How to Use Partnership Marketing to Grow Your Business for Free

May

27

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Are there ways to grow your business for free? Yes, there are! And we’ve got Dustin Reichmann with us who is going to share one of them. It’s called partnership marketing. You'll discover how to leverage this incredible marketing channel to quickly scale your business & massively expand your online network.

Join Dustin Riechmann and Tim Fitzpatrick for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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How to Use Partnership Marketing to Grow Your Business for Free



Tim Fitzpatrick
Are there ways to grow your business for free? Yes, there are. And we've got a special guest who's going to share one of them with us today. It's called Partnership Marketing, and you'll discover how to leverage this incredible marketing channel to quickly scale your business and massively expand your online network. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. Super excited to have with me today, Dustin Reichmann from Simple Success Coaching. Dustin, thanks for taking the time. I appreciate it.

Dustin Riechmann
I'm very excited to be here, Tim. Really looking forward to sharing all about the fun and wild world of partnership marketing with your audience.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, before we jumped on air, you were talking about, hey, not a lot of people talk about partnership marketing, so things are going to come up in people's minds, and that may not necessarily be exactly what you mean when you talk about partnership marketing. So we're going to cover it all, dig deep, and I am excited to do that. But before we do that, I want to ask you some rapid-fire questions to help us get to know you. Are you ready for this?

Dustin Riechmann
I am.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Cool. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Dustin Riechmann
Really? Anything outdoors. I love to run, cycle, hike, fish. I have a wife of 20 years and three kids. Just anything I can do to spend time with them, preferably outside my house.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. What's your hidden talent, boy?

Dustin Riechmann
Hidden talent? I've double jointed thumbs.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Oh, man.

Dustin Riechmann
I've never lost a game of thumb war in my life. There's no other, like, physical, anything unusual about me, physically or remarkable. I'm not that great at an athlete or anything, but I can bend my thumb really crazy, and it doesn't hurt.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Oh, my God. So for those that can't see, they're listening to the podcast side of this, Dustin's thumbs are like bending at a right angle. That's a cool hidden talent. I've never had anybody do that. What's the best piece of advice that you've ever been given?

Dustin Riechmann
Best piece of advice I've been spoken to me was about five years into our marriage. We were at a marriage retreat, and we were actually there to help present, and we were part of a marriage Ministry. But someone speaking told me after, like, the whole key to this marriage thing, they've been married a long time. It's like, make sure you and your wife carve out 15 minutes a day of quality time just to be together as a couple without all the other stuff, because I've always been a hard worker and I would work in the evenings. And so we just developed this habit that we'd have. Our time for us is when the kids went to bed. All right. We have our 15 minutes together to share and connect and then maybe I will go work in my office or she'll go out with a friend. But we've got that time set every day and that's been a game changer. The other thing that I don't think it was advice. I felt like it was more of an epiphany. When I was getting ready to leave my engineering career and become an entrepreneur full time, I had this fear and this anxiety about the whole thing. And then one day it just hit me that, you know, Dustin, there really aren't any permanent decisions. I mean, there's a few exceptions. Like, hopefully your marriage is permanent. If you have a religious vocation, that's probably permanent. Having kids is permanent. But outside of those really few things, all this stuff is reversible. So I just had this piece that's like, you know what? I could leave and I could go to entrepreneurism or entrepreneurship, and frankly, if I stink at it, I can just come back to engineering and this is not a permanent decision. So that really freed me from a lot of anxiety. And now I view a lot of things in business as experiments. And I don't get hung up on this permanency of taking action on something.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Things change, all things change, right?

Dustin Riechmann
Absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Dustin Riechmann
For people that only know me in the context of talking business and coaching, it's that I have a master's degree in traffic engineering.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I didn't even know there was such a thing.

Dustin Riechmann
Exactly. That makes it really unusual. So, yeah, I did things like design, interchanges, program, traffic signals, design, roundabouts, all kinds of crazy stuff. But yeah, traffic engineering is its own art and science, and I did it for a long time.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What does success mean to you?

Dustin Riechmann
For me, success is basically using your talents to serve others. Like the times I feel successful is when I see someone else winning or making progress. And I think that's why I was so drawn to initially marriage, ministry, and business coaching, because I'm able to take all the experience and gifts that I've been given and kind of pour them out on the others. And I tried to do that with my family, my community, but also in business. So to me, that made me say, when have you felt successful? That's probably the easiest way I can answer the question. It's when I've given a win to others.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Dustin Riechmann
I'd say geographically, we talked about this a little before the call, but the mountains and especially in the summertime. I live near St. Louis, Missouri, and it is flat and it is humid. The fall is nice, but the other three seasons are not so nice. So I love in the summertime to get out to Colorado or did a backpacking trip last year in Wyoming, and that was just fantastic. So I love to just be out in wilderness, preferably in the mountains.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Dustin Riechmann
I love being around people who are ambitious, humble people who like to serve. So I guess that's kind of coming up as a common theme here. But people who are just giving and they're ambitious. So it's not like they're reserved necessarily, but when they take action, it's really to try to build a bigger pie for everyone else, like abundant thinkers, I guess is a good way to say that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it. So, Dustin, tell us, what are you doing with Simple Success Coaching? Who are you working with? What's that look like? Tell us a little bit more about your backstory.

Dustin Riechmann
Absolutely. Yeah, the quick backstory to kind of tie all this stuff together. So I did practice engineering consulting for 18 years. And as I mentioned, that was my education. I did a lot with that and taught at University and did different things. But throughout my career in that world, I always had side hustles. So Engage Marriage. You kind of see for the people on video the brand behind me. That was our first brand. I created that in 2009. It still exists. It's like a digital products membership site for marriage enrichment. So obviously grew out of my marriage Ministry in growing that. We wrote a book and did some speaking, and then I got into digital marketing really heavy in like, 2015, I think, is when that really kicked off. So that really helped us grow that business. And then I started doing marketing consulting on the side while I was doing engineering during the day. Finally, in 2017 is kind of that fateful thing we talked about earlier. That fateful moment. I was like, you know what, I can leave this. So I did. So since the beginning of 2018, I've been a full time entrepreneur, doing a variety of things. But in addition to Engaged Marriage, I founded in 2019 or co founded, I should say, an ecommerce company. It's called Fire Creek Snacks. And so that takes quite a bit of my time nowadays where I'm running at the sales and marketing side, and I've got a partner who's really a product genius. He's a third generation Butcher, and it's a craft better for you meat stick, basically, but it's been very popular, very proud of the brand. We'll hit seven figures this year. We've done all that without paid ads, which will tie directly into what we're talking about today with marketing. That's what we use to grow that business. So in doing that and being visible and telling that story and basically marketing Fire Creek, I started having a bunch of inbound interests about, how do you do that? That's where the business coaching. It was completely organic. I've been doing it for a couple of years. I've had a couple of dozen one on one clients and never actually had a website until about three months ago. So it's like the Cobblers kids have no shoes. I did no messaging, and that has evolved into small groups and now Masterminds. And so the people I work with primarily, I would define them as like mission driven entrepreneurs, people who love to talk about the story, the reason, the purpose behind their brand, and those characteristics I talked about earlier, people that are giving, that are mission oriented, but they can take many forms. So I've got clients and Mastermind members who are coaches, consultants, marketing agency owners, ecommerce people, and not in the Mastermind format, but in one on one. I've got several local businesses to people that you wouldn't think we're going to talk a lot about, things like podcasting, things that can happen at scale for an online business. But there are analogous versions of that for local business. So it's really about the mindset of partnerships and that's we'll talk in a minute about partnership marketing, but that's hopefully it gives you from engineering graduate to meat stick man to business coach, how this stuff kind of came about.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I never would have tied all those things together, but it's always interesting how where our paths take us.

Dustin Riechmann
You never know. Looking back, I can see all those dots, but there's no way in the world I would have predicted it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Let's dig into it, man. What's partnership marketing, how does it work?

Dustin Riechmann
Yeah. Well, in the simplest form, it is getting your expertise, your brand, your business in front of your target market on someone else's platform. Right. So a very simple example, the one that we use in our Masterminds is kind of the ramp up to kind of get everyone in the frame of mind for how to approach this. And it's really effective is exactly what we're doing today. Podcast guests is an excellent example for an online business of partnership marketing. And so it's a win-win-win is one key. Right. So it's a win for your audience because hopefully they're going to learn some things today that they can apply and make more money and grow their business. It's a win for you, Tim, if I do a good job, because you've got a great podcast episode and some marketing assets and things here to help grow your audience. And of course, it's a win for me because there might be someone listening in your audience who really resonates with this, wants to reach out, maybe ultimately does coaching or wants to be in a Mastermind to really build the system into their own business. The win, win, win and basically putting yourself on other people's platforms, typically almost exclusively, in my case, for free, to grow your own business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. So getting our expertise, our message out in front of our target market, using and leveraging someone else's audience.

Dustin Riechmann
Exactly. And doing it in a way that's not taking but giving.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. It's not all hard sell, hard sell, hard sell. Right. It's coming from a place of value, educating people, serving. I love it. When I told you this before we jumped on air when I saw partnership marketing, the first thing that came to my mind was strategic partners, referral partners, power partners, whatever you want to call them. How do those play into partnership marketing? Do you see those as part of it? Is it something different? What are your thoughts on that?

Dustin Riechmann
I very much view it as part of it. Typically, to me, that comes from a deepening of an initial partnership. So for example, we do a podcast episode and we really resonate. And because you've heard my story and you can see my knowledge in action, maybe Tim and I after this. It's like, Tim, tell me more about what your agency does. Oh, yeah. Okay. Well, we don't do partnership marketing and I'm like, well, I don't do ads or whatever. And so we get a referral relationship, but it's built upon the fact that I came here and we developed a deep relationship by talking for half an hour and really unpacking the story. So yes, things like affiliate, joint venture, absolutely part of it, but not in the sense of going on Clickbank if people are familiar with that and just picking a product to try to push it to get an affiliate Commission much more at a relational level and at a strategic level. So whenever I'm working with clients, one of the first objections they may have is, well, let's say I'm a business coach. Well, what business coach in their right mind is going to have me on their podcast? Because we're competitors. You're not going to talk to someone who does exactly what you do. Right. You should be complimenting and educating their audience on something that they don't typically hear. So like a really simple example that I've done for marriage. So Engaged Marriage, and I don't do marriage coaching. But if I did, the natural inclination that people mostly come up with is the objection they bring upon themselves is I'm a marriage coach. I need to go get marriage coaching clients. So I'm going to go look at podcasts about marriage and marriage coaching. Well, the people hosting that podcast probably aren't going to have you on if you're going to be taking their clients. So how do we think about this? What else does your target audience hang out that wouldn't be competitive? So in the sense of this marriage example, maybe I go find a really good financial podcast and they're talking about money. And I say, hey guys, for people that are married, this money thing is typically just a symptom of bad communication. I would love to come on and educate your audience. Whether they're married or dating or whatever, there's going to be value to them about how to communicate well in marriage so that you can prosper in your wealth and your money so you can see they still have couples in their audience. But I'm not coming on there trying to teach the exact same thing that they talk about every week on this podcast. And I'm offering something fresh. So that's when I talk about mindset, you start thinking this way and then you start seeing these opportunities everywhere. Right. Like, I could go serve there, I could go help this. I could go get in front of this group in a way that is a win win win. And that's really what this is all about. We get very tactical when we work with clients. Obviously, we have systems. And this is not all just kind of big thinking, but you develop the mindset by doing the action where ultimately it's like instead of thinking, I can't think of a single person who would want me to partner with them. Like, you start having to limit yourself because there's too much, there's too many opportunities. They're everywhere.

Tim Fitzpatrick
They're all over the place. I love that. So the referral partners, strategic partners can naturally flow and come from your partnership marketing activities.

Dustin Riechmann
Yes. Whether it be with the host in the example I gave you or someone in the audience, I love just talking about examples because I've got a lot of them. But with Fire Creek, an example would be for a physical product, especially a food product. In our case, like subscription boxes are a great partnership model where we donate or give at cost food into a subscription box. So we get brand exposure. The subscription box obviously has a new, cool item to put in their box that month. And then, of course, the consumer gets to try something new and they love that. So it's a win win win. But we did something. It started with a simple conversation on LinkedIn with a guy that was right during the COVID shutdowns were starting in early summer 2020. And he was saying he worked at a place called Snack Nation. Are you familiar with Snack Nation?

Tim Fitzpatrick
No.

Dustin Riechmann
So they've rebranded to Karu. But their basic business model is they would send big boxes of better for you snacks into corporate break rooms to kind of fuel the workforce. Right. So their client would be like Facebook, and then they would send them thousands of snacks every month as a company benefit. Well, of course, everyone started working from home. They had to pivot their whole business model to make smaller boxes shipped directly to the employee's homes. And he was just talking about it on LinkedIn. I found it interesting. So I said, hey, man, can I send you some snacks just for your personal use? He said, sure, I love them. He's in the industry. It's what he loves to do. And we are a very small brand at that point relative to anyone that they would ever talk to because they have Fortune 500 type relationships. Well, he received it and he said, this terror stick is amazing. It's like the best one I've ever had. And so I said, cool. So he allowed us to do, in his mind, a small placement. We were in 8000 subscription boxes. We had to donate the product, so we were very much giving. But in exchange, we got new customers, reviews, and very importantly, we got the as seen and Snack Nation logo to put on our website because it made us more legitimate. I leveraged that to get on. They have their own podcast called Brand Builder. So we got on there and told our story. A lot of great relationships and brand collaborations and things resulted from that. It's such a niche podcast for the type of work that we do that was like the end of 2020. I thought that was the end of the story. And I thought, this is really cool. About two months ago here in 2022, I get this email from not the person I was dealing with then he moved on from the company, but this woman, Sharon at Karu, and I'm like Karu, and I looked it up. Snack Nation like, this is weird. Well, she says, I've taken over this buying position. I look back at old customer reviews and actually start listening to the podcast for the brands that would be in my category from our show. I love your story. What's your capacity? And long story short, she just had a purchase order for us of 600,000 Snap sticks for 2022 and not a donation, like paying us.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, this was not a donation.

Dustin Riechmann
That's a partnership in action. And a lot of what happens here is you plant seeds and you don't know exactly what seeds are going to sprout. And when I've been on many podcasts where I'll be on a Shopify podcast talking about Fire Creek and conversion rates and really nerdy tactical stuff, but I know there's enough people in that audience that want a better for you Snap stick. And I'll give a coupon code at the end in that case, and we would get a couple of $1,000 of direct sales. So I'm like, that's cool. And that's originally why I was doing it. Well, anyone who will hear me talk, there's got to be people in their audience who would buy something, but the unintended consequence was like, oh, wait, these people start reaching out after the show. There's distributors. I had an hour long Zoom call, like one on one with the head. Meet snacks buyer at Walmart from being on one of those shows because someone in the finance Department heard me and reached out and made a connection. Like, I got lots of stories that I won't keep blabbering on, but I want people that are listening to think about, like, in my industry, in my case, what's one partnership I could go do that would improve my business in a way that serves others. And that's really what this is all about.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So that leads perfectly into my next question. So how can business owners have this partnership marketing as part of their marketing system. And I love system. Right? We got to have systems. So how can we do this? How do we get started?

Dustin Riechmann
Absolutely. So when I started doing this, it was kind of random. After I started doing it multiple times, I realized that it was a system. And then when I started teaching other people multiple times and then in small groups, I really got dialed in. How can someone actually implement this? So I'll talk about like a four step framework, and then that'll help open up how this works in the system. So I think of it as step one is purpose. So if you're a business owner and let's just use podcast guesting as an example, because it's easy for anyone who's listening to a podcast can understand it. So, yes, I want to be on a podcast and talk about my brand. Why? That's number one, why would you want to do that? What are you going to get out of it? And that leads to your call to action. So if I put you on a show with your target audience listening and you tell your story at the end of that show, what is your call to action to that audience? Because to answer that question, you really have to understand why and the purpose. So step one is purpose. Step two is plan, and that's essentially the research. Right? So once I've decided to why I want to do it and who I want to talk to, I go find that target audience and find podcast in this example that they listen to. And we've got a lot of tools and tactics to do that. And again, at first you'll be like, man, I can't find three, and all of a sudden you'll have 3000 and you're like, there's way too many. I don't know which ones to target. And so we've got a way to prioritize those based on your audience size, their audience size, if you have any kind of relationship with the host, and we go through a lot of that. But that's a plan. So it's basically setting your prioritized list of target audiences that you want to get in front of. Step three is pitch. So ultimately you've got to get the person who has this audience a podcast post in this example to say yes. Right. So I've got I call the perfect pitch email template. Right. And I'll just go through it real quick, if that's okay.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Sure, absolutely.

Dustin Riechmann
Three pieces. So it's fairly simple, but it does take work the first time you put this together. So think about your target audience. And within that, the very first part is the part that changes with each pitch, with each email. And it's all about relational anchors. So if I get to know Tim and I listen to Tim's podcast, I understand we have something in common. Like we both like to ski or I hear something on a podcast, like some kind of personal connection, or at the very least, the fact that you actually do listen to the show and you actually have gotten value out of an episode. Like, basically I get pitched all the time. I have three different businesses going. I get pitched constantly. And you can tell immediately if someone is just a cold pitch and they have no idea who you are versus someone who opens up with some personal anecdote. That only happens if they've at least spent some time going through your profile on LinkedIn, but not in a way that everyone does. Right. So it's relational anchors is step one. And that's the magic because really getting people to open it and read that first paragraph is the absolute key to this whole thing. The middle piece is basically the show outline, like what's in it for the host? So if I can email Tim and I could say, hey, Tim and I established that I listened to this other episode and I really got a lot of value and I made this difference in my business. I have an idea for an episode, Tim. If it's okay, I'd like to share it. And four or five bullet points, like the questions Tim's asking me right now, it makes him as a host, say, like, oh, sweet, like this guy's thought through it. This is easy. I already have my show outline. I only have to do the work. Perfect. And then the final step is the call to action I usually use. Are you interested? It's kind of a passive way, but it still requires a response, but it doesn't make them commit 100% before they've ever talked to me. So I went into a lot of detail. But that's step three is pitch. That's kind of the art and science of this whole thing. It's a little softer skill set that you develop. But I typically work with clients, and once you have that first pitch, email, it doesn't have to be an email. But in this example, in email, well, then the next show, if it's a similar target audience, you really just have to change the relational anchors. Right. Because you're still wanting to tell the same story and give the same impact. So that's step three. And then the final step in the kind of basic framework here is perform. So that is helping people do really well preparing for a show, actually doing well on the show, having a clear call to action after the show. And then the really missing piece for most people is the follow up. So how can I support the show? Can I leave them a review? Can I share it on my LinkedIn when it comes live? Something that makes the host think fondly of you as a guest and refer you to other friends in their network, right? I would say the first three to five partnerships or podcast in this example are kind of hard and it takes work and you'll get some ghosted or no response sometimes. But once you get a little momentum, this becomes like way easier and that's where the system comes in. So the way I work with people is I have the business owner go through this process. If they have an assistant, they kind of tag along with them to kind of understand the framework. And then once they've kind of got those first three to five under their belt and they really understand it and they have an appreciation for it, then it becomes systematized. And so that as those four steps, the middle two are the ones that take all the time. Right. So step one is purpose. You do that once, basically, and the perform, you do have to show up and do your partnership. But the step two and three is the research and the pitching, writing these draft pitch emails. The good news is that's very teachable. That's very doable by any competent VA virtual assistant. So in our mastermind, we take people through this framework and then we go into this mode of, okay, let's either take someone from your team or if you don't have anyone, let's go, like literally hire a VA that will fit together. We'll train them together. And so by the time you're done, they are doing 80, 90% of the work on just an ongoing basis. And you just basically show up for interviews. And that's kind of the dream, right. If you like this type of marketing is you just show up for targeted interviews and we've got a lot more advanced stuff that we get into. Your point earlier, strategic partnerships, how to leverage the top 10% of these podcasts that you appear on. Like, how can you go deeper? How can you create a marketing flywheel by leveraging the exposure you get to get more exposure? Like the rich get richer is a stereotype for a reason. Once you get good at this and once you start doing it on a consistent basis, it really is like an exponential process.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Well, I love guest podcast speaking specifically, I know that's one of the main things that we've talked about. Once you get in the habit, it's not as hard as a lot of people think it is. You just have to have the right plan and you've obviously got that plan. We've got a plan. We're not reinventing the wheel here. Once you get used to it, you're on it. So I think the next logical question most people are going to have because a lot of people want like, hey, how can I get the I'm buying what you're selling, Dustin, what's the fastest way for me to start growing my business with partnership marketing? Like, how do I get started with this?

Dustin Riechmann
Yeah, for most businesses, if you're online, I would just go the podcast guesting route. And like I said, a lot of stuff will fall out from that. But as long as you're comfortable speaking and telling your story, obviously, this can grow like pretty much any type of business. Step one is literally to do that purpose step. It's really that simple. Don't worry about having a full system, a VA, sit down, think about what you would talk about on a podcast and why. Not even you don't have to worry about what first, who is your target market? So I always joke this first step, especially in a one on one setting. This could take 30 minutes or it could take 30 days. And it has a lot to do with how mature people are in their business. If they can't quickly articulate who their target market is, the before and after transformation that they provide to them, do they have a lead magnet or some way to be in touch with clients or potential clients once they've heard them on a partnership? There's those foundational business things. So it's kind of a trick question when you say, how do you get started? Well, if you've got all that done, then it's simply like going out and just finding your first podcast, writing your pitch email, the software Tim and I use. There's lots of tools. You can kind of get this kind of Ninja. But the foundational thing is to just go ask the first partner and get a yes. I guess it was a blessing and a curse. The first twelve pitches I made to be on fairly sizable podcast, I got yeses from all of them from a single cold pitch email. That was good because it showed me my emails were good, but it was bad because it made it seem too easy. And of course, since then, my hit rate is definitely not 100%, and it won't be. So I'm saying that. So if people do this and like the first three emails they send, they feel like they're not getting a response, or people say they're not interested. Don't be discouraged, because there's way more behind that who do want to hear you and you want to showcase you. And if it makes you feel more confident, go with a really small show for your first couple to where there's not a lot of people listening. So if you flutter and you feel like you're not doing a good job, it's not that big a deal. You can get some experience that way.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I want to get tactical on this question a little bit if you're listening or watching, and Podcast Guesting specifically is one of the partnership marketing tactics you want to use, I have a couple of things to add here, and then you may have some other stuff to add on top of this, Dustin. PodMatch and other similar sites, which are basically sites that connect hosts with guests. Awesome. When I initially started Guest podcasting, PodMatch didn't even exist. We were doing it cold. Pod Match makes it very easy. Our hit rates are better. We're not having to follow up as much. So sites like PodMatch are fantastic. We'll make sure that that gets in the show Notes. The other great place super targeted is Listen Notes. Have you ever used Listen Notes?

Dustin Riechmann
I'm going to write that down. I have definitely seen it, but it's been an accident. I'm Googling top whatever podcast for a client and then Listen Notes. A lot of times has that, especially a summary of.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Listen Notes, it's like Google search for podcasts.

Dustin Riechmann
Yeah, there you go.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And there's multiple subsections that you can do. But like, for example, I am a marketing coaching consultant. I want to get on other marketing podcasts. I can go into Listen Notes, type in marketing, and it lists out all the podcasts that are out there that are about marketing. I have now have a targeted list if I know that there are other people that I in my field, whatever. Let's just say Gary Vaynerchuk. Okay, this is not a realistic example for me, but let's say I know that the podcast Gary Vaynerchuk has been on, our podcast that I want to be on. I can just type in Gary Vaynerchuk and it shows me all the podcasts Gary Vaynerchuk has been on. And all of a sudden I'm like, okay, great, I got all these podcasts now that I can go look at. There's estimates of where they rank. Like, are you in the top 1%, top half percent? I don't know how accurate those are, but they're there. And it still gives you some benchmarks to kind of look at. Listen Notes is awesome. The other thing that I want to touch on that you said was about performing. I think a lot of people over think this where it's like, look, what do you want to be known for? Well, depending on which podcast you're on, you're either talking about ecommerce and helping build your ecommerce brand or you're talking about partnership marketing. But the reality is, if you're talking about partnership marketing, you're talking about the same thing each and every time. So we're not reinventing the wheel. When I jump on, what am I talking about? I talk about the marketing fundamentals because that's what we focus on. We help people get those in place. A lot of people don't talk about those. They get tactical. So that's what I want to be known for. That's what I talk about. I don't reinvent the wheel. It's very simple. I'm not having to do a ton of prep and neither are you for each of the episodes you're on, because you know exactly what you're going to talk about.

Dustin Riechmann
Exactly. That's an excellent point. That don't overthink things because people what would I ever talk about? I'm like, who are your clients? What transformation do you provide your clients? They're like, well, I'm a health coach. I'm like, well, you don't think there are a health coach for older women or whatever they think they're so niche that there's no podcast about that. I'm putting that in air quotes. Right. Do you think there are podcasts, though, that have a substantial number of women dealing with chronic illness listening? Of course there are. Right. There may not be a health podcast directly, but people in that stage of life listen to certain types of shows and you could be the featured expert on that one topic. Right. So, yeah, that's awesome. And I'm a huge fan of PodMatch, actually just got on there in January like a few months ago. It's really awesome. So it's large, which is great. It's a great database. It tends to be I would say I don't know your experience, Tim. A lot of small to medium type podcasts, but the number of reviews and things are right there. So you can quickly screen if you got a different target for a certain number of reviews. So it's awesome for that. So you're not going to find every show on there because not everyone is on there, but a lot of really good shows. And if you're wanting to get started and really get volume, that's like an excellent shortcut. And there's a process there, too, that's really valuable. And that the first thing you do is set up a bio page, biography page. Right. And so you have to think through like, what types of questions would I like to answer? How do I want someone to introduce me? What's my call to action? So if you haven't been through some of that work, it'll kind of force you to do that to get started, which I think is healthy. Listen Notes, awesome resource. And as you were talking about the kind of Gary Vee example, think of that. This is what I talked about earlier. If you're like three to five, there's a couple of more advanced techniques that build on that. So let's say I'm on Tim's show right now. So when this goes live, there's like what I would call the green room. So there's all these other guests that have interacted on the show with Tim. Well, I've got an immediate relational anchor. Like the first paragraph on my email is written because I can say, hey, man, I saw your episode with Tim. Tim's awesome. I was just on there recently. Well, now I've got immediate credibility because he's on that show. He must know what he's talking about. So that's one strategy is look at the list of all the other people who have been on that show, see which ones make sense for you to go. Approach for a relationship or partnership. The other thing I could do, I call it Follow the leader, is Tim likes to podcast guests. Most podcasts host also like to be on other shows. I can go Google Tim Fitzpatrick podcast and guess what? I'm going to find 20 shows he's been on. I can go to those hosts and be like, hey, I saw you interviewed Tim last year. Tim's an awesome guy. I was actually just on his show, and it made me think I should reach out and see if you have an interest in learning about partnership marketing for your audience. So I'm saying stuff goes like you got to do the work at the beginning and kind of get that foundation. But then it really does become a marketing flywheel. That may sound cheesy, but it kind of gets its own momentum as long as you consistently are doing those activities to kind of spread your reach.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love that example. So you're taking the connections that you have, and as you outreach to new people, you've got something that's relevant and pertinent to them to start to establish a connection immediately.

Dustin Riechmann
Absolutely. You have some coaches, consultants, consultants like people who would consider themselves, like, selling more of a high ticket service, typically like a one on one sales call. Well, I don't want to overwhelm people, but there's a lot here. But one of our more advanced techniques for those people wouldn't apply for, like. Well, it would apply in a different way for something like Fire Creek. And I'll explain that. But that same mindset with the green room. So let's say you're a coach and you coach marketing agency owners. I have just random examples. So I'm on a show that has entrepreneurial type theme. Right. Because I'm talking about partnership marketing. Well, then when that show goes live, I could go and look at all the previous guests. It would be a relatively small number, but I could basically screen because they have all this public information probably right in the show notes. Like, is this the type of person I usually like to work with that would buy my services? Are they cool? Is this, like, would they be my ideal client? And if you find five ideal clients who have been on someone's show in the past six months, it's an easy thing to reach out, start a conversation again. You've got a relational anchor right there. And I'm not saying go pitch. That's why I don't want people to take from this. I'm not saying go pitch everyone who's ever been on the same show, like with a cold one on one hard sale. But you can develop a relationship that certainly might turn into a high ticket sale for you. So the way I view that is like, every time I'm on a show, it's like a pond. I create a pond that I'm in all those other fish. There's a few that would be really good partners for me. That could mean partners like they buy my mastermind, they buy my services, they buy my coaching, or it could be like they become a referral partner. It's pretty rich. So for something like ecommerce, like selling a snack stick, that may not sound obvious, but what I've discovered and being on these shows is there are people that are buyers at Snack Nation that listen to a podcast or there are people who know those people like the introduction I got made to Walmart. So being out there, you don't know in the ether who's listening, but they will come out if they really like your story, they will shoot you emails, they will send you direct messages on LinkedIn and say, I heard you on the show, I really enjoyed it. And then you start up a conversation and it's just relationships, but you're building them at scale when you do it this way.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So we've talked a lot about guest podcasting, and I love how you've dug deeper here in some of the ways that we can really start to leverage guest podcasting. Just really quickly. What are some of the other, let's say guest podcasting is not something that I want to do. What are some of the other tactics within partnership marketing that people can take advantage of?

Dustin Riechmann
Yeah. So for an online business, there's traditional PR like radio, TV, newspaper, magazines, those sort of things. Those are ultimately partnerships. And it's very similar to a podcast. If you're not comfortable talking and your business is really about writing, like you could do guest blogging. Right. It's kind of an old school tactic, but it really works where you develop relationships and you feature your work on other people's platforms that way. So that can work really well, something like joint venture webinars. So if you have an education, if Tim had a big audience and he wanted to bring me on to, I could teach on like a webinar format about partnership marketing. And in that case, if we had a product, of course, to sell, we could share the proceeds of that course at the end as an affiliate. So that would be like a joint venture. There are virtual summits that this would same thing. You pitch the person who is the host of the summit to have you be one of the featured speakers. There actual stages, right there. A lot of times the way you get on those stages is by getting to build a relationship with the conference organizer or the person responsible for recruiting speakers. And you make a pitch and it's the same process, but you're doing physical stages. Referrals for complementary services would be another big one. So if someone's listening and they have an SEO agency, they don't do Facebook ads, if they go find or they hear someone on a podcast or whatever, develop those relationships for people who offer services that you don't. And hopefully you can refer work to each other because unless you're a full service agency, you probably have some specialties that others don't and vice versa. I'm kind of glancing over here because I have a list. And then Offline, someone asked me this the other day and I had to kind of formalize what I was thinking for Offline. So say you're a local business you're a brick and mortar. It could be a marketing agency, it could be a shoe store. Right. But that referral thing for complimentary services is huge. Like, my aunt's a realtor, and I feel like she's very successful. And a lot of her business is because she has relationships with painters, contractors, and so she refers business to them whenever someone needs to spruce up their house. But they're also members of the community and they talk about how awesome she is as a realtor. It's often not and maybe legally can't be monetary in that case. But it's that referral. Reciprocity. Reciprocity here, I got it. But if you're a local person too, if you're a local marketing firm, for example, go do lunch and learns, like, go host lunch and learn. Go talk about what you do. Whenever I was making that transition out of engineering, I didn't market anything. All I did was I started to talk about that. I knew this stuff, and then I had an interest in it. And so literally, I remember yesterday, I was in my dentist chair. We were kind of friends. We're not, like outside the practice. We had talked numerous times. I've been a long time client. And he said, hey, what do you mean up to dustin? And I said, actually, I'm thinking about leaving engineering. It's going to be a big jump. But I've really gotten into marketing lately. He said, oh, you know, marketing. Yes, I do Facebook ads and stuff for my other businesses. We should talk. He became my best client for almost two years until I quit doing hands on consulting work like that. And my realtor, not my aunt a different realtor became a client. I had a restaurant as a client because I went in there and talked to him. And then Ryan, my business partner for Fire Creek Snacks, he actually opened a third location of his local Butcher shop in town. I was in there. Long story short, I discovered him and the brand in there. I ended up working with him for six months. He paid me to market his brick and mortar stores. We developed a relationship and ultimately launched this Fire Creek Snacks brand. For anyone, including local businesses. Talk about what you do when you're out and about, and you would be amazed how many people want to help you and how many people want to hire you. Services.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Dustin, you've dropped and you've dropped some serious bomb. Yeah. People are going to have to rewatch or relisten to this. Any last minute thoughts you want to leave us with today?

Dustin Riechmann
I think in the context of I shared so much there quickly. Don't be overwhelmed. Keep it simple. My business is called Simple Success Coaching because most people that come to me feel stuck. They feel overwhelmed. There's a word that happens a lot, and it's like, I get it. Let's break it down. What's the next simple step? You could take to make you feel calm and feel like you're making progress. So that's it. If this is really resonating with you, of course you can go deep with this, work with us or whatever, and get a system actually installed to actually do this with you for you. So that's cool. But if you're like, you want to dabble in it, that's cool, too. Here's a really easy tip. You're listening to the show because you probably listen to other podcasts, too. If there's any podcast, look at your podcast player. If there's any podcast who you already listened to, who you think you could add value to, start there because you already know the host, you could probably write a relational anchor in your sleep. If you listen to more than a couple of episodes, you probably know about a little bit about the personal life and that sort of thing. So start there. Start with the familiar. If you don't know what else to do, hit your first podcast guest, get on there, tell your story. Have fun with it. Be cool to the host, help them out. When it comes to leaving a review and you'll start creating momentum and the sky is the absolute limit with this stuff.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Where can people learn more about you? Justin, I know you've got a call to action.

Dustin Riechmann
I got a call to action. I got to do that or I look like a fool. There's a partnership marketing blueprint I put together. It's like a really simple four video thing to go through each of the four steps that I talked about with a lot of examples. So someone wants to get started on their own. That's totally free, and it's on our website, so it's simplesssuccesscoaching.com/partner. If you just go to Simplesssuccesscoaching.com, it's like partnership marketing 101 at the top. That's the same thing. I also do free strategy calls. I screen those pretty heavily, so there's a short application to make sure I know I can actually help you on the call, but I built my whole one on one coaching practice from people asking me questions. I get on a call. I'm really big on 90 day action plans. And so my thing is I create those with people for free. Like we'll get on a call, I'll hear you out here where you're stuck, and we'll decide together on a great 90 day action plan for you, and then that's yours. And then people who want help implementing it are being held accountable to it, then that's who they become coaching clients. But it's just to help them implement a plan. So that's it. So feel free to reach out. I am like an open book. My email address is just dustin@simplesuccesscoaching.com, I welcome any of your listeners to reach out with questions if they get still stuck in any way. I'd love to help.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. Dustin, thank you so much, man. I really appreciate this. I've enjoyed this conversation tremendously. So thank you for that. People, if you're at all interested in partnership marketing just head on over to simplesuccesscoaching.com to take advantage of that. Thank you guys so much for watching and listening and appreciate you. Again I'm Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. If you guys want access to the 90-day marketing plan template that we use for business and our clients you can head on over to growthmarketingplan.com. All the resources you need there to put your marketing plan together in minutes and start getting results are there so please take advantage of that. If you want to chat with us you need further clarity on what your next step should be to get where you want to go you can always head on over to our website at RialtoMarketing.com and click get a free consult button so thank you guys so much. Till next time. Take care.


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