How To Use Professional Video To Market And Grow Your Business

April

21

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Are you using video to market your business. If not, I think you should. Using video is a great way to connect with people and help differentiate your business from the rest of the pack. Our special guests today, Joe and Emma from Chezy , run a video production company. We are going to talk all about how to use professional video to market and grow your business.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick, Joe Tjosvold, and Emma McIntyre for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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How To Use Professional Video To Market And Grow Your Business

Tim Fitzpatrick
Are you using video to market and grow your business? If not, I think you should, using video is a great way to connect with people and help differentiate your business from the rest of the pack. Our special guests, plural, today, run a video production company, and we are going to talk all about how to use professional video to market and grow your business. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult and you must remove your revenue roadblocks to accelerate growth. I want to thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. I am super excited to have Joe and Emma from Chezy with me today. Welcome, guys, and thanks for being here.

Emma McIntyre
All right. Thanks so much, Tim.

Joe Tjosvold
Yeah, thank you, Tim.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. So it's always a little interesting. Very rarely do I have multiple guests, so this is going to be cool. This is going to be fun. We're going to start off with some rapid fire questions. I don't care which one of you guys answers. If both of you guys want to answer, totally cool, too. So you ready to rock?

Joe Tjosvold
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Joe Tjosvold
Watching soccer.

Emma McIntyre
Community building events.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And what's your hidden talent?

Joe Tjosvold
Kicking a football far.

Emma McIntyre
I can do whistle tones when I sing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I like that. What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Joe Tjosvold
It's never as bad as it is. Never as good as it is.

Emma McIntyre
You can't be what you can't see, so surround yourself with those that are where you want to get to.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Joe Tjosvold
I'm very quiet.

Emma McIntyre
I was a cleaner kid in high school.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What does success mean to you?

Joe Tjosvold
Freedom of time, maximizing time.

Emma McIntyre
A rising tide lifts all ships.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Joe Tjosvold
On a sailboat on Lake Superior.

Emma McIntyre
With my dog.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What kind of dog?

Emma McIntyre
He's a rescue. He's a German Shepherd mix.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, I got one of those. All black and 80, 85 pounds. He's a

Emma McIntyre
A beast.

Tim Fitzpatrick
He's fun. What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Joe Tjosvold
Loyalty.

Emma McIntyre
Lifelong learners.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. You guys rocked it. You guys did that quicker than most people when it's just one person. So you guys did an awesome job. So tell me more about what you guys are doing at Chezy before we jump into talking about professional video.

Emma McIntyre
Yeah, Joe.

Joe Tjosvold
So Chezy is a video production company that is driven by technology. And really what we aim to do is maximize efficiency. And when we maximize efficiency, we're able to have a lot more affordable cost. So Chezy exists because video production in the past has been extremely expensive for a small business to accomplish. So they usually don't do it or they use their phones. So we wanted to provide a solution for a cost effective way to not only get one video, but get a year's worth of video content for their marketing platform. Emma, do you have anything more to add?

Emma McIntyre
No, I think that was pretty all encompassing of the key pieces.


Tim Fitzpatrick
So let's dig into your approach. You guys are doing it differently, which allows you to bring those costs down. What's your approach? Let's dig into that.

Joe Tjosvold
All right, Emma, it's your turn.

Emma McIntyre
Okay. I think a lot of it circles down to what Joe had mentioned originally. Absolutely being obsessed with efficiency. We have something that we call the Chezy Value Equation that drives all of our research and development. What it's defined as, value for our team is continually lowering our price point, continually increasing the quality of the product that we're providing, increasing the quantity of the product we're providing, and making it as easy to use as we possibly can. So historically, when people want to accomplish a video project, they're forced to put all their eggs in one basket and to mostly because of budgetary reasons. Having one video that they have to decide, Okay, are they focusing on branding? Are they focusing on promotion? Are they focusing on hiring? And something that we're able to accomplish by trying to be as efficient as we can in preproduction, on shoot day and in postproduction is that we can help them hit a range of needs at once and be more of an all encompassing video solution.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And when we talk about preproduction, production, postproduction, preproduction is the planning ahead of time. Production is the actual video shooting, and then postproduction is where you take that footage and do all the editing.

Emma McIntyre
Right on the nose.

How to Know When You should Use Professional Video?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. When we talk about professional video versus not, let's define that for people so they can get as much value from this conversation as possible. How do you view professional versus just, I'm shooting on my phone, and when is it okay to use my phone? And when should I really be thinking about doing professional production?

Joe Tjosvold
Yeah. I see no problem in using your phone for some styles of video. So you have a simple announcement that you want to make on social media. There is no reason why you should be hiring a production crew to come in and shoot that video because it's also going to take a lot of time for that production crew. So just using your phone for some live announcement is really all you need. But when you step into some larger brand assets like a brand storytelling video and having that on your website or pinned to the top of your social media page, that's something that should be a well thought out art piece. And I know Emma has more information when you're comparing. I know Google's going through the files and saying this is a quality video versus this is a phone or whatnot. Do you want to share more about what you've learned recently?

Emma McIntyre
Yeah, absolutely. And we talk a lot about timeliness versus timelessness of content. Obviously, I mean, we've worked with Realtors, for example. If they're selling a house, the market's been moving so fast that it's not feasible. Like, Joe had said for us to come in, make a feature video, and then to share. It's probably better for them to do a live stream video straight to their Facebook page so they can engage with their audience right away. Now, where the timelessness factor is important is perhaps I mean, so much business happens over the Internet now, which is why we love video because we know that websites that have video content on them get higher engagement. And a part of that is due to what Joe had been saying previously about Google's changing a bit of their SEO strategy where video that is higher quality is actually getting bumped up in SEO. And that's based on what resolution is the video downloaded in, what engagement does it get, how long do people sit and watch through the duration of that content.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that. Timeliness versus timelessness. So when we're thinking about timeliness, that's where it's okay to just shoot on your phone. Most social media video stuff, frankly, I think should be done on your phone. It just shows a lot more realness, I guess, for lack of a better term.

Emma McIntyre
Authenticity.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, authenticity. Whereas timelessness, when you have videos that are more for branding, things that aren't going to change all the time, that's where somebody going to the homepage your site, they don't want to watch a video that looks like it wasn't done professionally. It's not a good look.

Emma McIntyre
Exactly. And it ties a lot to trust building. So if you're thinking about strategizing thought leadership content, yes, absolutely. There are those one offs where you hit the more timely pieces of content that you cover as a content expert. But there are things that are standalone. If we're talking about 5G Internet and you want to set yourself apart in the industry, you make a really killer video about 5G Internet that is high quality, high resolution, well done. That is an immediate trust builder with your audience.

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The Top Ways Businesses can Use Professional Video to Grow

Tim Fitzpatrick
How do you want your brand to be positioned? We started to touch on this a little bit. What are some of the top ways businesses can use professional video to market and grow?

Emma McIntyre
Joe, I don't know if you have anything comes to mind right away.

Joe Tjosvold
Yeah. So when we work with clients, they're getting multiple styles of video for different avenues. So we can create lead generation advertising videos for social media. But then once they're to your landing page, what does that longer form video look like? That's really going to maybe share a client testimonial about your product or service. From there, they're in your process working with you. What explainer videos do you have to explain how everything works? So it's really well received and understood of how your process or approach works. So there's so many videos that we complete. And not only that, but then also on the hiring side as well, showcasing your culture and all of that. So basically, how many problems can we solve with video? It is really the big question that we have when we're meeting with a potential client is, what are you going through? What does 2023 look like for you and the goals that you have? So what else do you have to add with that, Emma?

Emma McIntyre
Yeah, we spend a lot of time problem solving. So the product that we offer is really unique in the fact that we are providing so much video content at once that sometimes when we have initial conversations with potential customers, they're overwhelmed by the idea of planning 15 to 20 videos in one sitting. And it's really as simple as, okay, is your organization struggling with hiring? Are you struggling with branding? Are you struggling to get the trust built with your customers? So then we focus more on thought leadership. I think the professional side of video, like Joe had said, allows us to create funnels of, Okay, how do we catch them? How do we educate them? How do we get them eventually having onboarding of a customer.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What about testimonials? Client testimonials? You do you do those too?

Joe Tjosvold
I love them. I would say that's the backbone of the majority of our clients' video plans. There's a lot of testimonials.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Testimonial. I mean, it's one thing to have it written, but it's a totally different experience when it's in video because people actually see it. They're like, Oh, my gosh. This person's actually real. I love that. We've talked about testimonials, brand storytelling videos, HR videos about culture, explainer videos. Then depending on the specific problems that they have, there may be other videos that start to come to the surface. You guys do that upfront in the preproduction process, really identifying what the deal is, what videos they need, and then that helps put the plan together of what needs to happen in production.

Emma McIntyre
Yeah. Absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
But I think the thing that's so cool about what you guys are doing is it's not just one video. Frankly, I think it's hard to get traction with just one video. I think you need multiple and you need to think about the entire process.

Emma McIntyre
Yes. And there are certain things that we do to leverage, making sure, yes, we're making a lot of videos, but we want them to also be high impact. So how can we ensure that the videos are shorter? They grab attention faster from potential viewers. How do we make them authentic? So that way we focus on more of an interview based format. So you're creating that authenticity because what video does is it's a direct look into the individuals in your organization because at the end of the day, and I think this is where business professionals leverage LinkedIn is because you're not just sharing who your business is, you're sharing the people that exist in it because you buy into people in most cases. You're not always buying into brands. So by doing more of those testimonial interview style videos, you're showcasing directly who your organization is, how what sets it apart. Joe and I actually initially met because I was in event planning, so I was running one of our community's events called TEDx Fargo. So a 2000 person event that happens in downtown Fargo. And Joe made this killer video for us to use for promotion. And so often it was tickets for that event were $100. And it was really hard to convince people to spend the money and invest in themselves that way. But by showing them this video and having them fully understand what the day was encompassing, that we had artists and performers, that there was artisanal food, and that video showcased all of that, it made it so much easier to turn over ticket sales with an actual visual representation of the work that we were doing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, it sold the event for you.

Emma McIntyre
Yes, exactly.

The Common Mistakes and Pitfalls People Make with Professional Video

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love that. So what are some of the most common mistakes pitfalls people make with professional video?

Emma McIntyre
This is all you, Joe.

Joe Tjosvold
I would say it's the messaging. You got to put yourself in the viewer's shoes and understand that they really don't care about your success. When you're in front of the screen and you're just bragging about your business, it's just not received well. They don't care how successful you are. They don't care if you own a restaurant and you go out of business, they're just going to go to the next business. It doesn't matter. So how do you put the story together in a solid way to where you're the guide, you are not the hero of the story. Your customers, your clients are the hero. Tell their story. And that's why we lean so heavily into client testimonials is because they are the hero. Let them tell their success story using your service. And I think that is a big thing of why a lot of videos don't work is because just people don't... They simply don't care. They want their most important part of the story is like me. So make them the hero.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You're speaking my language, Joe. As a marketing consultant and outsource fractional chief marketing officer, all of the stuff we start with is with strategy, which is all around who are your ideal clients, the target markets that you're serving, and then what message do you need to have to attract and engage those people. You hit the nail on the head. They just don't. They care about themselves. They care about themselves. They help them get from where they are to where they want to be. Another way that... I can't remember where I heard this. I think it was Dove Gordon said people care about the problems that they have and don't want and the results they want and don't have. Our message needs to focus on those things. We're only talking about ourselves enough to establish that credibility, that authority, but the rest of it needs to be focused on the clients and the people we need to attract. If you don't know who your ideal clients are, you got to figure that out because then you're never going to be able to create a message that's going to attract those people. So it all starts there. Then you've got the message. Once you've got the message, then it makes your job putting those videos together much easier and much more effective.

Joe Tjosvold
Yup.

Emma McIntyre
Could be a good segue to, I think, another common mistake that people make is not identifying where the video is going to live prior to the creation of it. So we get a lot of requests to spend a lot of time pushing people towards shorter videos because we know they have increased engagement. We're not necessarily on a mission to create 7 minute long forms of content because they just don't get as much follow through unless it's on this platform where it's a podcast, education, sharing. But the way that videos are formatted based on the customer that you're trying to reach is something that we spend a lot of time explaining to customers that have never maybe necessarily worked with video content before.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. What I'm hearing both of you guys say is the strategy side of it, the planning is key. That's got to happen first before you just start jumping in and shooting video. You've got to think about that. Then you can start to jump in and take action. But without the right strategy and plan, you're going to waste a lot of time and a lot of money on videos that aren't going to be very effective.

Joe Tjosvold
Yeah. I'm constantly on a war with art. I mean that because as a business owner, I'm not trying to buy, let's just call it a $10,000 piece of art that does nothing besides just hang on my wall. If I'm going to invest $10,000, $20,000 into something, I do want to see a return on that. So don't just give art. There's also that strategy and intent behind the art. And I also think that's more so a common mistake when it comes to video production companies and their mentality as well.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I also love what you said, Emma, too, about you got to think about where these are going to live because most people are not watching five, 10 minute videos. They're just not taking the time to do that. So we've got to think about where we're going to put them and just hit people with the information that they really need in a shorter period of time. Do you guys think that there's a sweet spot with video in that regard?

Emma McIntyre
Yeah, I think it's complex because it depends on video type. Brand storytelling video, who you are, what you do, what sets you apart, two to three minutes. Educational content, I think is really great when it's in that one to two minute period because if you're just sharing information at somebody... That's why TikTok works so well because we have short attention spans and we are getting even shorter attention spans. A part of our job is to help our clients figure out how to adapt to that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it. It's been a great conversation. There's a couple of things I want to just pull out that I think I just want to highlight again. Because, Emma, one of the things you said about thinking about video from a timeliness versus timelessness standpoint, I think that is a great measuring stick to think about when you are trying to decide, Is this professional video that I need, or can I just use my phone and put it out there? If it's timeliness, use your phone, get it out there. If it's timelessness, you really need to start considering professional video. That's one of the biggest takeaways that I have from this. But the other thing, too, that you guys share that I think is really important is just thinking about the planning up front. What are the biggest problems that we have that we're trying to solve and how can we use video to do that, and which videos do we need in order to do that?

Conclusion: How To Use Professional Video To Market And Grow Your Business

Tim Fitzpatrick

Any other last minute thoughts you guys have?

Emma McIntyre
Joe?

Joe Tjosvold
What do you got, Emma?

Emma McIntyre
So many thoughts.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, share them. Please don't be bashful.

Emma McIntyre
On our team, we've been talking about AI and how does the evolving of AI? How do we position ourselves to still showcase the value that we provide? And I think the biggest thing for us is faces. You know, based on statistics, that videos and photos with faces on them get higher engagement on social media. And so what sets us apart from just created AI, just AI generated content of videos of stock footage people edit together to showcase their product or showcase their team are still missing that human aspect. And I think in the last three years, we've craved human connection, which is further showcased in that statistic that makes us get better engagement. So I think that's probably where I'm so passionate about Chezy and Joe, I don't know if you have anything to add on to that. But even with the rise of AI, the work that we're doing is still so necessary for making sure that the messages that organizations share are effective and having effective video.

Tim Fitzpatrick
AI doesn't do strategy at this point.

Emma McIntyre
Exactly. And it's such a human... The other thing that I think sets apart Chezy and Joe, you design the process. I mean, you can talk more to this. But when you sign up to work with our team, you are assigned a video director. They do the preproduction, they help schedule all your interviewees, they are there on shoot day and they edit your content. So they have an incredibly impressive overall view of the work that you're doing. And to the credit of these individuals, they are not only technically very talented, but they are so personable and they make people feel so comfortable in front of the camera. So I think when we talk about our Chezy value equation where, yes, we're trying to lower our price. Yes, we're trying to increase quality. Yes, we're trying to increase quantity. The people side of our process is really reassuring to the fact that Luke and Alyssa, our director team, have created 1,500 videos in the last year. Think of all the individuals they've interviewed. And some of the continual feedback we get is people leave their shoot day feeling really comfortable having still sat in front of a camera under the big lights because we try to maintain that human side of video. Even though we are a video technology company. Yes, we're leveraging technology. I think anybody's naive to not. But yeah, that's what makes me so heated and optimistic about the process that you designed, Joe.

Joe Tjosvold
Yeah. Well, I appreciate that. Yeah, I think the process that we have and that continues to be refined, not by only me, but by our entire team. We get to focus on things that other video production more traditional approaches do not focus on. And it's like Emma said, it's really like we're hiring for personality for our director team, not necessarily their technical ability because we'll teach them what they need to know. Our leadership team has multi award winning videographers from our parent company. We will put them through our own training process that we call Chezy University. And we're going... Alyssa, for example, was a communications major. She was not a video production major. So we hire for personality. We hire to make sure our directors can connect well with our clients. And that really matters when they sit down for an interview because it is a very intimidating process sometimes. So I think it allows us to focus on different things. And I think that's really cool.

Emma McIntyre
And different industries that never have thought probably about video for problem solving. So we spend a lot of time in manufacturing, helping them tell their stories. Which I mean, if you think of one of our clients is a transportation company. It's a bunch of really lovely individuals that are managing and helping us solve the supply chain crisis across the US. But they don't necessarily enjoy sitting in front of a camera and talking about why they love their job. And you look at pictures of shoot days from behind the scenes, and they're having a blast. It's an honor to help tell this individual story. And I think that we treat each person that sits in the interview chair as such, which adds to the final quality of the video.

Tim Fitzpatrick
People like what we've talked about. They like your philosophy. I love just your process. Where can they learn more about you guys?

Joe Tjosvold
Yeah. So chezy.com, CHEZY.com is our website. We are based in Fargo, North Dakota. However, we have worked on projects from the West Coast to the East Coast and everywhere in between. Because most of our projects only have one day of shooting, you can always add on days, but that allows us to travel wherever, do the shoot day and come back and work on the entire postproduction remotely. We would love to have a conversation. There's a book a call button and you can speak directly with Emma McIntyre here to learn a little bit more and go through the full demo of how our Chezy process works.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. I love it. Joe, Emma, thank you for taking the time. I really appreciate it. Those of you watching, listening, go check out Chezy CHEZY.com. Thank you guys for being here. I really appreciate it. Those of you that are watching, listening, thank you for doing so. We've been talking about video production, which, gosh, falls into multiple revenue roadblock areas. I think messaging, target market, lead generation. If you want to find out which of the nine revenue roadblocks are slowing down your growth, go over to revenueroadblockscorecard.com. You can also always connect with us over at rialtomarketing.com as well. Thank you for watching, listening. Appreciate you and until next time, take care.

Joe Tjosvold
Thank you, guys.

Emma McIntyre
Thank you so much, Tim.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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