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How To Leverage Your Time And Increase Revenue With High-Ticket Group Coaching And Mastermind Programs

How To Leverage Your Time And Increase Revenue With High-Ticket Group Coaching And Mastermind Programs

Have you thought about offering high-ticket group coaching or mastermind programs in your business? They can be a tremendous way to leverage your time and increase revenue. We've got Chris Williams from Group Coach Nation with us today. He is going to dig into this and a whole lot more.

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How To Leverage Your Time And Increase Revenue With High-Ticket Group Coaching And Mastermind Programs



Tim Fitzpatrick
Have you thought about offering a high ticket, group coaching or mastermind program in your business? It can be a tremendous way to leverage your time and increase revenue. Our special guest today is going to dig into all of this and a whole lot more. You do not want to miss this. I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. I am super excited to have Chris Williams from Group Coach Nation with me. Chris, welcome, man.

Chris Williams
Tim, super stoked to be here. You and all your piece. Man, this is super fun. Thanks for having me on.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I'm looking forward to digging into this. Having a podcast is like free consulting, so I know you're going to help me help a bunch of other people as well, but before we dig into that, I want to ask you some rapid-fire questions just to help us get to know you a little bit. You good to go?

Chris Williams
I'm ready, man. Let's rock and roll.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Let's do it. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Chris Williams
Skateboarding and trail running. I'm an ultramarathoner.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, damn. Most ultras are what, 75 plus miles?

Chris Williams
So technically, when you go 50K, 31.2 miles is when it rolls into ultra territory. If you ran a marathon last weekend and you ran back to your car in the parking garage, it was more than a marathon. Let's say it's an ultra marathon.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, got it. Cool. What's your hidden talent?

Chris Williams
Oh, it's juggling and riding a unicycle at the same time.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I've never had that one. That's good. That's good.

Chris Williams
It's funny by listening, and I have no idea who's going to ask. So this is really fun.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Chris Williams
If you don't have a way to predictably generate on profile leads, you're just getting lucky.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's a very good one. What's one thing about you that surprises people.

Chris Williams
Oh, wow, that's good. I think it's that I don't own a car.

Tim Fitzpatrick
How do you get around?

Chris Williams
I have an electric bike, an electric skateboard, and a regular pedal bike. I've done this for about three years of the past ten years kind of off and on. Right now, I'm currently about two years into not having a car, and I freaking love it. I keep going on to Tesla's app and like, okay, I'm going to click it and I'm like, "No, I don't want the hassle yet."

Tim Fitzpatrick
Do you keep having answers that I've never heard before? This is great.

Chris Williams
I'm a tree hugger. I don't know.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. So what does success mean to you?

Chris Williams
It's time. Absolutely time. I want time. I got kids. I got family. Man, I got good community. Once you figure out how to make money, it doesn't take a lot of money to be happy. Once you figure out how to make it, you're good. It's just time.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You know, I'm trying to remember where I saw the statistic, but there's a statistic out there that says once you make over $75,000 a year.

Chris Williams
You don't get any happier.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, you don't get any happier. And when I saw that, that always stuck with me because I think as entrepreneurs, a lot of us are driven by money, but money can allow you to do certain things. But it certainly doesn't bring happiness. Which leads me to my next question, which is, where is your happy place?

Chris Williams
Outside. It's the sky. It's always outside. I have one tattoo on me, Tim, and I don't tell many people. This is fine. You got good questions. Inside of my left bicep, which I'm wearing a flannel. It's huge, by the way. I'm just saying, I'm a massive guy. Obviously super skinny. I'm a trail runner, right? It's the word free. F-R-E-E. All right. And the last e is sky blue. I got that tattoo and I was three years post suicidal tendencies several years ago, and it has always been that clear, just blue sky. I got to go outside and see it every day.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Dude, I love it. And it's funny you say I'm not huge. I'm an ultra marathoner. Yeah, I've never seen, like, a totally buffed ultra marathon.

Chris Williams
I wish I could have both, but it doesn't seem to work.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You can have to cut back on the miles if you want that. What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Chris Williams
Yes, they need to be kind. Absolutely. First of all, I love hanging out with kind people. And next is humble slash teachable. I like being someone who learns constantly. I like hanging out with people who know they don't know what's going on, and they're constantly like, "I want to know more about that." Those people are interesting people to hang out with. So to me, it's kind and people who are still in the learning mode of life.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Thank you for sharing. I now know you much better than I did when we first started our conversation.

Chris Williams
Those are super good questions, Tim.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So tell us more about what you're doing with Group Coach Nation. Who are you working with? What kind of programs are you offering?

Chris Williams
Yeah. So business or entrepreneurial experts, coaches, speakers, authors, people who help people make money or time. That's who we work with. And we help those people build high ticket coaching offers. But particularly down that group coaching or like building your own high ticket mastermind. Like all the experts we know out there have a high ticket mastermind. They're extremely profitable. But here's the more important thing. They're a really great way to transform people's lives. E courses, books, podcasts like you and I both have, those help people kind of get an idea of what's going on, but they don't change a life. And when we get to hang out with the people in our communities, in a really intimate setting with 5, 10, 15, 20 other people who are going down that same path that are kind and teachable, lives change rapidly. And that's like super cool to me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where do you draw the line at high ticket, like dollar-wise?

Chris Williams
Yeah. That's a really good and moving target kind of question.,Right? So we all have a price point if I say, "Well, it's $100,000, Tim." For some listeners right now, they're going to say, "Oh, that's nothing." Some are going to say, "Oh, my gosh, that's too expensive." Okay. If you say 5000, you get the same response. So typically anything north here in the US or kind of Western Europe. All right. Anything over 5000 US pounds, whatever is really going to get you in that space where you're out of the E courses and out of that whole zone and into some definite time with the coach consultant. All right. If you're charging less than that and you're giving your time in a group or one on one, let's just call it a day. That's the truth. Once you get over that 5K Mark, your time gets off. And people typically want to get on some sort of a call to get to know you or somebody else on your team before they make a purchasing decision. It's hard to sell it straight off of a funnel. So there's lots of little triggers like that that make that $5,000 mark kind of the magic spot where else and it starts getting a little more involved. The cool thing, though, is it takes just as much work to close a five or ten or $20,000 deal as it does to close a $500 deal. And the cool thing about that, too, is that people who pay five or ten or $20,000 change and grow and take your advice better than people who pay $500. So it works better for everybody.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I want to make sure people don't miss this. What you just said about it taking just as much work to sell high ticket and as low ticket is absolutely spot on. Do not make that mistake, people. If you take away just that one thing from this conversation, it is worth listening to the entire conversation. That's huge. I want to follow up on one thing before we start digging into some of the nitty-gritty here. How do you define group coaching versus mastermind programs? What's the difference?

Chris Williams
Yes, there is a difference. Okay, so let's lay this out in this linear continuum here. Okay. So if you're watching along, see my hands out here. If you're listening, I'm going to go like left to right here. Okay. So over here on the far left hand side, we have the really basic stuff. All right. And that's the E courses, downloading a free book, plus shipping watching all of my YouTube videos or something like that, right? You're going to learn a lot, but you're probably not going to change a lot. Okay. Even if you pay $1,500 for an E course, same game, just an expensive YouTube channel. Sorry, I know I have an Ecourse, too. I get it. We're all disappointed here. I still say about our Ecourse, but that's the truth of it, folks. Then we're down here in the other far extreme, and we're going to pay somebody a million dollars to come sit in our business for a week and help us change everything. Okay. That's high end one-on-one consulting. Somewhere in the middle is a collection of us getting together and sharing ideas and all pursuing the same goal with the same intent, supporting each other, keep each other accountable, and moving forward rapidly. You can't get that rapid movement in a million-dollar one-on-one coaching session for a week that you can get in a group. You also can't get even though maybe 100 other people are watching YouTube videos or the ebook with you right then, you can't get that movement without the involvement of the coach. So the group and the coach putting themselves in the same place as the magic spot. Now, if you want to call that a mastermind, it typically means that it's being led by an expert who's carefully selected the people that are in that expert's group, and they're going to conquer these problems together. A little bit of a weaker model is the group coaching model, which is a little bit more like anybody's welcome. We let 80 or 100 people in there at a time. And yeah, I'm going to show up live every week and teach and coach. But you're not going to get as much of my time and you're not going to really get the same sense of connection that you would with 15 or 20 people. They're all in the same direction. That kind of makes some sense there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. It seems like the way I always think about it and correct me if I'm wrong. But the way I think about coaching is typically in a group setting. Typically, group coaching is pretty structured and they're going through a very specific curriculum. When I think of masterminds, there can still be curriculum within a mastermind, but it typically tends to be like we're going to go through some curriculum and then we're all going to talk about this as a smaller group. Like, you don't get in a mastermind, and there are 50 people in a mastermind. It is a much smaller group, and depending on the mastermind, it depends on how small it is. But that's how I kind of think of it. Am I?

Chris Williams
Yeah. You're absolutely right. Yes. And I run two masterminds at a time, and mine are both that way because, Tim, I got into leading a mastermind. Can I just kind of tell the back story of this for a second? Do we have time for that?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Absolutely.

Chris Williams
So there's this little company called Click Funnels and they do this cool online funnel building thing, right? Some of you might have heard about them, so I don't know how to build a funnel. All right. I'm not a funnel builder. We all have funnels of some sort in your life. If you have any kind of marketing channel, it is a funnel. All right. Even if it's not that brand, it brings people in and helps them make a decision. Right. So I went to a click funnels conference one time because one of my team members was tinkering with the ClickFunnels tools. Like, you got to go check this thing out. It was in Nashville, down street from where I live just a couple of hours away when I checked it out. Cool deal. Over the course of a few months, I got to know some of the people in that community. Ultimately, I joined Russell Brunson's High Ticket private mastermind. Never built a funnel in my life. And I joined the dude's Mastermind. Got in that group where we were actually sitting down with Russell in Boise, Idaho. And I thought, this is my first entry into Masterminds. I just kind of went big one for it. I thought, you know, I'm going to learn so much from this expert. It's going to change my life. Within about 30 minutes of being in the room with 50 or 60 people, period, I realized, "Oh, my gosh, it's the people in this room. They're going to change my life." And at that moment, I was trying to break the code, and I launched five e-courses spent, I don't know, $100,000 or so on ads, trying to make these things work over the course of a couple of years, and I couldn't do it. And I explained it to them, and they were all like, "Oh, cool. Chris, How's your mastermind going?" And I was like, "Mastermind? I don't have one. I'm here with you guys." Like, "No, How's yours? The one you're teaching." I was like, "I don't have one" like, "Oh, you have to have a mastermind before you can have an e-course." I was like, "Nobody told me that. I took the e-courses about e-courses." And ultimately, I realized, okay, I need to be selling my information to a group of we left 15 people at a time per group into our mastermind, because I want to be able to see everybody and help everybody. I need to be able to sell that change people's lives and then record that content and sell the recordings of what's actually working. And I can reuse the pattern of people who actually purchased at a higher price point. It's the same pattern that people will use purchasing at a lower price point. All of that works. You just got to start by getting paid to build. And when you get paid to build, the reason that's so important is not just because you make money, it's because when somebody pays you, you can learn why they paid you. And that's actually what your marketing needs to talk about. And that's actually what your product, your curriculum, your transformation model, whatever needs to be based on. I'm swiping my credit card because I believe you can do XYZ. Okay, well, I'm going to make sure I include X-Y-Z in weeks seven, eight and nine, you know?

Tim Fitzpatrick
So they're paying for the transformation. So I want to make sure I got this right. So you touched on a little bit about the scale and profit differences between one on one coaching masterminds and online courses. With online courses they're learning but they're really not going to have that much change. With one on one coaching, certainly, we can create a lot of great change, but it's not super scalable, whereas when we get into Masterminds, we kind of get the beauty of both. We can create a lot of change, but we're leveraging our time so that we can help more people at any given one time.

Chris Williams
Absolutely right. And the people in a group setting will learn change their businesses grow faster. Every now and then, the past several years since I've been running Masterminds, every now and then, I'll let somebody into a one-on-one coaching scenario. They'll want to buy three or four sessions of just like, "Hey, can we talk about some stuff?" I think I've done that twice in the past three years. I've always walked away from those sessions feeling like that wasn't the right thing for the client. They got way more of my time than anybody else, but they honestly didn't change as much as they would have if they had done it in a group. So we've stopped. We just simply don't do it anymore. I think it's the wrong thing for the client.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So at this point, you're doing all masterminds?

Chris Williams
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Two at a time. Some masterminds are ongoing. They never stop. Others, it's a set period of time. How are yours structured?

Chris Williams
Yeah. It's a great question. It goes back to the value you asked me about earlier. What's the thing that's highest value to me.?It's time. For me, I don't have this never-ending ascension model and ongoing trying to keep people looped into our process. I teach experts how to build high-ticket masterminds. We're really good at that. It happens fast and they get the thing they want. I don't want to teach them how to hang out with Chris for the next ten years. I got kids I want to hang out with and they need to go find the next expert that's going to teach them the next thing in their stage. So we start and stop. We get it done.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. Okay. I want to talk about getting started. You have a four step method for prospecting and selling people into a high ticket mastermind. I'd like to dig into that because I think that is the biggest hurdle most people face when they think about groups they're like, "Oh, my God. How am I going to get enough people to make this group worthwhile?" So I want to try and break down that barrier.

Chris Williams
This is really great. Tim, I'm really glad we're bringing this up, because we can all get a one-on-one done for you or one-on-one coaching client. But you think, "Oh, if I enrolled ten new clients last year." Let's say they were all half million dollar clients. They're great. High ticket clients. Awesome. You had a nice big year, but it's still ten clients. And if you're going to start a big, high ticket group coaching program, I got to roll ten freaking clients in the next six weeks. How am I going to do that? Okay, so here's the steps. First up, it's organic outreach. Okay, we have to pretend. Pretend you're moving into the neighborhood. You're new. You just bought the house, get it all decorated. Finally got the bushes trimmed. The neighbors are all like, walking about their dogs, saying, "It's so great to have you all here. This looks better than the people before. You all done a great job." Okay, that's you. You got your house, you're there. You're new in this space. You're going to offer some online training. You're going to offer group coaching or a mastermind process. That's going to be your house. But you got to do the first thing first. When you get moved into a neighborhood, you've got to go out and you've got to make new friends. You got to do it organically. You might have a few neighbors dropping off some brownies. Tim lives in Colorado. So those brownies might be really good brownies.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Not mine, but some people.

Chris Williams
So they might come see you. But more than not, we have to be a little bit brave and go out there and be like, "You know, I'm going to go out this Saturday. I'm just going to every Saturday, make an effort to keep an eye on who's out in the front yard and actually go introduce myself. Hey, I'm new here. It's so great to meet you. Tell me a little about you, a little about me." And get to know people that's organic outreach do that on whatever social media platform you like. But get out there and search for people that are in the same neighborhood you're in. They're interested in. They're doing the stuff they're talking about, the things that you're talking about at your place, whatever your brand your mastermind is. Get to know people don't overthink it. Don't make it weird. Don't invite them to a funnel. Don't drop a link. Just super simple. "Hey, noticed you're into digital marketing. Me too, man. Took a look at your website. Super cool. Love what you're doing. All the best." You do that they will reply back with, "Oh, thanks for reaching out. Look at your website, too. Cool. Hey, who do you serve?" They'll ask you to start a conversation. That's number one.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So is that organic outreach really about it's not necessarily, are you reaching out to people that could be potential prospects or people that are more referral partner-based or both?

Chris Williams
Yes, I am a both kind of person. And I think that's a really important strategy piece you mentioned right there, Tim. I'm looking to reach out to people who are my ideal prospect and who probably influence my ideal prospect. Makes sense?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Chris Williams
Okay. Yeah. Because then either way, if I build a good relationship with this person, if the person buys from me, great. If the person doesn't and just talks about me in a positive light in the future, I win either way.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Chris Williams
Great clarity there. Thanks.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So organic outreach.

Chris Williams
That's number one. Yeah. Absolutely. Number two is you have to have some sort of platform where you can interact with the people that you start getting to know. So let's go back to our neighborhood analogy. You got a front yard, you got a back deck, you got a pool, you got a house, whatever you got, you need to have a little bit of a house party going on occasionally. All right. But that doesn't just mean okay. So I'm going to build a website or is it a podcast or is it something on clubhouse or Facebook or wherever it is. It means that you have to have them in a space, let's define this space, where you can actually be seen as the host. So you're in charge of the party and be able to communicate with them on an individual basis. So let's use Facebook groups as an example. Are they going to be metagroups? What are they going to be called someday?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I don't know.

Chris Williams
So groups on Facebook or LinkedIn is getting kind of into the group model. Linkedin's groups currently is a little bit weak, but let's talk about that model. That gives you a space to have a house. Now you can go live in your groups or drop a video or content, and you can talk to everybody just like you would at your house party, "Hey, guys, listen up. We're about to get dinner started. Plates over here. Wines over here. You'll have fun. Plenty of seating out back." It's a group announcement. Or you can work the party and go around and say, "I'm so glad you're here. Tell me more about you. What's going on with your family?" Blah, blah, blah. You need to have a place where you can make public conversation and private conversation happen. Facebook groups are really good at that. If you love or hate Facebook, that's not the point I'm trying to make. I'm just saying that model that Facebook has built is very effective. So step number one, I'm out there hanging out with people in the community. Step number two, I'm inviting people to a place that I call my own home where I can make public and private conversation happen.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So groups of some kind, if I'm understanding what you're saying here, having a podcast, it does help you build that relationship, potentially if you invite those people on, but you don't really get that group interaction. Am I getting that right?

Chris Williams
Yeah, that's true. And Tim, if we're speaking to "Hey, audience speaking to all you guys and girls out there right now and having fun. But the truth of it is, it's hard for us for Tim and I to tomorrow, sit down and answer your question one on one via the podcast platform. We're launching the podcast in another social platform at the same time where a conversation can happen." Now we're on to something. But you got to monitor those platforms, right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
So it's got to be some type of group that you control.

Chris Williams
The thing about Facebook groups is it gets that group feeling. You got people buzzing and talking about the same exciting thing. Like, you got a new house. You're in the neighborhood. You're like, "Oh, my gosh. We want to see your house. It's so beautiful. Let me take four or five of you on a quick tour." And you walk around the house, and then all of a sudden you have five people. You know how it is. "Love that, Chandelier. Oh, look at this. Isn't that amazing?" That's the group thing happening. And that happens in a group setting when you're talking business as well.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Got it.

Chris Williams
It's human nature.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So it sounds like your preferred way to do this is Facebook groups right now.

Chris Williams
I think we tried everything. We try everything every quarter. Every quarter, my team and I reengage in all platforms possible so that we can crack the code and teach our people and our community how to do it. And every quarter so far, Facebook groups by far by the numbers, when bringing more leads, they crush it. Linkedin groups as of today, can I say what date it is? Can I date this episode? Yeah, it is December 7, 2021. Okay, as of today, LinkedIn groups are starting to try, but they're just so far behind when it comes to the functionality and the experience of a group, it's kind of rigid and stiff. Facebook is very natural. So, yes, at this point, I don't have a preference about which platform is better, but the group model Facebook has built is better.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So organic outreach. I'm connecting with people. I'm networking for lack of a better term. I'm not selling, but I'm assuming as part of those conversations, at some point you are then bringing up, "Hey, got a Facebook group over here. Here's what we talk about. If that's something you might be interested in, we'd love to have you join."

Chris Williams
Absolutely. That's step number three. And here's how it works. Let's go back to our house party analogy. I've made some organic outreach neighborhood. We're having a house party role and they're hanging out. They're talking about the chandelier and whatever else we do the house tour, and they're like, "Wow, look at that dining room table. I love that." And they're like, "Oh, my gosh. The woodwork on that base is so amazing." And I casually say, "Yeah, I got into woodworking several years ago. I have a shop out back. I actually made that, like, three years ago with one of our kids." "No way can we see the shop?" Okay. At that point, there's going to be a collection of people in the house, some who are like, "Nah, I don't want to see the woodworking shop." Two or three of them are going to follow me out to the shop, and they're going to be huge fans of the tools and the techniques and how it all works. Now, that's how this group thing works also, from a marketing standpoint. I've done the organic outreach. They're at the party. They're just hanging out in our groups. And now we're talking about specifics and people are like, "I like that. I want to know more about that." That's step number three, step number four is just a short little step over a line. And it's, "Hey, this Saturday, I got four or 5 hours in the shop. You folks are welcome to come over and I'll show you how to build a table leg. Let's just start there." And all of a sudden, you got a class. Same with the mastermind. It's, "Hey, you just raised your hand and said, you want to know more about this? Let's just jump on a call and talk it out. If I can help you move forward with some quick tips on a call, I will. If you want to get serious and dive in the deep end, we'll see if we can work that out, too."

Tim Fitzpatrick
So three is putting out specific content in the group about your expertise.

Chris Williams
Yeah. Three is of all the pieces. Three is the I would say, honestly, the most skilled from a listening standpoint, it's really not as much about what content I'm dropping into our communities. It's more about us listening to the communities. And listening, we literally read every comment private or public on every platform we're on. And we literally reply to every single one because those comments are people saying, "Hey, thanks. Love this episode." If they just say that, then it's easy to say, "Wow, that episode we talked about organic marketing. Super glad you found it valuable. You want to jump on a call with one of our team members who's really good organic marketing and talk it out? We'd love to help." Boom.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. So you're listening. By listening, you then can respond. And in step four, you're responding and you're asking them to take that next step.

Chris Williams
Yes. Let me clearly define a difference between this and other types of social media marketing, even organic. Let's just keep using Facebook groups, for example. We're all in Facebook groups, and they have 20,000 people in. That's not bad. 20,000 or 20. It's the same. Okay. But we're all in groups and they're like, "Hey, who wants the top ten things I do every Monday to crush it on Tuesday. Hashtag Tuesday, crush it below to get the free down." Right. Okay. And you get all these comments come pouring in. That is a way to create a piece of content and know who's interested. Okay. It's the same thing. It's just a little bit of a lower ticket model and a little bit more of an aggressive sales pattern model. Not knocking it, it's just different. The model because we only teach people how to build and lead high ticket, very high touch transformational groups. The masterminds, or our own, we teach a model that's more sophisticated and it's accomplishing the same thing. We're just watching for organic and natural conversations. It's like we're going to serve wine at the party versus standing up at a frat party and holding up a case of fireball and being like, "Fireball's here. Who wants something?" I'm going to get comments, but it's different, right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Chris Williams
So that step three is really a skilled listening piece where if you host a community and it's meaningful and you're really reaching out there in the community and having conversations with them, they will love it. And it'll be real. And it'll let people understand this is the real deal person. And I could actually trust this person with a significant transformation in my business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
In step three, you're listening, you're paying attention to what people in the community are saying, and then you are responding. But you're looking for potential signs that you may be able to help them, and when you see that you're responding, but then you're offering that next step, it's like, "Hey, if you'd be interested in having a quick conversation, I think we could give you some more helpful information on this." Whatever it may be.

Chris Williams
Yup. Let's talk about it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And it's in that conversation in step four that you're then talking about, "Hey, if you found this helpful, I think you might really get a lot of value from our next mastermind. Here's what we're doing." Is that kind of how this is going?

Chris Williams
Exactly. Step three is listening and pivoting to a call if that's appropriate. Step four is the conversation. Can I break that one down a little bit?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Chris Williams
Okay. So in that conversation, there are three things I'm trying to accomplish. Number one, let's just list them all out and I'll break them down. I either want to introduce this person to someone else in our community. They got a thing they're trying to crack the code on. If I know someone else in our community is an expert in that, I'm going to say, "Hey, you need to talk to so and so. They're awesome." Number two, if we can sit there for 30 minutes and help figure out and give them down the road. Let's just do it. "How can I help you move forward? Great." And number three, I am very intentionally wondering, is this somebody I would actually want to fill one of the 15 spots in one of my upcoming groups. Now, that's a big deal, because if you do this right, you're not going to have any trouble filling up your spots in your groups. We're booked out. That's a good thing. And anybody who does this right will be booked out. The real issue is I need to make sure this is the person who's the right fit. If I charge this person money, will they win? The worst thing that can happen is they don't. Like, I want them to win. So I'm looking for key characteristics of mastermind members. For me, I want to know, number one, are they natural givers? Are they people who give by their nature? Because in a mastermind, they got to be willing to support other people that are supporting them like, it's a community. Number two, I only work with experts. I don't teach anyone in my mastermind how to be the expert they are. They got to show up with, like, I know how to do what I do. I want to teach people cool.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Chris Williams
And number three, they have to be really natural, community oriented leaders. Are they okay on a microphone and a camera? Do they know how to actually what I want to co host or be on a podcast with them? You're a great example of that. You're an awesome leader, obviously. That's important because I'm teaching people how to lead a high-ticket mastermind community. So those are the things that are kind of needed as the foundation pieces for me to help for anybody else listening or watching. And you got to define the person you want to help. What kind of native things do they need to show up with native skill sets they need to already be locked in on before you can help them take the next step? Shortlist, look for those things. And those are the people you make invitations to.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, got it. I love it. That is a super dialed in process. That kind of leads into my next question, which is based on this process, you're always prospecting and selling always, right? Because you're always paying attention to what's going on in the group. You're interacting with the group. You're posting information in the group. You're then always selling to find people. How far out are you scheduling your programs? So you talk to somebody and you're like, "Hey, yeah." They're like, "Oh, my gosh, Chris, I'm totally interested. I want to be in the next program." Are they having to wait a month, two months, or is it two weeks? What does that look like?

Chris Williams
Typically, we try to keep it inside of two months, so there's a fine line there. Right? Too long is like, look, I got to make a move in my business,

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right. Yeah. I can't just sit here and do nothing.

Chris Williams
In two years, we're going to really be able to help you. So it's got to be soon enough. But the practicality of it is once you kind of get a couple of mastermind groups behind you and you do a good job at it, they kind of start filling up on their own. I think it's actually 53% of our seats are full on all of our groups before we ever announce that there's a group opening up because we already have people wanting to get in. And so then we announce the groups opening up, and we try to give people six to eight weeks of lead time to make sure that they're ready for it. We can interview them. We can get a little prep material done. We want people to win, right? Anything under that is fine. Like, if you're like, hey, you're starting your first group, let's say and you might have a group starting next week. Fine. A lot of people when you talk to them, I'd say most people that I talk to or any of our coaches talk to in our program, they're like, they're on the call because they want to do something and now is fine. So if you got opening spaces and you can get people in, get them in there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. How long is your program?

Chris Williams
So we have two masterminds. By the way, this is not meant to be plug time for what we do, but if you can see how it works, groupcoachnation dot com. Groupcoachnation dot com. We have a beginner, advanced and pro level. You can sort out where you are. Our advanced group beginner group is like, we're going to help you get traction. You got to get some leads. You got to close some deals. You don't have to be fully engaged in a big mastermind to sort that out. It's not hard.

Chris Williams
All right. Our advanced group is where the masterminds that I teach really start. That advanced group is eight weeks long, and we're going to get your first mastermind sold and up and running in six to eight weeks. And we want to be with you once you get that done, yay, you. You made money. It's successful. But we want you to kind of hang around and keep reengaging in that community for the first two or three launches you go through. And that way you can get efficiency and figure out the business model. The pro group is for people who are making 50K a month or more in just their mastermind sales process. And they've got a couple of team members now helping them with their masterminds. Like, they got a sustainable business model they're building. And we really don't talk a lot about masterminds in there as much as we talk about, like, here's how Group Coach Nation runs. And let's show you my team and I interact with you. We let one of your own team members, come in and interact with my support team. Like, let us show you how to make this business work long term.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. Got it.

Chris Williams
And that's a longer term, six to twelve month long process where they're in our community and they're really close with us.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Got it. I love it. Chris, this has been fantastic. You've dropped some serious bombs. Is there anything else that you want to any last minute thoughts you want to leave us with today?

Chris Williams
Yeah. I think the most important piece of this is number one, I say the most important. I'm going to say two things, but number one, first, most important is owning who you are as an expert. You got this. People need what you got. You might think there are other experts out there that are bigger and better than you in the community, but ultimately, everybody, you got this. Share your information and get paid to do it. That's number one. Number two, is like lean in and ask questions because it comes down to my favorite quote, the best piece of advice you asked me early on. If you don't have a way to predictably, generate on profile leads, you don't have a business. You're just getting lucky. And we got to show you how to get lots of leads, how to get the neighborhood attracted to your house party. So you can actually start a group quickly. That's the jumping off place.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it, man. And you touched on this Group Coach Nation is where they can go to learn more. If you've even had an inkling to do this, reach out to Chris. He obviously knows what the hell he's doing. Can help you get to where you want to be faster, which is super important. So go to groupcoachnation dot com. Reach out to Chris. Chris, thank you so much for taking the time, and I really appreciate it. And thank you for those who are watching listening. Again, I am Tim with Rialto Marketing. If you are struggling with your marketing, you're not sure what that next right step is to get to where you want to go. Hop on over to our website, Rialto Marketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing dot com. Click on the Get a Free Consultation button. I would be happy to chat with you and give you some clarity on what those steps should be.

Chris Williams
Fantastic. One thing right there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Absolutely, man.

Chris Williams
Folks, you're leaning in on Tim right now. Here's the truth of it. When I'm listening to a podcast, a couple of episodes in I have to be honest with myself. I like this person. If you want help with that marketing strategy, for real Tim is the real deal. Tim is not paying me to say this. We don't have a Commission split process here. You've identified him as a trustworthy person. If you can get 15 minutes of his time or his team's time, lucky you. It's worth it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I appreciate it. Chris, I appreciate you being here with me. It was great to meet you. I look forward to continuing this conversation. And thank you guys so much. Until next time. Take care.


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About the Author Tim Fitzpatrick

Tim Fitzpatrick is the President of Rialto Marketing. At Rialto Marketing, we see many businesses battling information overload with marketing. As a result, they aren't sure what their next marketing steps should be to get where they want to go. We help B2B service-based businesses create, implement, and manage a marketing plan to communicate the right message to the right people so they build results that last. Marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the RIGHT plan.

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