How To Overcome The Roadblocks Most People Face When Creating New Habits

December

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Once you’ve formed a positive habit, things become much easier. The hard part is creating the habit itself. We have Jeff Wickersham from Morning Fire Coaching with us today. He is a high-performance coach, Tony Robbins award winner, and recently hit 1,000 straight days of a cold shower/ice bath. He is going to share his experience and wisdom with us today so we can overcome the roadblocks most people face when creating new habits.

Join Jeff Wickersham and Tim Fitzpatrick for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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How To Overcome The Roadblocks Most People Face When Creating New Habits



Tim Fitzpatrick
Once you've formed a positive habit, things become much easier. The hard part is creating the habit itself. We have a special guest with us today. He is a high-performance coach, a Tony Robbins Award winner and recently hit 1000 straight days of a cold shower or ice bath. We are going to get into that. He is going to share his experience, his wisdom with us to help us overcome those common roadblocks that we face when creating new habits. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. I am super excited to have with me, Jeff Wickersham from Morning Fire Coaching. Jeff, welcome. And thanks for being here.

Jeff Wickersham
Tim, thanks for having me excited for the conversation.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, me too. So before we dig into it, you got to tell me, what's the deal with this ice bath? Cold shower? Do I need to start doing this?

Jeff Wickersham
I would say yes. And I know we're going to talk about mental challenges and the mental battle that each and every one of us face on a daily basis. This is one method, and I'm a huge Wim Hof fan. I don't know if you know who Wim Hof is, but he's the iceman over in Europe. Done amazing things. Healed his body through breathing and cold exposure. But I will tell you the mental battle that you face when you want to get into a cold shower and I start cold and I end cold. There's no warm water. Your mind tells you many times over not to do it. Having the ability to tell your mind to go sit in the corner. I'm going forward and I'm going to do this anyway. It's incredibly powerful, and it teaches you as we're going to talk about habits. It teaches you that habit of being in control of your thoughts, in control of what you want to do, not being at the mercy of your mind, and maybe those negative thoughts that might play.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So do you not take warm showers anymore at all?

Jeff Wickersham
I do every so often. Let's say one of my sons had a football game a couple of weeks ago. It was 50 degrees out. It was pouring rain midway through. I did take a warm shower. But funny story, last winter, my wife and two sons said there's an issue with the hot water heater, and I hadn't taken a hot shower in about three months. And I said, I don't know what you're talking about, but they said it's only warm for about a minute, so we had to get it repaired. But for the most part, no cold showers, even in the dead of winter.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Now, has your water bill gone down or your showers shorter?

Jeff Wickersham
They are shorter, right? Obviously. But I'm still washing the body and it's still three to five minutes in the cold water.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Awesome. So it's about that mindset and creating that habit, right. If you can do that, there's so many other things you can accomplish.

Jeff Wickersham
Absolutely. And obviously there's some physical benefits to it. But I really love the mental side and you feel just invigorated. One that you got through it and you won that battle and it wakes you up. It really is just going through that process of winning that mental battle and saying, "I am in control of what I'm doing." Not the other way around.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Now, on the physical benefits side of it, is it mostly about inflammation reduction?

Jeff Wickersham
It definitely can help with inflammation. It helps with your immune system. It helps with circulation. If you think about you're in the cold, what happens? All the blood rushes into your vital organs. So you're getting that rush. And then when you're out of the shower, you get that release. So circulation improves immunity. It activates brown fat in the body, which brown fat has been shown to burn calories when you activate it. So definitely it helps with your skin. Helps with your hair. Obviously, the hair boat left me a while ago, but it definitely helps with those things from a physical perspective.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Very cool. Thank you for sharing that.

Jeff Wickersham
Yes, you got it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So we're going to jump into some rapid-fire questions, help us get to know you a little bit.

Jeff Wickersham
Okay.

Tim Fitzpatrick
When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Jeff Wickersham
With my family.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's your hidden talent?

Jeff Wickersham
Consistency. Just being able to be consistent in some things that aren't that exciting at times.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, 1000 straight days of a cold shower. I'd say you can be consistent. What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Jeff Wickersham
I think it was Les Brown that said, do it as hard and your life will be easy. Do it as easy and your life will be hard.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Like it. What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Jeff Wickersham
I can be pretty darn lazy. Like, if I let that mind win that battle, I can go on the couch and binge Netflix for 2, 3 hours. I am wired just like everybody else. I just have a higher standard that I control my mind. I don't let my mind control me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What does success mean to you?

Jeff Wickersham
Success to me means freedom. Freedom to choose. Do whatever you want. Spend the time with whoever you want.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Jeff Wickersham
I would say the gym. Exercising, right? Just exercising in general. So wherever I'm exercising, that is just the physicality of exercising, it unlocks so much in your life from a mental ability to have energy, focus. So exercising would be my happy place.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And what qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Jeff Wickersham
Positivity and energy. Those two things you bring those to a conversation and interaction, you can absolutely change somebody's life. And when you have two positive energetic forces together, it's amazing how the energy builds and you just feel fantastic.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. So tell us more about Morning Fire Coaching. Who are you working with? What are you doing? Let's dig into that a little bit.

Jeff Wickersham
Yeah. And I'll start Tim where my journey starts before I get into it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Absolutely.

Jeff Wickersham
It's so foundational to who I am as a person. And it'll be seven years in December coming up where I lost my mom to breast cancer. So when I had the passing of my mother, it was that gut punch, right? It was that cut at the knees. When you watch the woman that brought you into this world, leave this world, you question everything. And that was really the start of my journey. I was in corporate America. I decided to leave shortly thereafter. Opened up a gym locally because I was always into fitness. My late mother was always into fitness. And then what organically grew out of that was high-performance coaching. I saw that people would put in a ten-question application through Facebook to come in and visit me in the gym. Only 15, 20% maybe would respond to a text, email, phone call as well as I was battling those mental demons that we all battle. Negative beliefs from our childhood, from something we heard. So I went down that deep personal development, rabbit hole coaches, courses, podcast, books, you name it. And that's where I really landed on. How do you book in your days? What does that last 30 minutes of the day look like? How do you prepare for success in the morning? How are you intentional on what you're going to succeed, right when you wake up? And then what's that 1st 30 minutes of the day look like? And how do you stack wins right when you wake up? That's your time only to get all this momentum in your day. And it's from a physical standpoint, mental standpoint, spiritual standpoint. And that's where the four-step Morning Fire Methodology, the rise, fight, love, repeat, was born. And now I coach clients on that process. Run a couple of masterminds as well. And it's just amazing when you put these simple, not easy, right? When you create a habit, it's never easy, but simple things in place. You do them over and over. That repetition. That consistency. How much of a difference they make in your life?

Tim Fitzpatrick
I want to touch on this because I talk about this all the time from a marketing standpoint. I think it's really important what you just said about simple versus easy. When I think of easy, I think of it as it can happen without effort. Simple is it's uncomplicated. It's easily understood, but there's still work involved. How do you view those two things?

Jeff Wickersham
I would agree with you 100%. And it's amazing when clients come in and either go through my ten-week program or join one of my masterminds and they start these foundational habits at night and in the morning. And it can be a couple of days, and they're like, "Oh, my gosh, I can't believe the difference. And it's so simple." I said, "Yes, it is." We overcomplicate the heck out of everything in life. You set your foundation, you book end your days with these 30 minutes, everything in the middle takes care of itself, right? You feel all this momentum, you feel energy, you feel focused, you get more time back in your day because you're actually spending time on yourself. We've all heard that's selfish to do. It's actually, the most unselfish thing you can do is actually get better physically, get better mentally, show up for all those around you. So I would fully agree with you on that statement.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Let's talk about habits. And before we get into this first question, which is why do so many people fail when creating habits. I want to ask you an initial question to get your feedback on this, but I have read anywhere that it takes anywhere from 30 to 60 days to create a new habit. Are you in line with that? What are your thoughts there?

Jeff Wickersham
I am. And studies have shown obviously, it depends on how frequent you do the habit that you're creating and the person. It can take anywhere from 21 to 67 days to build a habit. So you wonder why. And so many people don't have an awareness of that. We've all probably heard it takes 21 days to create a habit. Well, we've kind of been lied to in that case. Right. And it's no wonder why the third week in January is the most depressing week of the year because so many people fail. But if you don't have an awareness, you're set up for failure. So having awareness of it being anywhere from 21 to 67 days, then you're mentally prepared. "Hey, it could take me ten weeks." And that's why one of my programs is ten weeks long to get you past that threshold. But if you don't have an awareness, it's so hard to be successful. So I totally agree with you there. It's anywhere from 21 to 67 days. And they've done some brain scans to kind of see what the mind looks like, what those neural networks look like as you go through that process.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Why do we fail in creating habits?

Jeff Wickersham
Number one, we bite off more than we can chew. Right. We try and go so fast, so quick. And one of Simon Sinek's books, he says, and I love this line, "Consistency is more important than intensity." And if you are consistent over time, you will get there. The problem is we're wired to be so intense, so quick. But then what happens is you get a negative association with something you're doing. Let's take working out for example. You hit the gym in January. All right. I'm going to work out 60 minutes every day, every day of the year. Well, you haven't worked out in ten years. What's going to happen. When you work out for 60 minutes for two or three days, you're going to be so sore you can't get up and down the steps or off the toilet. And now you have a negative emotion tied to the activity. And when you have that tied, it's so hard to get back in and continue doing it. So I would say one is starting small. Right. Instead of starting so intense, just start small. We'll use exercise, go for a walk, five minutes for the week. Next week, add on five minutes, continue to do that for the first month, then go to the gym, maybe for 10,15 minutes. Right. Just continue to add on rather than going so intense right out of the gate. So that would be a major thing. The other piece is when we're creating a new habit. One of the great things I learned from James Clear book, Atomic Habits was this concept of pairing your habit with something you already enjoy. And when you can do that, you're setting yourself up for success. And I had a friend whose wife was pregnant with her second child, and he said, "Her nerves are frayed. I think meditation would be great for." I said, "Well, does she like to drink coffee?" He said, "Yes. Decaffeinated." Obviously, since she was pregnant, I said, "Well, have her brew a cup of coffee, go in and breathe meditate. And her reward is that coffee at the end of meditation." So if you compare a habit with something that's already established, you're going to be that much more successful.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So in that case, you're rewarding yourself in a healthy way for practicing the habit. Is that right?

Jeff Wickersham
Correct.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Which encourages you to continue to be consistent.

Jeff Wickersham
Right. And you already have that existing habit established. So you want that reward, and now you're going to implement that other habit that you're creating. It just pairs them together and it increases your likelihood of success.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Love it. Any other common reasons why we fall short in creating habits?

Jeff Wickersham
I would say another piece is the language we use. And I've been so aware of this. I speak to my clients about this, especially the past month is the language we speak out related to what we're going to accomplish. And so many times we'll use the word try or I should or I could. Those words suck. You are giving yourself an out. You've got 1 foot on the beach, the other foot in the boat, or you've got a door behind you. You are giving yourself an out. And when you use that type of language, you're not going to be successful. Or maybe you'll be successful 5, 3% of the time. Instead, I am doing this. Give your mind and speak it out into existence, zero doubt about what you're going to accomplish. And even just saying I try, my shoulders almost slump over as I say it. When I say I am, I feel so much more in control, powerful. And our language dictates so much of what we accomplished. So using those words try, should, could, eliminate those from your vocabulary. Be absolutely certain about what you're going to accomplish. And it's amazing when you state it out loud, you speak it into existence. The mind follows because the mind says, "Holy crap, Jeff or Tim, they are not messing around. We better figure this out because we are moving forward."

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. So you touched on this a little bit about your morning routine. Tell us more about that. Why are morning routines so important?

Jeff Wickersham
So I'll use sports as an example because I have two sons and I coach them in football and basketball. I relate when most people wake up in the morning. They are playing defense. And if you're a fan of basketball or you know the game of basketball, defense, you're bending your knees and you're bending your hips right. It Burns the quads pretty darn quickly. Well, that sounds so many people play from the moment their alarm clock goes off. You're playing defense. You're dictated by emails, by text messages, by hitting the Snooze button three times and being in a rush, you are playing defense. So it's no wonder why at the end of the day you finish a day, you flop on the couch, you turn on the TV, you're exhausted, stressed. You have nothing left because you're playing defense all day long, and it's so tiring. Well, flip that and be in control. Imagine being on the offensive. Imagine knowing exactly what you're going to execute when you wake up. You're going to stack these wins all in a 30-minute time interval. You're going to exercise a bit, drink water, meditate, do all these things that light you up. That make you feel good. Give you this sense of accomplishment, right when you wake up. The other things that happen throughout your day, you're already feeling positive, you're already feeling energetic, you're already feeling focused, you're already feeling awake. That is such a difference compared to the other side of playing defensive. It's truly foundational. I see people wanting to get better from a fitness perspective, wanting to build businesses, all these things. But I say so many times they're trying to build this skyscraper of a business, but their habits are quicksand, right? There's no foundation to what you're doing day out. So you might be trying really hard and you might be working really hard. But you're constantly climbing a ladder that is sinking in quicksand until you have that foundation. Bookend your days, 30 minutes in the morning, 30 minutes at night. It truly is an uphill battle.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So in a sense, your morning routines, they're filling your tank for the day.

Jeff Wickersham
Absolutely. Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And helping you get started on the right foot.

Jeff Wickersham
Correct. And we have choices throughout our day that we make and imagine waking up and getting 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 things accomplished in the first half an hour, moving the body breathing, drinking some water, getting all these quick wins. You feel good about yourself because you've accomplished something. You don't feel good about yourself when you hit the snooze button for three times and then throw yourself in the shower or late for work, you feel crappy. What happens then? More than likely you have a crappy day.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Let's talk about meditation a little bit. What's your practice for meditation? I know it's different for different people.

Jeff Wickersham
So I still use guided meditation to this day. I'm about 45 days away from four straight years of meditating, at least ten minutes a day, and I still use guided meditation because my mind still wanders, right? It's always a practice. But one of the things I love to do is close my mouth and breathe through my nose, right? Studies have shown I've read books about oxygen and breath work. Breathing through our nose gives us so many benefits from a natural filtration device to increase in our nitric oxide that helps us as human beings. But breathing in and studies showing five and a half seconds is the optimal time for a breath in and breath out. Just focusing on my breath. Listening to some meditation. I do it early in the morning, right? It's dark out and quiet, and it just gives me peace. Let's be honest, the chaos that is life. So just spending a little time breathing centering yourself. It's incredibly powerful practice and have it to adopt.

Tim Fitzpatrick
With guided meditation, do you use one of the many apps that are out there?

Jeff Wickersham
I do. I use Insight Timer as my app. I love that app because it tracks how many consecutive days I've done it. I've gotten to 14 hundred in 15 days, right. Because every time I see it and okay, I'm definitely not missing this. And obviously now, after four years, it's become such a habit and such a ritual that I do on a daily basis, much easier. But when I was building it, it was that gamification a little bit and that competitiveness in me to say, "Let me see how far I can take it." Now, I'm almost to four years.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I use the Call Map. Have you got the call?

Jeff Wickersham
Yes. I've used that before.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. And then Headspace is another one I know that a lot of people use. I like you need that guided meditation, or I like to hear somebody's voice at some point throughout the meditation because I have monkey brain. It's so easy for me just to go down some rabbit hole. But what a lot of people don't realize and what I fell into this trap when I first started meditating was I expected it to be. I had this ideal as we were talking about before we went on air, that it has to be this Zen experience, and I need to be totally calm and that's totally unrealistic. It's not the case. And so it's really more about when your mind wanders, you have the self-awareness to stop yourself and pull yourself back. That's really hard for me, but I keep working on it.

Jeff Wickersham
And so true, right? When you're focusing on your breath, if you take that as, "Hey, this is the practice I'm going to continue to build, continue to develop, continue to grow." And it one wanders. It does for me still at this point. But then I'll catch myself rather quickly and say, "All right, just control your breath. Focus on your breath." That again, is a habit of controlling your mind and controlling your thoughts. Very similar to how we spoke earlier in the show related to those cold showers and making that more of a practice.

Tim Fitzpatrick
A lot of what we've touched on, I think relies on a lot of mental toughness, discipline. If we're struggling with that with mental toughness, can we develop it? Do you have it or do you not have it?

Jeff Wickersham
You absolutely can develop it. And when you go through that process of developing. It's an amazingly rewarding experience. And I would say one get a coach, get a mentor, get an accountability partner or somebody to hold you to the fire or put it out on social media. Here's what I'm going to go accomplish, because when you do that, there is a subconscious switch that flips, even though nobody really cares if you complete whatever you're going to say. But you inherently don't want to look like a liar. So you follow through with it. But I call it the rainy day mentality, right? The rainy day mentality is it's raining out, it's dark out. I'm ready to go for a run. 99.9% of people say conditions aren't right. I shouldn't go. Imagine getting that rainy day mentality having that mental toughness to say, "You know what? I'm going to get ahead of 99% of people. So I'm still going for that run." When you can develop that type of mindset, it's incredibly powerful, and I always fall back to pushing yourself physically. I don't know if you know who David, are you familiar with David Goggins? He's an ultra marathon runner. Been a Navy Seal. Incredible badass human being. He put out a challenge a couple of years ago, and I was actually challenged by a guy in my mastermind to run 4 miles every 4 hours for 48 hours straight. So you basically do almost what comes to two marathons in a weekend. And I am not a runner. But I was challenged and I said, "Okay, that's something that's difficult. It's time to build some mental toughness." So last March, I started 11:00 p.m. at night, and every 4 hours I ran 4 miles until Sunday at 07:00. And you talk about the physicality unlocking that mental toughness. Wow, being able to push myself through that, then I know I can accomplish other things. So put yourself in difficult physical situation, stress yourself physically and you build that mental toughness through that process.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that example. So it's by challenging yourself continually, you are building your mental toughness?

Jeff Wickersham
Absolutely. Yes. And the best way I have found to do that is through physical exercise challenge, some type of goal mission that you have out there. Then that dictates your actions because, you know, you've got that out there. You've got something to shoot for. And so many times people don't have anything out in the horizon. So it's no wonder why it's hard to build an exercise program or eat better or build a business or make the calls you should to potential customers.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I'm assuming in that challenge you talked about, you tell me, but at some point there you hit a wall and mentally you had to talk yourself through that to then go. I'm not into, like, long marathon or anything like that, but I mountain bike with the guy that does ultramarathon type stuff and he's like, "Yeah, you always at this point where you're not quite sure if you're going to make it, you start to fade. And, once you push through it, you're fine. But you got to push through it. "Do you find that or is it similar?

Jeff Wickersham
I absolutely hit it in that race endeavor that challenge that I did, I would say. And this is again to preparing for success like that 30 minutes before you go to bed. I prepped. Right. I was running four-mile increments a couple of weekends before every 4 hours to get my body ready. I knew exactly what I was going to do from a rest to recovery perspective. Ice cold bath, compression sleeves. I ate the same thing after my run at 07:00 a.m. on Saturday that I did 07:00 a.m. on Sunday. I also had, we talked about accountability, I also had people running legs with me, so I had somebody there to keep me in line, make sure I was doing it and to push me and pull me as I was going through. But I do remember it was Saturday at 03:00. I guess that was probably my 6th or five or sixth length, and my mind was just beating me up like you are crazy. What are you doing? Just quit. This is insane. And it was a leg that I did with my father, and he was riding his bike and he was up in front of me. And I didn't have anybody there necessarily to talk to. And those are where you just have to stay committed to what you're doing and tell your mind to go sit in the corner. I'm not listening to you. I'm finishing. I'm completing this. I've got it. That positive self-talk and really taking control of your mind. So I did have that moment. But Luckily I prepared. I knew I would have it as similar to creating new habits. Prepare, set yourself up for success. And then the likelihood that you'll reach success is that much higher.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Did you find I'm sure it was painful running after that happened. But, was it as bad, right? Or once you broke through that mental block, it hurt. But you're like, I've got this.

Jeff Wickersham
It hurt. But after the you play mind games with yourself, right. So it's twelve lengths every time I did a length like I started 11:00 p.m. On Friday night. After I did that 11:00 p.m. leg, I was like, I only have one 11 p.m. leg left. When I did it at 03:00 a.m. I said, I only have one left. So you're already halfway there. And that's those mind games that you can play with yourself to continue to have you move. Once I got through the 07:00 p.m. leg on Saturday, I was halfway there. All right. I'm already done half. I can get through the rest. It was such a physical and mental challenge, but once you got through it, you know that we leave so much physical and mental capacity in our bodies on tap. We just don't tap into enough of it. Unless you're pushing the limits, you aren't going to find it. And I don't like to run. Big challenge. And I actually ran a half marathon later in the year. That almost killed me. But pushing yourself again, putting yourself in hard places and difficult things, it unlocks other things that you weren't aware of. That you had.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome stuff. Any last-minute words of wisdom, thoughts you want to leave us with?

Jeff Wickersham
Each and every day is a gift. And today is a gift you will never get back. So choose to jump and play in your greatness right. We all have a hero inside. There have been chains that have put on you from society, from negative beliefs from your childhood. But every single day is a true gift. And just knowing that with losing my mother to breast cancer, I just appreciate our conversation every single day. And if you can live in the present moment, you're going to be incredibly happy.

Tim Fitzpatrick
If people want to learn more about your programs, you mentioned you have a mastermind, and then you have your ten-week program, right? C

Jeff Wickersham
orrect. So they can go out to themorningfire dot com. If they want to grab my book, which is out on Amazon, they can go on Amazon and find Rise, Fight, Love, Repeat, Ignite Your Morning Fire. I've got Morning Fire for Entrepreneurs podcast. I know Tim was a recent guest on the podcast as well, but you go out to themorningfire dot com. You can grab a time with me. You can check out anything that I put out there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Are a lot of the people that you work with are they business owners or are they high-level, exec-type people? Does it run the game? What does that look like?

Jeff Wickersham
I would say it's a combination of both there that you just mentioned, right. And it's people that are looking for that next level of success that they might be struggling. How do I get there? They've reached a certain level, but now they want to go higher, and they might be caught in that rut of how so many of us fall into. Right? One day becomes a week becomes a month becomes three years, and they need a shift. They need to change. And that's one of the things one of my clients recently said, just like this guy that shakes the snow globe, he shakes the snow globe and gets us out of what we're used to, and that then transfers to growth, transformation, and further development.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Would you say anybody that's looking for that edge that is going to help propel them to the next level?

Jeff Wickersham
Absolutely. If you don't have a bulletproof morning routine that sets you up for success, that is what I do day in and day out with my clients. I'm in the trenches as well, performing the morning fire routine, and it's incredibly incredibly powerful.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. I love it. If you guys are interested, hop on over there. I can tell you right now, I have talked to Jeff twice now, and I get energy from it every time. So thank you for that. I appreciate that. Hop on over there. He obviously knows what he's doing. Can fire you up and help you get to that next level. So, Jeff, thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you for those who are listening, watching whenever you're listening and watching. Some people are doing it live now, but some people will do it after the fact. So thank you for that. Again, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. If you are struggling with some aspect of your marketing, you're trying different tactics. Nothing seems to work. You're not sure what's working right. You've been doing it, and you're not sure if you're getting an ROI on it. Hop on over to our site. RIalto Marketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing dot com click on the Get a Free Consultation button. Be happy to chat with you and give you some clarity on what your next right steps should be. Thanks so much. Til next time. Take care.


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