss out on half of the storytelling.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It seems like there's some timing that needs to happen here. And correct me if I'm wrong or beg to differ, that's totally OK. But it seems like we need to tell that story first where we're inviting the prospect into this story because they have to care about us first before they're going to even be interested in hearing our actual story and why we're doing what we're doing. Am I on the right track there?

Shane Borza
Yes. And to go to media again, as an example, if you want someone to go see a two-hour movie, you don't show up to our movie. You show a two-minute trailer. If you want to buy an album, you don't play them the one-hour album. You give them a single. And so now you have this little bite-sized snippet kind of teaser that makes people, again, select in or out like, oh, I heard the new single, it's crap. I'm never going to get that album. Or like I heard the new single. It's so amazing. I bought the album on Pre Order, and I'm just waiting for it. So the same sort of thing with your story. If you watch a TED talk, those speakers have perfected the art of coming on stage and introducing themselves in such a way that if you were about to get up and walk out, you're like, well, I got to listen to this now. You got me for 20 more minutes because that opening salvo was so effective that I'm, like, totally hooked. And that's a skill. And you need to learn how to do that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
We can't tell our story until we first get them interested. We've still we've got their attention and they've shown interest. OK, good. I think that's an important distinction for people to get because I think a lot of people, especially from a marketing standpoint, tend to talk too much about themselves. And our customers really don't care about that, at least in the beginning. Right. We need to grab their attention to let them know, hey, this is a problem you have. I know exactly how to solve it. Or this is a result you're looking for, I know how to get you there. Once you bring them in, then you can tell them about your background story and your philosophy and why you think this way and how you can help them. But they're not going to care about that until you grab their attention first. Right. So let's talk about some tips to really help people that are watching or listening to this. What are your top three tips for helping businesses find that voice and tell their story?

Shane Borza
So we were talking a little bit before we started recording today and the time to put it into three parts, I take basically the production model from filmmaking, and I teach people that skill set for either business or making their own content, and that is solving the problem of the three aspects of creation, which is the pre production, and that is getting yourself organized, asking yourself a lot of questions, doing all the pre work before you actually make something. And if you don't take the time to set yourself up in preproduction, that's establishing, you know, I want to start a new company. What am I going to do? Who do I need? Do I need backing? Do I need a loan? How come I get? Where am I going to do need to know. That's all preproduction. Figuring out. I want to write a book. OK, is it going to be a print book? An ebook? Is it a novel? Is it a how to book? Do you need an editor or a copywriter? Like can you do it yourself.?What are you going to do for? That's all stuff you need to figure out in preproduction before you go into the actual production. Productions where you make the thing. And that's an entirely separate stage. And then the third stage is post-production. And that's OK. We made it, now we need to edit it. Market it. We need to export it, we need to upload it, we need to distribute it, all three of those sections are. Separate entities, they all have their own challenges, they all require different skill sets, they all require perhaps different hires. You need different teammates for each one of those three things. If you think of making things, making a company, making a product, making some art, making content as just one step, you will not succeed, so my three tips are learn how to do the pre the production and the post as three separate pieces and doing all three of those well will get your content out into the marketplace or create your company in a good light. If you just think we just need to make the company. Take a couple of weeks or months or years to figure all of that stuff out so you can have a successful launch at some point at the end, but if you're a car manufacturer, they know, OK, we have cars rolling off the assembly line. Well, people don't go to the car manufacturer to get the car. So you have this whole complicated set of systems to get cars off the assembly line to dealerships all over the country. That's all that kind of post-production network type of thing. So it applies to everything, not just filmmaking or album making or anything like that. It can very much apply to business. It's not a three bullet points so much, but it's learning preproduction, production, post-production as concepts and apply them to whatever the thing is you want to do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So we can think about these pre-production. Is the planning part of it right? Planning is and I can't remember where I heard this, but it's always stuck with me, planning is essential to being effective. It's a key to being effective. You're never going to be effective long-term without planning. So pre-production, is that planning, getting ready, making sure you've got all your ducks in a row and dialled in. The production is the actual doing of the work or taking the action, implementing your priorities, is that right?

Shane Borza
Yes, exactly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And then post-production is. The finishing touches, the promotion, the marketing, getting that work out to the world or getting in front of those people that you intend to attract.

Shane Borza
Yes, exactly. So it's like McDonald's was making hamburgers. But now, really, they're almost like in the real estate business, they're always in the best place. So soon as you get off the highway, there's a McDonald's, right? You know what? Let's just stop. They've made a science out of positioning themselves so that you will be surprised that you want that. You weren't getting up the highway thinking we really need to find a McDonald's right now, but instead you get very little slow to stop, you know, that was them having a very specific plan ahead of time. Think about how much time it would take to identify the specific locations to buy the land, to build the store like that didn't happen by accident. And they're not on the right at the end of every off-ramp by accident. They're in the same place everywhere on purpose, and that was very strategic planning done a long time ago.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, yeah, you know what, that's a really good point, I think a lot of people don't think about like I don't want to make a left off the freeway. I want to make a right.

Shane Borza
If here's the McDonald's and here's the offramp, you can literally do this. You don't want to be over here because you got to fight for traffic or you get to get across the line or anything. You're like, never, never mind. Let's just.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, yeah. Forget it. We'll go to the next place on the right. I love it. This has been great conversation Shane. You've shared some awesome stuff with us. Any last-minute thoughts you want to leave us with today?

Shane Borza
Well, I'd love to invite all your listeners to check out, I have two different versions of my content creator course, the live course starts again in September I hold it quarterly. It's a month-long live class. We have two hours of class once a week. There's lots of Q&A and discussion time. Everyone gets a buddy to help them go through the course and they get the entire kind of DIY class on demand for life. They get a copy of my new book and I have a coupon code where they can save a thousand dollars off the class. And that is Tim one thousand, Tim one zero zero zero. But I also have a kind of DIY on demand version. So there's no live class. It's just you get all the materials, which is five hours of video, five hours of audio notes, book, all that stuff. You can just go through it on your own pace whenever you like, and you can save five hundred dollars off that using code. Tim Five hundred. So Tim five zero zero. There's more information on my website. Shane Borza dot com or if you have any questions about anything that I talked about, or if you need help figuring out how to tell your story or how to find your voice. I love working with people and that type of stuff, so please reach out any time.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. And at Shane Borza dot com, is there a quick link there for your content creator coursre? Or is there another link they should go to for that?

Shane Borza
So just go to Shane Borza dot com, click on coaching and all the offers are in the coaching tab.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, Shane Borza dot com in coaching. So if you guys have interest in Shane's content creator course, please head on over there and check it out. Go to Shane Borza dot com and click on the coaching link and navigation and you can get all the details there. Shane, thank you so much for taking the time man. I really do appreciate it. And for those watching live or listening, thank you for doing so. Again, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. If you want to gain clarity on where to focus your marketing efforts right now, hop on over to our website at Rialto Marketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O marketing dot com. Click on the get a free consultation button. Happy to chat with you and guarantee you'll walk away with some clarity on what your priorities should be to get the best return on your marketing dollars right now. Thanks so much. Till next time. Take care.


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About the Author Tim Fitzpatrick

Tim Fitzpatrick is the President of Rialto Marketing. At Rialto Marketing, we help service businesses simplify marketing so they can grow with less stress. We do this by creating and implementing a plan to communicate the right message to the right people. Marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the RIGHT plan.

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