How To Win More Deals By Specializing

Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Brian Terrell for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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How To Win More Deals By Specializing

Tim Fitzpatrick
Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a Revenue Acceleration Series interview where we talk to seven-figure B2B professional service from owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe you must remove your revenue roadblocks if you want to accelerate growth, and marketing shouldn't be difficult. I am super excited to have Brian Terrell from GPL Technologies with me today. Brian, welcome. Thanks for being here.

Brian Terrell
Hey, thank you for having me, Tim. I've been looking forward to this conversation for about a month now.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, me too. So really quickly, you got an awesome background there. I know your company is based out of Southern California, but you are not.

Brian Terrell
I spent a lot of time in Costa Rica.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Brian Terrell
Started coming here with my family 10 years ago, and we got more serious about six years ago about spending some real time here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, very cool. So just tell us very quickly, Brian, what do you do? How long have you been doing it?

Brian Terrell
I'm the CEO of GPL Technologies and VFX Now. I founded the companies in 2003. They were officially incorporated in 2004. October makes our 20 year anniversary officially, according to the documents. And I'm so happy. My day to day. Today is CEO. I have a president in each company. I started off my career by being an engineer. Then I learned to do sales, and then I learned how to be an executive. So I went all the way up the ladder in my own companies.

Tim Fitzpatrick
There you go. I love it. Well, 20 years is a huge milestone. You're obviously doing something right. So in those 20 years, what's the most important lesson you've learned?

Brian Terrell
Never give up. When I first read that, it said, If you don't quit, you don't fail. And I don't have a lot of natural talent outside of being kind to people and my customers. And just not giving up.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. It's one of my favorite quotes, and I'm trying to remember who it's from, but it's just never, never, never give up. So I love it.

Brian Terrell
No, not at all.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So So speaking of quotes, mantras, we all know growing a business is hard work. Do you have any mantra or motivational saying that you say to yourself, share with your team, when you guys run up against those hurdles and those roadblocks?

Brian Terrell
Absolutely. So I have a mantra that I say to myself, which is today is going to be a nice, boring day when I wake up. And that's what I want to do, especially when things are going really wrong. I'm like, how can we make today a nice, boring day? And then for my team, what I learned, and we've nearly gone bankrupt a handful of times. Every business does. I mean, you're really threading the needle as you build a business that's not venture-backed or no outside funding. And so what I do is I use the traffic light analysis with my team. I'm like, all right, we're in the red today. We want to finish up these items. That's going to put us in the yellow. We're going to then finish these items, and that's going to put us back in the green. So it's a lot of hard work today, but we cannot sustain this forever. So we're going to start layering down some real easy wins, and that's going to put us back in the green. And so ultimately, we want the business to run by the numbers. We don't want it to be thrashing, and we don't want too much excitement. And quite frankly, I think things are typically more easy than we believe them to be. It's just we're caught up in the day to day.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I think it's easy to But when you get caught up in the day to day and everything that's going on, right? It's just information overload, and it's so easy to become overwhelmed. One of my mentors said to me a long time ago, and it's always stuck with me, is just focus on the next measurable step, which I have always found super helpful when we're in that place of, oh, my God, there's so much stuff coming at us.

Serving a Very Interesting Niche

Tim Fitzpatrick
One of the things that I found super interesting about your experience, Brian, is you're in an interesting niche and specialization. Can you share that with us? What the niche is and how that whole thing came about?

Brian Terrell
Absolutely. So the niche that we're in is supporting creative workflows, and there's creativity in every company. Our focus is from the Hollywood studios. You have the creation of content. And then you have an ecosystem of vendors, VFX houses, postproduction houses, and others that work with these really high-rich media formats. A lot of our story systems will be because of that in the petabyte level. So it's this massive amount of data. And that's a big part of what we do. In addition to that, if you look at any of the advertisements, there's another pyramid of different advertising agencies. And within those agencies, there's another ecosystem of vendors that often overlap, to be honest. People do commercial episodic long form. And so there's another. And they have a very similar workflow. And that's been really great. And then we have what we'll call a third sector of customers, and that's the Fortune 2000. There's not a large company, and the Fortune 2000 doesn't have a media department. Within that media department, they're generating lots of ads in-house, and they're using very similar workflows. And so what our job is, is to go in and assess what the religion is of this company. If we disagree with it, we can talk about it once we've listened and we understand what we're talking about. And then oftentimes, they will ask us for ways that they can improve, and then we'll try to be very strategic in our recommendations to make sure that we don't actually break their workflow, that we actually understand why they do things they do. And then we go on and help them improve and take a measured approach.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you're helping companies that have a lot of creative data that they're creating and how to manage that, how to secure it. You're also You're also leasing and renting equipment that they use within that process as well, correct?

Brian Terrell
Absolutely. And so what we wanted to do was to be a single source for everything they need to create their project, whether that's a feature film. We got to work with some of the Hollywood studios to do a lot of the major releases. We're always under NDA, so I can't save names, but we work with almost all the studios. And within the studios, you'll have a 30 person team, and they'll be working on the aggregate, aggregating all the content from the various vendors. And then they'll put those together. And that's when they begin to deposit everything, take all the different shots, work with the vendors, make sure that the shots are consistent. And so what we do is we provide tools. Sometimes they'll have thousands of shots. So we use Autodesk shot And we have customized software that we pair with the software from Autodesk that enables the vendors to communicate very efficiently and save a lot of time in-house. Because if you're trying to track thousands of shots, there's nothing worse than working on the wrong shot under the wrong directions, wasting time. And time is the most important asset we have, especially in movie making and creative.

Tim Fitzpatrick
How did you settle on this? I mean, it's really a specialization, right? You specialize in helping creative companies manage the process and all the data. That's right. It seems like your specialization in that process and all the intricacies of it dictates the industries that you tend to work with. Is that right? Or was it the other way around?

Brian Terrell
No. I was hanging out with creative people, and they were bringing me into these facilities. And then I learned what a 10K was, and I read IBM's 10K, which allowed me to see that they were afraid of losing the niche competitors in different verticals. I knew that if I niche down, I would win more deals than if I tried to go broad. And when we're competing on deals because of our special visualization in the history, we have real veterans on the team that's been 30, 40 years in the industry and not aggregate hours. They've actually earned their late '50s and '60s, and they've actually been working since the '80s. And we have younger people as well that come from the industry. And when we're talking with people, we know their jobs, not as well as they know them these days, but we know them really well and we understand their challenges. And when I was founding the company 20 years ago, I would be working shoulder to shoulder with the teams until 4:00 AM. I would then wake up and be back at 10:00, and I'd work again until 4:00 on deliveries. So we know them really well. And that allows the trust factor to go way up. When we first meet them, as soon as we start talking about production problems from the trenches, they know we put our time in and that they can trust us.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So all of us in the US know that last year there was writer strikes, there was the actor strikes. That obviously had an impact on your business. And one of the things that as marketers, when we tell people to niche down or specialize, one of the first objections people have is, I'm putting all my eggs in one basket. You've been in the same basket for a long a long time. What would you say to those people? I mean, do you regret making that decision?

Brian Terrell
There is an understanding now that, first of all, I'll address what happened, and then we can talk about how to grow out of it. What happened was, as I described earlier, we have the studios, we have episodic advertising, and then we have Fortune 2000. Well, it just happened that on VFX Now, the revenue was harmed about 33 %. And that's due to VFX Now just not having the studios. And then what happened was the studios stopped making new content last year. And really, what people don't really understand from the outside is that the strike started in May June, but the studios are very sharp, and they delayed production starting in January. So what happened was that when I looked at my books, I could see certain lines of business. So we have five, and I could see two lines of business begin to dwindle in January, the ones that deal with the productions coming online. And then I began to watch them wayne, heavily starting in June. And then I could see the momentum slow down to December. Luckily, we're on the backside and things are picking up. Now, GPL had a record year. We had a great year. We crushed it. Best year ever. Vfx now took a small hit. And so the The Revenue from GPL will work with to help bolster VFX now. And that's what it is. So what I learned is to have a new industry. We're pushing 20 million. And so we're big enough now that we can add on a new industry. And what it takes is the identification of a star for sales and then a star for engineering. And if there's not a star in each of those roles, the initiative will fail. And I've moved into territories like Vancouver and failed. I've had some success in New York. I've had some success Toronto. But really, unless there's a star team on the ground with the book of business, it's incredibly hard to start. I believe a lot of larger companies will make an acquisition into a market to capture a team or to partner with a team, and then they can go to market. And I think the ramp time is reduced by three to five years. It's still hard to start a new market organically. It's like running a startup.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you're looking at diversifying by expanding into other markets at this point?

Brian Terrell
We are looking at retrenching in the current market, ensuring that everything comes back to the way it does. And then when we go into a new market or a new vertical, I'll make a decision then. But most of the production, we are in London, we are in Europe, we are in foreign markets, and those markets did continue. But I believe that it would have to be another vertical if we really wanted to diversify. I don't think we're going to have another strike for 10 years. I don't think this is going to happen again. We'll just have to wait and see. Right now, we're so busy just catching up with pent-up demand. I mean, best case is there's so much pent-up demand. It'd be like 2021 where we just tripled. And I don't count 2021 as our best year because I look at it as an anomaly. It was like so much pent-up demand for 2020 that when we had easy money, we had all the PPP loans for the businesses, everybody was paying their bills on time. Everybody was expanding. Everybody was growing. So that's a once in a lifetime. When we look at what we expect our normal run rate business to be, that's going to be more like 2022, 2019. And the funny thing is that we've been in so many storms now since 2020. Now it's 2024 with the strike. I almost don't know what normal looks like. We've grown so much. We have 50 people in seven countries. So I'm like, everything changing so fast that I'm almost given up on what my baseline is.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. You said this earlier, right? There's being in very narrow, vertical. There's some risk there. But you touched on this earlier. You said niching down has won you more deals, right? And so...

Brian Terrell
Absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Would your business be in the same place it is today had you not niche down initially? Probably not.

Brian Terrell
No. I'm a big fan of true methods. I don't know if you guys are familiar with true methods, and I love Gary Pica, but the biggest disagreement with Gary Pica is he doesn't niche down nor recommend it. He's looking for managed service customers. And the problem is that the efficiencies are gained because we have experts in the field. And also we believe in selling hardware and software and services on top of it. And that gives us an overall bigger number, the ability to hire better talent. If I was just trying to do managed services for small businesses, I would be one of these one or $2 million MSPs. Maybe I hit $5 million. It'll be a nice, boring business, but I wouldn't have the lifestyle I have. The problem that we always ran into at GPL is that my CTO and I have to make our lifestyle work out of the business. And then people have been with me now for 10 plus years. Their salary requirements are quite high. So we these very, very expensive people that are over 200K. And we have to make the payroll. So it's only possible to have niche where we're really dealing with a certain type of customer to be able to go after all corporate infrastructure, we can recreate the niche. But the niche I would have recreated was like, we are a VMware shop and we're really good at VMware. And we have a data center architect and we only do VMware. This is us. And then this is someone else over here. And we partner with the Cisco shop. We partner with the IBM shop. And that's another way. It doesn't have to be a line of business. It can be by architecture or technology they support. But the challenge is that if I had a true engineering company, and then they have to understand the engineering line of businesses. And when those people come, they're going to make a lot of the purchasing decisions. And so they're going to want to compete. They're going to want to go with somebody who understands their line of businesses.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I want to pull something out that you just said because I think it's easy for people to overlook. Specializing in an industry vertical is not the only way to specialize in niche, right? As you said, Hey, I could be in the IT space. You could be a VMware specialist or Microsoft 365 specialist, whatever it may be. The reality is there's risks no matter what you choose to do. So you've got to look at what those risks are, what the downside to those risks are, and make your choice. But in the MSP space, and frankly, the managed service provider space is no different than any other professional service space. If you go broad with the market you serve, you still have to find other ways to differentiate. And so many MSPs struggle with that, and they're not getting traction because they're the same as everybody else. And when you're the same as everybody else, you compete on price. You know exactly where you fit, and you know exactly what that language is. You know exactly how to communicate to your ideal clients, which is why you're winning more business. And is there a risk? Yeah, but you got a $20 million business rather than a two. So the problems become larger. But hey, there's a risk either way. So thank you for sharing that and unpacking that a bit, because I think a lot of people have struggles around that.

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Marketing is a Long-term Investment

Tim Fitzpatrick

I want to shift gears a little bit, Brian, and talk a little bit about your marketing team. Your marketing team is all in-house, and frankly, with your marketing team in-house or outsource, there's no right or wrong answer. I just like to get an idea of how did you settle on going in-house, and how is your internal team set up at this point?

Brian Terrell
Sure. I had thought about this a lot, and I was reading Jeff Bezos' book. It has all of his annual reports going back to the beginning. And it's great. I can't remember the name of the book, but it's worth reading. It's every one of his annual reports. And in that, he talks about, how long does it take to do a handstand? I How long does it take to... If you were to learn to do a handstand, how long would that take you?

Tim Fitzpatrick
I have no idea.

Brian Terrell
Most people think you can learn a handstand in two weeks, but that's simply not true. So statistically speaking, the average person learns to do a handstand in six months. And so marketing is that same journey. And this is exactly from the book. This is of my thinking. This is from his thinking in marketing. And so when you're doing marketing, I used to give up. I would have a guy. And it's so laughable that once I read this, I finally got the light bulb. Joe and marketing isn't enough to do all the activities at the cadence and the quality necessary that it will be meaningful. It's like if I had one guy with no real training trying to build a sales team just off of a phone. If I got the right guy, I've seen guys like that work magic, but it's really hard. Most of them fail. It's just the truth. And the same for marketing. Most marketing people are just like a cold collar, and most of them fail. They don't have the ability to articulate the vision of what a marketing team should be. And whenever somebody is gifted, like Tim, and he tries to articulate what a marketing team should be, the owner say, well, I can't afford that. And then you have this chicken and the egg. It's necessary. I can't afford that. And that's for Tim to give the formula because I don't have it. I just I have a lot of grit. For me, what I did was I took the 2020 money and I just started lighting it on fire. I spent $40,000 a month for a lot of months. I hired a guy out of Mexico City for not much money. He was a CMO, graduated from Columbia Business School in Marketing, and he did what he could. I realized that one man doing what he can just isn't enough. Then we hired a lady out of Atlanta And that wasn't enough. And then we hired... We parted ways with the lady out of Atlanta. Then we hired two people in Mexico City. Then we started generating content. But if you're using foreign help, I'm just going to give a very transparent answer here, right? For everybody to hopefully learn. And if you have non-English speaking people doing your editing and they don't have the self control to ask the executive team to review the material before putting out in the world, it's going to be littered with errors and misspellings. Now, instead of selling, they're anti-selling, and they're damaging the company's reputation, and that's horrible. What we did is we switched out management. I brought in that gentleman out of Southern California who was amazing. He got our website. If you go to gpltech.com, he finished that one up, fixed the vfxnow.com website. The gentleman who designed both websites was one of my best clients, and it was going away gift for me. And I do appreciate what he did. So the sites were designed by artists. And this guy cleaned it up. I hired someone in Costa Rica. He was the next fat from Tennessee. And she's doing great. And eventually we did hit the cost barrier, where there's too much money going into marketing. Our client acquisition costs were $4,500 a client. A lead was $1,250 a client from AdWords. And that's comprised not of a way to make a KPI look good. It's based on the amount of money spent that month to generate the lead by the number of leads. This isn't ad spend on Google was $4,000 for the month. We're going to divide it out. And it's not like that at all. I have different numbers for that. So what's happened is that we had to fire the more senior person, and I regret it that. But I don't regret it, but I had to do it. It was one of these really hard decisions that he's a wonderful man. He did a great job for us. He worked as hard as he could, but I needed to go in a different direction. And so now we have Sarah, one of our... And she's running marketing. She's doing a wonderful job. And what I'm doing is I believe that there's more training needed for the in-house team. And so for someone to go in-house, they have to have a desire to to actually learn marketing. And if the executive team doesn't want to learn marketing, they need to have someone for the outside to come in. Because I literally sit there and do the training videos with them, and I work next to them. And I'm not talented in marketing, so I upset them. And eventually, they learn enough that they tell me how it should be done, finally, instead of me reading the books and doing the training, telling them how it should be done. And when it makes sense, it's a victory. And now I'm out of a job, which has always been my job, is how to replace my job. And now, as of this morning, when we're looking through our AdWords, my team, especially the lead, can now articulate how to set up and maintain, and monitor an AdWords campaign better than anybody I've ever interviewed and better than any single source, because it's multiple sources aggregated together, sprinkled with some experience on it, and now it's heading in the right direction. And now we're coming really close to our the cash funnel. That's the Holy Grail of any entrepreneur to know what is the throughput for marketing. And as an entrepreneur, what I had to really train my marketing team is that cash matters. I don't have any vanity metrics. I have no desire to be famous. I don't care about impressions. I don't care about clicks. I don't care about likes. I do care about the cash, and I do care about, obviously, to the click the funnel because I'm looking for constraints. And when I find constraints within the click the within the click the cash funnel, then I begin to remove the constraints.And so each of these metrics are asking a question. If we're getting 10 % conversions here, we're getting one % here. How can we get the one % back up to 10 %? How can we get our costs down? And if you guys want an inside secret, the best way in my mind to get your cost per acquisition down? It's easy. If you want to get that cost per acquisition down, blend it across multiple channels and ask your clients who else you should be doing business with. That's it. If you get free, it's free. If you have all this expensive, it's costing me 4,000 in cash here. If I'm asking and they're giving it to me for free, a blended rate between the two begins to drive that number down, which is ultimately we want cash in the bank account to go up and the amount of money to make the cash in the bank account to go up, to go down and call whatever label or methodology or channel that you want. Blending all the different channels together is a great way to get those numbers moving in the right direction. I'm still learning.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You dropped so much value in there. I was having a hard time writing some of these things down. I want to pull some stuff out that you shared, and honestly, I would highly encourage people that are watching or listening to this to go back to the beginning of that question and rewatch or relisten to this because there's a lot of good stuff in there, man. I love your analogy the marketing and the handstand. And I want to highlight some things there that you said. Most of us think it takes two weeks to learn a handstand. It takes six months. So many people think of marketing as a short term thing. And because of that, it never works. They give up too early. They're like, I tried that. I tried that. It doesn't work. It is a long term investment. You touched on near the end about optimization. You're always working on on optimizing. And that's why it is such a long term thing. You have to look at it as, look, most of the stuff we do from a marketing standpoint is not going to work, but that's why we have to measure the metrics that matter, which you touched on. We test, we measure, we learn, right? And when we learn, we can then optimize, and we just wash, It's repeat. Super, super valuable. The other thing that you touched on was it takes more than one person, right? You can't... And the reality is no matter how small are, you can still do a lot from a marketing standpoint with a small budget, okay? You don't have to have a $40,000 a month budget to get a lot of stuff done, but you have to invest it in the right places and you have to invest it wisely. And the biggest mistake I see MSPs, other small business owners make is it's like, oh, I'll hire a Marketing Manager or marketing coordinator. And the list of crap that they expect this one person to do is off the charts. It's like, This is unrealistic. You are looking for a unicorn, and they don't exist. You have to be realistic about your expectations.

Brian Terrell
They do exist. Do you know what they're called?

Tim Fitzpatrick
What?

Brian Terrell
They're your competition. They're called your competition because if anybody could do that list, they're going to open their own marketing company because it's hard to actually do marketing at that level. Once somebody taught me that, they're like, Okay, Brian, yeah, you can't expect from others what you're doing because you founded your own company because you weren't happy to just work in this cog as a cog on these machines. Anybody who can execute that list, like you said, is a unicorn. They're unfindable. Then to pay the salaries that they want to pay, nobody who could do that list is working for 60,000 a year. It's just not worth it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
No. Marketing is too broadat this point. You can't be great at everything. And so when I look at marketing, I see three critical areas: strategy, which I think of like the fuel, planning, Where you're outlining the marketing vehicles. You touched on Google Ads, right? Paid ads. That's a vehicle. And then leadership, where you put the driver in the seat to make sure that those vehicles get they need to go. And the biggest challenge as a small business owner when you're trying to lead your marketing efforts is unless you're good at marketing, you're trying to manage something you don't understand very well, and that never works well. And so if that's the case, it doesn't mean that you can't manage it, but it does mean that you need to get somebody from the outside to help guide you through that process. Otherwise, what happens is you make common missteps, you invest in things that you shouldn't, or you invest in things that you should, but you don't know how to hold those people that are actually implementing the vehicles accountable. You don't know what questions to ask. But if you had somebody to help guide you through that, they can help you with that and level up those skillsets. Because the other thing that you touched on, which is super important, is learning marketing, right? Even the people that you hire Whether they're your internal people, you should be investing in their skills and up-leveling their skills because it's dynamic. It's changing all the time, right? And so I think for most small business owners, they would be better off in the beginning, hiring a consultant, somebody that understands the strategy and the planning and the leadership side of it, and hiring either a part-time marketing coordinator or a virtual marketing assistant, somebody like that that can do a lot of the day-to-day work. So you've got an implementer, but you've got the strategic side of it that can help guide you as the owner. And as you see them do that, that's going to level up your skills so that you get more comfortable with it, right? And if you want to stay in that role and lead your marketing efforts, you can. But if you don't, it helps you get to a place where you can pull yourself out of it.

Brian Terrell
Exactly.

Don't be 100% Reliant on Any One Marketing Channel

Tim Fitzpatrick
So thank you for sharing that. Like I said, Brian, you dropped a ton of value in that answer. So thank you for that. I want to ask you a few other questions before we wrap up. Sure. If you had to single out one thing, what would you say has been the biggest driver of your growth?

Brian Terrell
Posting on LinkedIn lately. Right now, I think there's three pieces to it, and we're just going to work backwards since I started it now. So right now, posting on LinkedIn, being a very authentic, works. If you go to my LinkedIn It's Brian Terrell, GPL. You'll find it. And just these posts make me cringe, but the results are there, right? I'm getting easy access to people. When I call my network, I have 14,000 people on LinkedIn. So when I reach out to my network, they always knew who I was. We've been friends. We've been doing this for 20 years, some of us. But they're finding time now. It used to be difficult to set up-time. Everybody now is setting up-time. They're setting up-time, and it's been wonderful. I want to improve the content. I have my cap cut, and I'm going to start messing around. I'm going to hire my son to do the cameras for me. And he's 11, so give him his first job. It's going to be fun.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's cool.

Brian Terrell
Yeah. Why not? Business should be fun. It's really just a game. Next, we have, before that, AdWords and SEO came at the same time. I was trying to remember which one working backwards. So what happened was, as I worked with my first marketing team, and this is an ex-client that made me a lot of money. So I was able to repay the favor. And I'm on vacation. I was coming to Costa Rica years ago. And they're like, yeah, we're going to find this long list of 15 or 30 AdWords or search terms. They wanted 15 or 30 search terms, and they wanted to do them all right now. And I was like, hang on. I appreciate your effort that you guys wanted to do this. And this is a bit different. Google Ads isn't what it is now. Now, putting ads in, you run your process, you see what's clicking, what's not, you do your keyword search. Almost 10 years ago, I don't even think the tech was that way. And so what I had that team do, I was like, we're going to rank number one for workstation rentals for VFX now, and we're going to do that one word. And these guys are brilliant. They're really good. They're not in business now because they didn't want this to be their vehicle to getting wealthy. They wanted a different one. But it worked. It worked out. So we did that one search, and then that shows the power of SEO. And so if you look up workstation rentals, we should be the top rank. I check it all the time. And I wish that I had done more of that, and we're still working towards it. Getting SEO is an art in itself. But every now and again, from that channel, the organic search channel, we'll get a really good lead. The highest lead I ever got was a government agency. It was $400,000 contract, and they reached out to us through SEO. So that paid for a lifetime of SEO work.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Well, you're pulling out a really important thing that's easy for people to overlook. We don't want to be 100 % reliant on any one marketing channel. A lot of businesses are heavily dependent on referrals. Referrals are great, but they're not predictable and they're not scalable. And you don't need to be everywhere. But having three or four marketing channels that are producing consistent results help Helps level out the ups and downs. And even if one of those starts to underperform, you're still going to get where you want to go. You're not going to get there quite as fast, but you're still going to get there. And I can hear with some of the stuff you've shared, you've gotten to that place where you've got three, four different marketing channels that are bringing in leads. And that's a fantastic place to be. doing.

Conclusion

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I want to ask you one thing. One last thing as we wrap up, Brian. Knowing what you know now, is there anything you do differently?

Brian Terrell
Yeah. Let me give you a real answer I would do everything differently. But I would do it the way I know to do it. I wish... The website was built by the CMO from Avid. It's a corporation that makes video editing machines for those who don't know. And he worked with us to do the same. And I wish I had made keeping him on board a priority because having good marketing from day one removes so many barriers. There's so many people not buying from me. And it's doing because my website's not right, the verbiage isn't right, SEO is not right. My company didn't grow, the marketing messages, the one-sheets. All these different little things all add up. They call them golden babies. And it's just little tiny things that you do in marketing that, after a while, really stack up. And if I had one regret was not having a talented marketing person on day one, grow with me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. That's an answer that serves what I do well. So thank you. You just threw a softball out there. This has been a great conversation, Brian. I really appreciate it. Where can people learn more about you if they want to connect? And I know you mentioned your LinkedIn profile. We'll make sure we get that in the show notes. But your two companies, where are those at?

Brian Terrell
Gpltech.com and vfxnow.com. Gpl is a system integration company and managed service provider. Vfx Now does hardware as a service and sells hardware. Typically, We have high-end workstations. We have storage, switches, firewalls, and we have all the engineers you can ever want.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Awesome. I love it. Brian, thank you so much. I really appreciate you taking the time. It's been great connecting. And those of you that are watching, listening, thank you for doing so. If you want to connect with us, you can do that over at rialtomarketing.com. Brian was gracious enough to share a lot of the things that he's learned from a marketing perspective. Gosh, we talked about lead gen. He touched on messaging. We touched on niching. These are all areas of potential revenue roadblocks that can get in your way. If you want to know which of the nine revenue roadblocks are slowing down your growth, you can do that over at RevenueRoadblockScorecard.com. Takes less than five minutes. Go check it out. Brian, thank you again. Till next time. Take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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