How To Overcome Common Podcasting Challenges & Build Your Audience

August

26

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When done correctly, your podcast can give you authority in the marketplace and position you as an expert in your field. Not only is it a valuable tool to increase your brand awareness, but it’s an excellent way to connect with your audience and stay top of mind. I’ve got a podcasting expert, Adam Adams from Grow Your Show with me today. He is going to break down how to overcome common podcasting challenges and how to build your audience.

Join Adam Adams and Tim Fitzpatrick for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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How To Overcome Common Podcasting Challenges & Build Your Audience



Tim Fitzpatrick
When done correctly, your podcast can give you authority in the marketplace and position you as an expert in your field. Not only is it a valuable tool to increase brand awareness, but it's an excellent way to connect with your audience and stay top of mind. I've got a podcasting expert with me today. He's going to break down how to overcome a lot of the common podcasting challenges and how to build your audience. Hi. I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. Thanks so much for taking the time to tune in. Here at Rialto Marketing, we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult, but if you want to accelerate revenue growth, you've got to remove your revenue roadblocks. Then we can certainly help with that. I am super excited to have with me today Adam Adams from Grow Your Show. Adam, thanks for being here, man. I appreciate it.

Adam Adams
Yeah, I'm stoked. Tim. Thanks for having me on the show, and I'm excited to have you on ours as well.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, we're doing back to back days of recording here, so I'm excited to switch sides of the mic tomorrow. So before we dig into this, obviously, I love podcasting. I think there's so many advantages and benefits to doing it. I can't wait for you to share your expertise. Before we do that, though, I want to ask you some rapid fire questions to help us get to know you. You good to jump in with both feet here?

Adam Adams
Let's do it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
All right, man. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Adam Adams
I like mountain biking and Jeeping. Those are my favorite two things.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, awesome. When we get off there, we need to talk about mountain biking. A couple of my buddies growing up huge into Jeeping, so you and I can have some great conversations. What's your hidden talent?

Adam Adams
I have some weird hidden talents. I'll just say I can walk on my hands pretty well for somebody who is never really a professional gymnast. I'm almost as good on my hands as I am on my feet.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Oh, man. Okay. That's an awesome hidden talent. What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Adam Adams
Very much. Very much is persistence and determination. Really? School teacher, my band director, made us memorize a bunch of quotes, and lots of the quotes had persistence and determination. One of them was by Calvin Coolidge, and it basically said, it doesn't matter, like, how smart you are or how much schooling you've taken. Really, the things that make somebody successful is that they never quit. And they say persistence and determination are omnipotent. They have endless potential. And even back then, I just encompassed that. And it's done a lot for me in my life. And I want to expand on it a few more seconds. Because I think most people dabble. They try. They test. And when it doesn't work immediately they throw up their hands. And they even become the type of skeptic that tells other people that the thing doesn't work.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right.

Adam Adams
Real estate investing doesn't work. Facebook ads don't work because they tried it, they never learned about it, and it didn't work for two weeks, for three weeks, for three months. But really, when you want to get good at something, when you really want to be successful with your new business, with your new podcast, it takes relentless persistence.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. That quote from Calvin Coolidge is one of my favorites, so thank you for sharing it. What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Adam Adams
I would have to say that I was born into a plural marriage, polygamy family, and so I have like 20 brothers and sisters, and that surprises most people and generally speaking gets people to ask lots and lots of questions. Half of them I don't know very well because we left when I was like three or four.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So do you live that way now or?

Adam Adams
I do not. No, I don't. My mother left when I was like three or four, and I ended up growing up with her and my stepdad in a monogamous relationship. They're still married today. So no, I don't live that way. I'm not part of that church. But I have recently started to learn to love and respect and appreciate that part of my family, even though there are some differences. And I actually just last week, or maybe it's been two weeks now, went to a family reunion and was able to meet like, five of the eleven brothers and three of the nine sisters.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Oh, wow.

Adam Adams
I'm working toward opening myself up to more family type relationship, but to answer your question, I don't live a plural marriage life.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What does success mean to you?

Adam Adams
Man, this is like the toughest one. And I feel honestly like when somebody asked me, what does success mean? I always change my answer. I guess it's just however I feel that day. But ultimately, if you are successful, I think you love what you do. I think you're content with what you do. You might want more, you might be striving for more, but you are content with what you have. And I think a big part of what I think of success that people miss is that they have the financial success only, but maybe they're a jerk to their kids or their spouse or whatever it is. I think a lot of people forget about what they really, truly want for this money that helps them feel good enough, and ultimately they're losing side of it. And so for me, it's not that it's balance, but it's being happy and content and doing what you truly want to be doing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Adam Adams
Yeah, that's a tough one. I love being in the mountains. I love being on a river, river rafting. I like being with my kids. So I'm going to say my happy place is a hug from my son.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What qualities do you value and the people you spend time with?

Adam Adams
Authenticity, integrity, honesty, open mindedness, those would probably be the four.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Thanks for sharing, Adam. So tell us a little bit more about what you're doing with Grow Your Show. Who are you working with? How are you helping folks?

Adam Adams
Grow Your Show is a podcast agency, so our main goal is to support podcasters to be their easy button. Our main clients, our most common clients, they make really good money in their company. They've been doing it for a long time. And they are the type of person that wants to stay in their lane and offload the hard stuff. So it could just be the easy button for them. That's our main client. We basically do everything. I know it sounds crazy, we don't really get their guest for them or record the episode for them. They've got to either get their guests or come up with their content and push record. When that happens, we do everything else. And I'm going to miss a lot of things because we just do it all. But here's a few parts that we make sure to do. We'll download the episode from online and so then we'll edit it. We'll write the show notes. We'll create artwork that can be used for promotion. We'll email their guest for them. So we'll take the guest bio, write the show notes, will email that guest. All of this promotion materials, audiograms, video, grams, quote cards, and other promotional materials. We'll publish it all over on different audio platforms and video platforms. We write the title of it. We post it on their social so like, we do all their organic social media posting on up to three places and the list goes on and on and on. Basically, we become your whole back office. So that all you really do is press record and we handle the rest.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So your clients, they're finding the guests, they're doing the actual interview. But outside of that, you guys are handling all the other aspects of the podcast.

Adam Adams
Literally everything. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Got it. For those of you that are watching, listening that aren't familiar with this, I mean, there's a lot of moving parts with the podcast. That's not to say that it's difficult, I wouldn't say it's difficult, but there's a lot of things going on and so somebody has to do that. So the fact that you guys do that for your clients, I think is a huge benefit. And I'm of the opinion I like the fact that you leave the content itself, the guests, to the client because in my opinion, I think they're the best people for it. Right. I think there's too many podcast agencies out there that are securing guests. And what ends up happening is the people that are brought on the show, they're not really adding any value for the clients that they're serving. And we're going to get into this as we dig into this. But I love the fact, I love how you have it set up. So dude, let's just talk podcasting, man. Why should people even consider having a podcast in the first place?

Adam Adams
I think of our business strategy as having three parts to be able to influence our people and one of the big portions is thought leadership. Podcasting is a really great way for thought leadership. The whole purpose for podcasting think of all business, it's know like trust. That's how we get clients the most amount of people to know you, the highest percentage of them to like you and the highest percentage of them to trust you. This is how we are working with people, this is how we make money, it's how we serve our listener, our customer. So the podcast you're asking why would people consider doing it? It's because you need people to talk about you when you're not in the room. It's thought leadership. The purpose is you put out content, you record something one time and it's out in the airwaves. People like it, people share about it, people talk about you even when you're not in the room. So you're growing your influence by getting the most amount of people to know you. I call it the KLTI blueprint. KLTI. Know, like Trust and then Invest. This is the top of the funnel, the know part of the funnel. It builds the awareness. Get the most amount of people to know who you are so that eventually they can like you and trust you and invest with you. Buy your products, buy your service, invest in your real estate deal, whatever it is.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. There are a couple other things too that you kind of touched on that I see as benefits as well. With long form content like this especially, I'm a huge believer in if you're going to do a podcast you might as well shoot video. I know some people don't like that, but gosh, if you record the audio and the video, you get so much leverage and you can take that one piece of content and it can drive your entire content strategy, but it can also drive a lot of your other activity, your email marketing activity, your social media activity. It's not just I'm creating content, that content is feeding a lot of your other marketing efforts in your channels and if you shoot video, you can leverage it big time. The other thing that I think is huge and this touches on one of the things that I talked about, I hinted about before is man, I think that a hugely overlooked benefit of podcasting is the networking aspect of it. Which is why I don't think it is the best thing in the world for if you're outsourcing it to have that agency or that freelancer be the one that is booking your guests. I think you want to strategically choose your guests, whether they're people that could be potential clients or great people to know and network with potential referral partners. I don't think you want to just interview anybody. What are your thoughts on that?

Adam Adams
No, I think most podcasters make several mistakes when choosing who they're going to bring on their show. And one of them is just somebody who's only looking out for themselves, just total self promotion. They're not there to give content, they're not there really to give value. They're just there to promote their stuff and their business. I think a lot of people make that mistake. Another big mistake that I've seen a lot of podcasters do when bringing on a guest is that the guests themselves are not adding value to the listener. Not because they're being self promotional, but really because I'm going to use a real estate thing as an example. So there's tons of people that do these things called syndication. Their whole goal in syndication for real estate is they want passive investors. They want people to invest with the real estate deals that they close because they ran out of their own money and now they still want to do deals. The only way for them to do deals is to bring on OPM other people's money. And a lot of these podcasters that start real estate investing podcasts, unfortunately, they bring on completely the wrong guest for their purpose. And what I mean is they start asking the guest, how did you find the deal? What did you say to the broker? How did you raise the money? And so these are real estate investing topics, but the actual avatar that the person cares about, wants to serve, who is a past investor, couldn't give two craps about these three questions that we answered. They care, how do they vet an operator? How do they vet a deal? How do they know if their money is going to be safe? How do they find an operator? How do they find the right market with a tailwind instead of a headwind where the market is going to support them to make the most amount of money? How do we get them to unlock their hidden equity from their house? How do we get them to unlock some money that they didn't even know that they had through their 401K so that it could be self directed so that they can invest? These are things that the passive investor cares about. They don't care about how to operate a deal. To them, it doesn't matter. And so the podcaster is thinking, this is on the same genre. How did you raise the money? What did you say to raise the money? And they're learning how to raise money themselves. But unfortunately, the actual avatar, the actual perfect client listener that they're really looking for is not getting value because they're asking the wrong questions. They're bringing on the wrong type of person for that type of person. I recommend that they have other passive investors. Hey, how did you do your first deal? When did you become financially free from it? You know what I mean? Versus how did you find a deal? How did you raise the money? The person that you want to serve is sitting there thinking to themselves, quote, this podcast is not for me. I'm not getting anything out of this. I don't want to run my own deals. I got my business. I'm running my business already. I don't want another job. I want passive income and I want to be safe doing it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, dude, that's such an interesting point in everything with marketing, whether it's a podcast or something else, all starts with your ideal client, your ideal client persona, your buyer avatar, whatever you want to call it, it all starts there. So that's such a great point to make, because if we overlook that, our marketing is not going to work as well as it should. So here's my next question. We obviously touched on why you should start a podcast or why you should think about it. Let's say I make the decision, hey, I'm going to jump into this. What are some of the typical challenges people face after they've made that decision? I'm like, okay, I'm going to do a podcast.

Adam Adams
This could go in many directions. So I try to keep it I'll keep it as focused as possible. The biggest mistake that I ever see is people taking the advice that they keep hearing. And it's not their fault. It's just what people keep telling them. And it is ready, firing. It is just get started. It is don't overthink it. It is done is better than perfect. So I understand where the advice comes from. Sometimes it's just better to have a podcast than to not have a podcast because you're overthinking things. The issue comes because there are 2.77 million podcasts as of about six months ago, 277 million podcasts in the world. That's a lot of competition. It's not nearly as much as there is on YouTube. I think there's 60,000, so it's like 30 times bigger. But if we are thinking about how do we make things work, unfortunately for those people giving the advice of just start, don't overthink it. Ready, fire, aim. Truly, I believe that podcasting is a ready, aim, fire. Podcasting is begin with the end in mind, like Stephen Covey always mentioned. And you started to discuss a few of those things. Figure out who identify your avatar, figure out who you're serving, figure out what is my goal for it. And then you start to outline and plan for it. So it's like, just get started, I think means start focusing on it. Start figuring these things out. Not have a podcast that's crappy with bad sound quality, with no purpose. You don't know who you're going to interview or how you're going to interview. You haven't figured out any of this stuff by just having a crappy podcast. It doesn't support your business. It becomes something that I think is more of a journal or a diary because you're really the only person that listens to it. You're putting out this content, but it's not getting in front of your right people because you went, ready, fire, aim. Instead of ready, aim, fire. So the biggest thing is, the biggest challenge that I think people do is they abruptly go into something without any study. And I think when you do spend time, like with Stephen Covey, begin with the end in mind. When you do spend that time to figure out what is the plan, the purpose, what's your call to action going to be? How are you going to convert? I think that's a big thing. Another thing that I have seen a lot of people make a mistake on is this was me 100% on my first podcast, want to do the podcast quote for the right reasons. And what I mean by that is, many humans will feel bad and guilty if they sell on their podcast. If they are there to help somebody to hire them to go to the next level, it hurts their feelings because they're like, man, I wanted to start this podcast just to help, to leave a legacy, just to benefit others. And so they're kind of afraid to make money through their podcast. And because of that, they truly take money out of their pocket every month for their podcast instead of putting money in. And this is a recipe for quitting, for not being able to sustain something because you don't make that money. And so the point that I'm getting at is, if you believe in what you're doing, if your listener believes in their company, the business that they're running, and they think that they're offering value to the world, it's, in my opinion, critically important, for many reasons I might get into those in a sec here, critically important that they call the listener to act. If the listener doesn't do whatever that next step is for them, it's a pointless podcast. There's no reason to have it. If you make money, I'm trying to remember who said this, the amount of money that's basically in your bank account I'm paraphrasing here is a direct reflection of how much value you're adding to your client, your service, how well you're helping the world. For example, Jeff Bezos helping a lot of people make money, save money, not have to leave their house, buy things when they're wearing just their underwear or less. Jeff Bezos helping a lot of people, and he makes a teenious fraction of money, like less than a percent in many, many cases, of what that transaction is. But he does it for so many people that he's a multi billionaire, and he doesn't feel bad about it. He doesn't at all feel bad about it. I think for me, in my podcast. For example, if I bring on three clients next month because I have the podcast, yes, that equates to a lot of money for the company over a year's period of time, yes, I see how that could be a selfish thing for me to want to make money. But all three of those clients couldn't have done anything close to what we are doing for them for that amount of money or time. And because I believe in it. Because your listener fully believes in what they're doing for their client, they have to make money through it. It's important. And so we've got to kind of get over that. I'll just say one other thing, and it would probably be equipment. A lot of people who say, ready, fire, aim. You don't need a good mic at the beginning. The person will just record on their phone or record somewhere else, and they never get the traction because the listener, the normal listener can hear the difference between kind of like echoey hollow, like kind of you can hear my chair going, and it just sounds like, what is happening there's too much I can't and then you have just a really nice quality sound, and it's appealing. It's easy to listen to. There's not a whole bunch of distraction, and it allows the listener to stay with you for a longer period of time. So I would say for the third piece, to answer question number two on mistakes, it's that investing in some decent equipment doesn't have to be expensive. I can get you mic for $20. Doesn't have to be expensive, but it is worth going that route instead of recording on your phone or using your webcam microphone or your computer laptop microphone.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. You dropped a ton of value in there, Adam. The biggest thing that I took away from what you just shared was we've got to have a plan. It doesn't mean that it's going to be the perfect plan, but we need to put a general plan together of who we're targeting, why we're doing this, what's the end goal, and at least start to put some of these puzzle pieces together. We don't have to have the whole puzzle piece together, but, man, we got to have some type of plan, because if we don't have a plan, things just become very haphazard. That's the biggest thing I took away from what you just shared, which I think is huge, because as we talked about, there's a lot of moving pieces with the podcast, and, man, it's not rocket science, but you got to have a general understanding of what you're getting into. And I can't remember I haven't seen this statistic for a while, but it's something like only 25% of podcasts have, I think, made it past god, what is it, past episode 30 and published in the last three months. It's something like that. So if you can put a plan together, where, again, going back to your favorite, that quote you shared about persistence and determination. If you can stick with this, man, you'll be ahead of the vast majority of people. But gosh, if you don't have a plan in the beginning, odds are you're not going to be successful.

Adam Adams
If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. Yeah, you're speaking my language, man. So let's talk marketing. I want to do a show, I commit to it. I start doing it. This is not if you build it, they will come. It's not feel the dreams. We need to market our podcast. What are some of the most effective ways that you're seeing and you're using to market your podcast and your clients?

Adam Adams
There's a few things that we do that not everybody does, and they're paid marketing. One is a private message campaign. I have like an episode that really goes into this on our podcast, on podcasting about the paid marketing campaign for direct messaging, like on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Meetup.com are the three places that we go. We call it the five three five method. It's a very, very effective marketing plan if you want to trigger algorithms for a podcast. And I'm not going to be able to memorize the last five, but the first five are very important and the three are very helpful. And then I'll give you as many of the last five as possible.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's all good, man. And we'll put the link to that episode in the show notes.

Adam Adams
Perfect.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So if you can get that to me, we'll make sure people get that because I love that, because there's a lot of people that have podcasts that are not taking advantage of paid marketing. So I think this is a really good path to go down here. So this first one you're talking about is private messaging campaigns.

Adam Adams
Yes. S so there's five things that you want to do through the private message campaign. And that is number one, you want to get people to subscribe or follow the show. Number two, you want to get those people this is critically important, those people to download. Some people think that downloads by themselves are the thing that you're looking for and they want them so much that they'll pay for fake downloads from some robot. And that actually works against you in the algorithm. So you'll never really get ranked, you'll just be shadow banned. So number one, get people to follow. Number two, get those people who are following to download. Number three, get the people that have downloaded to actually listen. If it's just to download but they're not listening, it'll work against you in the algorithm. If they are listening and you have a good listen ratio, then it'll work for you in the algorithm, which basically helps to boost your ranking where people can find you easier on different platforms. The fourth thing is to get a rating and a review, a written review for your podcast. Now, this is a part that's very divisive. People will argue against me. They'll say there's nothing that shows that getting more ratings and reviews boost you in the algorithm. And if that's true, it's fine, because it still works towards social proofing. If we go back to Jeff Bezos or Amazon, and me personally, when I'm purchasing things on Amazon, what I like to do is I would never buy something that had a perfect five star rating with four people who rated it. Five stars. But I probably would buy something with a 4.5 rating where 3000 people rated it. Because I don't know if those four people just work for them. If there's mom and dad, you know, if the CEO and the marketing team, I don't know. But when it's a couple of thousand, I'm more likely to trust it. And that's the same thing with ratings and reviews. It's called social proofing. And to illustrate it, whoever's listening can go to YouTube and type in lemmings jumping off a cliff if they want to type something like that. You'll see hundreds of these little gopher looking rodents. You'll see hundreds of them, maybe even thousands, going to the edge of a cliff, and they are all scared. None of them are doing anything. But as soon as one of them jumps, even before anything happens, the rest of them are like, it must be okay, somebody else tried it, I'm going to do it too. And what I'm saying is, human beings are very much about social proofing. When other people are doing it, it's more likely that we'll do it. When other people are against it, it's less likely that we will do it. And so when you have a significant amount of people giving positive ratings and reviews for a podcast, that social proofing allows us to feel confident in listening to it. When it only has a few, we usually ignore it. So regardless if it triggers an algorithm or not, it triggers an algorithm within the other human beings. And they don't publish the exact algorithm anywhere anyway. So if they did, we would all abuse it. And the point would be, you may as well get ratings and reviews. The takeaways for it are to ask for honest ratings and reviews, not five star ratings, reviews. There's a few reasons why psychological way that works best to ask for honesty. Additionally, on top of that, you want to ask the person that you're requesting to make sure that they've listened to an episode or two and that the review that they write is about the podcast, not about you. So it shouldn't be, I'm Tim's mom, he's a great kid. You should listen to his podcast. It should not be, oh, I met Tim at a conference. What a great guy. You should listen to his podcast. None of these have anything to do with the show. And because of that, they work against you in the algorithm. The fifth thing is that the person keeps coming back. And what we've noticed is if they do all five, if they follow or subscribe, if they download and they listen, and they give social proofing, and then they come back to the show frequently we're triggering algorithms that allow the podcast to get the best amount of results. The three places that we go to, to do private message campaign I mentioned were Facebook, LinkedIn, and Meetup. Meetup.com is a place that you can search for people that are looking for the exact thing in certain parts of the world or parts of the country. There are over 255,000 meet ups in the world, not just in the US, by the way. So this is a place where you can really figure out what somebody is interested in. And you can also see how long ago that they were active in that meet up group. And then if you want, you can filter it so you only are talking about to the people that have recently been there. You can do similar things on LinkedIn and similar things through Facebook groups that you're looking for. And so those are the three places that we use. The five three and then the five, the last five is here's. A few takeaways. It needs to be short and sweet. It needs to be personal. It needs to be asked don't tell. Here are three of the last five, and I'll just brief them. If you're doing a private message campaign and you are doing it, it's not paid advertising. You're doing the grunt work yourself. So you're connecting with people. So by using these three things is going to help you. Because if you're just copying and pasting a general thing and it doesn't feel personal to the person on the other side, then they're going to immediately flag it as spam. They're going to immediately discredit you. They're not going to want to connect with you. They're going to feel like you're pitching and selling. And nobody wants to be sold. They want to buy, but they don't want to be sold and persuaded. They don't like that feeling. So making it so that it's personal so that you're reaching out to somebody. Go back to real estate if we can. Hey, I saw that you just closed on I saw that you just did your first passive investment as a passive investor. That's awesome. How did you get into it? That's really cool. I just saw that you've been doing passive investing for three years. Do you have any tips for me if I wanted to get started doing that? This is a personal thing. I saw you just did your first wholesale deal. I saw you just started your business. I saw that you just started your podcast. It's awesome. How's it going so far? Personal. Not just to copy and paste, try to blanket everybody. If you're speaking to everybody, you're talking to nobody. So just use that takeaway. The other one is ask don't tell. A lot of people they give you all the info. Here's my podcast. Listen to my podcast. Listen to this person's podcast. Here's the link. And it's overwhelming. It's overbearing. It's too much, too fast. It feels like somebody that you don't even know is asking you to marry you. And you're like, what the heck? I don't even know how to react to this. We don't have that kind of relationship right now. You can't be asking me these questions. So you want to basically lead them down. But if you're telling, if you're going up to somebody, I'm hot, you're hot, we should probably make some babies together. It's just not going to work. You're telling. But if you say, oh, nice shoes. Where did you get them? Or if you say, hey, I haven't seen you here. Do you come here often? Or just starting the conversation is a better way? And using questions is a pattern interrupt. It hooks them, it gets them thinking, and it helps them to drop their guard versus you telling them something. So the last one that I mentioned out of the three of the five was keeping it short and sweet. A lot of people do paragraphs and links and bunch of other stuff. When you do all that, it's just overwhelming. It's too much. So keep it short. I saw that you just started your business. That's really cool. What are you focused on? What does your company do or whatever? Just personal and a question, one or two sentences, three at the most. And you can pay us to do that. You can pay your own virtual assistant to do that. You can be the person who does that. This is one of the most effective ways to market a podcast, because they actually trigger algorithms to get you ranked, which means more people will see you. Other marketing things. We do Facebook ads. We do banner ads. One thing that's a very high dollar is Spotify ads. So we're not currently doing that for our clients because none of our clients are paying like $30,000 a month to us. But Spotify ads are kind of cool. They just have a giant budget. Here's the reason why I like them so much. Every single person who listens to those Spotify listen to Spotify. So if your podcast is on Spotify and you're promoting on the same platform, it's not difficult at all for that person to just click on a link and stay in the platform they're already in.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Adam Adams
So it's a very effective one if you have the budget for it. But it generally costs 20 or $30,000 a month to be able to do that. So not everybody is going to have that type of budget. But it's a really good one. Here's, a cheap one, collaborations. So just like what Tim and I are doing, your host and me, I'm on his show today, and tomorrow we're recording him on my show as well. And what this means is I can add value to you, his listener, and you may or may not come and join me on my podcast. You may or may not say, I liked what you had. I'm going to hire you. And the same thing when Tim's on my podcast, he's hacking in to my network, my followers, and one or two of them are going to move over to this podcast because it's obvious for them, and if they don't, they've at least have that awareness. They remember the content. They're more likely to share it with other people. And it grows that influence. Finally, when doing that, it makes Adam Adams and Tim Fitzpatrick more searchable on the Internet. When we are doing our due diligence to work with somebody, we generally will Google them. Nowadays, this is a normal thing. We're going to say, Adam Adams, let's see if he's got any negative feedback. He sounds great, but I want to make sure nobody's saying anything bad about him before I spend that kind of money. So they search, and then this comes up. Another one comes up, another one comes up. And they're like, oh, this guy's really well known, has nothing negative. Maybe I will hire him. So by having this, it grows your SEO, it grows your credibility, it grows your searchability so that people can go to that trust factor. Remember the KLTI Blueprint know like trust and invest. The trust is the one right before investing. And being able to find you when searching and find good things about you is a helpful way for most people, just like the social proofing on Amazon and podcasting to allow them to say, hey, let's go ahead and work with this person. So there's a lot I could definitely keep going on paid ads. Those are a lot of what we do in our company, though.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love that. There's a lot of podcast marketing agencies that don't do anything with the marketing side of it. They're just doing the logistics. So i love that that is something that's built into what you do because so many people overlook it, especially the paid ad side of it. So if you do have budget where you can put some budget in to help grow the show, you're different in offering that. So I love that. This has been fantastic. Adam, any last minute thoughts you want to leave us with before we close things out today?

Adam Adams
I like it. I will say that a thing that a lot of podcasters are afraid to do. They don't have the confidence immediately that they can get good guests. So maybe we could end with that. Because I've been interviewing, I've published a little over 200 episodes. I think it's around 250 now. And because I know this is a very normal concern for most new podcasters about getting good guests. I ask almost every guest on my show, how do you get good guests? And they generally will say, it's way easier than I thought. I thought it was going to be hard. I thought everybody was going to say no. I thought, who would want to be on my show? But then they find that it's like they're almost fighting people off because a lot of people want that exposure. A lot of people want to add value. And so it's much, much easier than they thought. And a couple of resources for that would be like Podbooker, PodMatch, even paid companies like Interview Valet, it's like cost money to get on. But these help you to get people on your show and to actually do what we mentioned before, where you're getting on their show and hacking into the people that follow them. So I would just say, don't be afraid of getting good guests. It's much easier than once you get started. It just seems so easy.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, that's a fantastic piece of advice, Adam. You know what you're doing, people. If you are interested in starting a podcast and you don't want to do all the work, adam knows what the hell he's doing. Where can people go to learn more about you?

Adam Adams
I really appreciate that, Tim. Our website is Growyourshow.com, and if somebody just wants to check out the podcast, it's free. They could just go to the Podcast on podcasting. Very interesting name. I call it Pop for short. But the Podcast on Podcasting is a free resource for you. Hundreds of episodes where every single one is to help you be a better podcaster.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it, Adam. Thank you so much, man. I appreciate you taking the time. Head on over to growyourhowcom. Or if you want to listen to Pop, search the podcast on podcasting on your favorite platform and check it out. I want to thank you guys for watching, listening. I appreciate you. Again, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. A couple of things I want to let you know. If you are struggling with your marketing, you're not sure what that next step should be, what direction you should be headed, head on over to our website at rialtomarketing.com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O marketing.com. Book a free GPS call and I will help give you some guidance and point you in the right direction to go to get where you want to go faster. If you want access to the 90 day marketing plan template that we use for our business, our clients, you can get that over at growthmarketingplan.com. All the downloads, the templates you need, sample plans, the video instructions, they're all there. As Adam touched with podcasting, it's no different with your overall marketing or anything else in business. You got to have a plan if you want to get to where you want to go faster. Thanks so much. Till next time. Take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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