Keys To Using Google & Facebook Ads To Generate Leads For Your Business

March

15

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Should you use Google Ads or Facebook Ads to generate leads for your business? Should you not use them at all? We will dig into this and a lot more with our special guest Gordon Van Wechel to help you make sense of paid advertising.

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Keys To Using Google & Facebook Ads To Generate Leads For Your Business



Tim Fitzpatrick
Should you use Google ads or Facebook ads to generate leads for your business? Or maybe you're wondering whether you should use them at all? We are going to dig into these questions and a lot more with our special guest today to help you make sense of paid online advertising. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. I am super excited to have Gordon Van Wechel from Alchemy Consulting Group with me today. Gordon, welcome, and thanks for being here.

Gordon Van Wechel
Thanks, Tim. I've been looking forward to our conversation.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, I'm looking forward to this. A lot of people struggle with paid ads. They're not sure whether they should do it, how they should do it. So I know we're going to have a super valuable conversation for them. Before we jump into that, I want to get to know you a little bit. I'm going to ask you some rapid fire questions. Are you ready to go?

Gordon Van Wechel
Let's do it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Gordon Van Wechel
I'm kind of a foodie. Other people would say food snob. I started working in commercial kitchens when I was 13. So one of the things that I really enjoy doing is cooking and entertaining. And if given the opportunity on a weekend, have a few friends over and I'll throw something together and just food and wine.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Sounds good to me. When can I come over? What's your hidden talent?

Gordon Van Wechel
I think I've got the ability to look at an idea at the thousand foot level, but then very quickly figure out how it can be implemented. The result of that is a lot of people will bring me ideas and some of which I think have merit and a lot don't. But I've just got that ability to look through and see the core of how something would be implemented.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Gordon Van Wechel
When I was in my mid 20s, I worked with a man who was in his early 70s, and Jack pulled me aside one day and was very complimentary about my business skills, but less complimentary about my social skills. He basically said, you need to stop being an ass to people. Learn to be gracious. Learn to be gracious. Recognize that not everybody is going to be able to provide value for you at the time you meet them, but treat them well, be interested in what they're doing, learn from them, and you never know when that might come back. And I found that to be true. So often, you know, we'll meet people at a networking event or socially, and there's no synergy whatsoever. You don't think there's ever going to be a connection. And two or three years later, you'll remember that conversation and there's something that they know about that you need help with. You can reach out to them, and you've had that good relationship to begin with. They help you. It does come back. So be gracious would be my answer.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Gordon Van Wechel
Probably my creative side. I'm best known as a typical type A business person, but I've spent years becoming a good photographer, and I've had my work exhibited. I've had the opportunity to travel to more than 60 countries carrying a camera. So I have a lot of what I think are interesting images. And then my other hobby for the last 35 years has been bonsai. Creating living sculptures, if you will. So it's that creative side that I think surprises people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What does success mean to you?

Gordon Van Wechel
Well, that's evolved over the years, but today I would say it's finding that balance between business, family, hobbies, working out, social. It's trying to step away from my business enough to let the other parts of my life come out.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Gordon Van Wechel
These days it would be working on a tree. There's kind of a Zen-like experience of sitting there with a new piece of material and trying to figure out what that tree is going to be willing to give me over the next three to ten years as I try to turn it into a living sculpture, that if I do a good job and care for that tree properly, it will most likely outlive me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Gordon Van Wechel
You know, as crazy as our society is these days with all of the screaming voices and their opinions, what I really value is someone who has the ability to exchange ideas in a positive way that acknowledges the validity of the other person, even when you don't agree with them.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's much harder to find today than it used to be, right?

Gordon Van Wechel
It really is. Yeah. The media has not helped us with that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Agree 100% on that one. So tell us a little bit more, Gordon, about what you're doing with Alchemy Consulting Group. You're really a marketing agency. What are you guys doing? What types of clients are you working with?

Gordon Van Wechel
Yeah, we're a full service ad agency. About 80% of what we do is traditional digital work. The other 20% is offline ad agency work. We have trademarked several products that we're very well known for, but we do all of the typical things, from building or refurbishing websites to helping companies manage their online reputation to doing search engine optimization. We do a lot with traffic, whether that's banner advertising, retargeting paid advertising, that's a huge part of our product mix. I think maybe the way that we help business owners most effectively. And one of the things that I try to teach our people to separate us from the myriad of other agencies out there is listening. It's really going through that discovery conversation with a new prospect or a new client and trying to understand what their goals and their aspirations are for their business. We all got into business because we had some big goals that we wanted to achieve. Sometimes that becomes more elusive as we get further into our companies. But where is it that business owner would like to be at some point in the future? Where are they today? And is there some ways that we can help them reach those goals and then to develop a plan to help them do that? And if we're the right fit for them, we're not the best fit for every business. We do a lot of work with companies in the building trades, with professional practices. We've done projects for other types of companies as well, but those are really our core areas of expertise. And if I don't feel like we're the best match for a prospective client, I'll refer them somewhere else. There's other people that do certain niches more effectively than we do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
When we look at paid advertising online, obviously Google and Facebook are like the 800 pound gorillas.

Gordon Van Wechel
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So really where the brunt of the business is, let's just tackle this first question of does a business need paid advertising?

Gordon Van Wechel
Almost every time the answer is yes. The exception would be a really well established local company that's had their website that they've done a proper job of optimizing and maintaining over the years. They're already on page one of Google for their primary keywords. Those are really rare, but that would be an exception for somebody that doesn't need paid advertising for almost every other business. I would say the answer is yes. And here's why. If you look at the first page of Google for most keywords today, there's ten organic listing spaces. In most keywords, anywhere from three to five of those are already taken up with some sort of national agency or national directory, a national company or a national directory. So that leaves five to seven spaces for local companies to achieve organically. Well, if you're relatively new to the market, less than five years in business, for example, your odds of getting there are really long without an extensive and expensive search engine optimization campaign. But you can get there very quickly with Google Ads. We can have a new business on page one getting their phone ringing in less than ten days using Google Ads. Facebook Ads, almost the same thing. With Facebook we like to really analyze who the company's ideal prospect is. And do they search for information on Facebook? If they're not using Facebook as an information source, that may not be a good place to advertise. But Google controls just over 70% of all of the search engines and searches made on the Internet. They really are the 800 pound gorilla. So, yes, we think that almost every business needs Google Ads.

Tim Fitzpatrick
The way I look at paid ads and curious for your input on this is paid ads it can be like a drug. You can get way too addicted to it. So I think it's dangerous to have too much of your business coming from paid ads, because that can change very quickly. But I think it's a great way to it's a great lead Gen channel to see quicker results than some of the other marketing tactics that may take a longer period of time. And it's just another channel to help even out your lead flow. How do you guys look at paid ads in the scheme of all the other channels that a company might be using?

Gordon Van Wechel
Tim, I bet if you and I sat here for five to ten minutes, we could come up with 50 different viable marketing channels that a business can follow, a lot of them online, a lot of them offline. And I think you make an excellent point. Paid advertising is one channel. It's a channel that I think just about every business needs, but it needs to be one of the channels that you market through. Paid ads will drive traffic, but if you don't have a proper place to take that traffic, you're going to lose the value of those prospects. If you don't have a good conversion funnel that you can bring that prospect through, that will help them come to know your company to the point where they trust you enough to pick up the phone, you're going to lose the value of that paid advertising. So it needs to be part of your overall marketing strategy. It isn't a be all and end all.

Tim Fitzpatrick
How do people choose? We've touched on you got Google Ads, you got Facebook Ads. Should I invest in one over the other depending on what I'm doing? Do I need to do both? How do you guys view that?

Gordon Van Wechel
I think almost every business needs Google Ads. Whether they need advertising on Facebook depends upon whether their ideal customer or their prospect is actually looking on Facebook for information. Facebook used to be a place where you could really hone in and be very specific about who you were targeting. That is less true in the last 12 to 15 months. Facebook has minimized their categories that you can target, and as a result, you're spending more money on ads. Imagine that. But it's a good branding play if you have a generic product. But if you're looking to actually get conversions out of Facebook, you have to really analyze how many of your prospects are shopping there or looking there for information. Google, on the other hand, and to a lesser extent, Bing, those ads are search base. Somebody's actually looking for what you offer based on the keywords that they're typing in. So that becomes a much more viable tool for attracting people who have intent.

Tim Fitzpatrick
High buying intent on Google Ads.

Gordon Van Wechel
On Google. Yes, they're searching for a reason now. They've they may be early in their search process, which is why I said a minute ago, you need that viable funnel. You need to have a path that you can take that prospect through while they're going through their decision making process.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Do you think, with Facebook I kind of see Facebook, I mean, people do go on to Facebook and buy, but that's not most people's primary intent on Facebook. So with Facebook, are we really more interrupting their activity to grab their attention with Facebook?

Gordon Van Wechel
Yes. I think that's a good way to put it. I think that we're putting an ad out there and we're hoping that it resonates with someone's subconscious. They've been thinking that maybe I need to look at that. But it's rare that we would take, say, a plumbing contractor and spend a lot of time and money doing ad creatives and putting them up on Facebook.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Gordon Van Wechel
It's not an effective way. The ROI on that kind of ad spend isn't as effective as it would be with Google Ads or other marketing channels.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Especially with the building trades. When people are searching, I got a burst pipe like, I need that fixed right now, right?

Gordon Van Wechel
That's right. Yeah. You're looking for the 24 hours emergency plumber.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So we really do need to look at we need to understand the customer journey. And when we do that, that's going to help us start to determine where we should be from a paid ads standpoint. Do you agree with that?

Gordon Van Wechel
Absolutely. There's a great marketing slogan, and I don't know, Rossa Reeves has been attributed to saying this. I don't know if he really did or not, but the slogan is, if you want to know what John Smith buys, you have to see the world through John Smith's eyes. And what he meant by that is you really need to understand what's going on in the mind of your prospect as they go through that customer journey. And you need to tailor your marketing funnel to meet them at those places and answer their questions. One of the problems we see with so many companies as they create these funnels is it's all feature based. The business owner is really proud and justifiably so of all of the great things they have in their company. But that may or may not resonate with the buyer who's looking for that specific product or service. We really want to make sure that our clients ad campaigns, whether they're paid ads or the regular digital or offline advertising, it really speaks to the benefits of working with them more so than the features.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Now if somebody wants to get started with paid ads, I know Google and Facebook do have some support. Why would we not want to go that route and instead work with an agency like Alchemy Consulting Group or freelancer, whatever it may be?

Gordon Van Wechel
Sure.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Why would we want to do that?

Gordon Van Wechel
Well, setting up an account and then properly managing that account are really two very different things. And you're right. Google's got a team of people that will help you set up an account. In fact, if you register a new business on Google, within a couple of days, you're going to get a mail piece offering you the first $50 of ad spend for free. Click this link and we'll help you set up your account. And that's a seductive offer. What you have to remember is over 90% of Google's billions and billions and billions of dollars of annual revenue come from ad spend. So they're very happy to help you set up an account. But they're not going to teach you all of the subtleties that will help you minimize your ad spend or maximize your ROI on that account. They're going to help you spend your budget every month. And they're less concerned about your ROI on that spend than I or any other agency is going to be, because you're not going to continue to work with us if we can't give you a positive ROI. So setting up that account, they're not going to teach you about things like negative keywords and putting the proper site links in your ads. How do you use your phone number in the ads? All of these little subtleties that make that ad more effective. They're not going to tell you to build a landing page that congruent with whatever the subject of each ad campaign is. They're just going to say, oh, yeah, go back to your website. People are looking for you. Take them to your website.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. I want to pull out a couple of things here that you said because I think it's easy for people to miss this. One you talked about sending people I'm putting an ad out in Google, for example, and rather than sending people right to the homepage of my website, I am taking them to a very specific page, specific language, and very specific calls to action. When I do that one, I can track things much better. So I'm going to get much more actionable data. But it's been a while since I've looked at this, but I was shocked at how many ads that I clicked on, which is rare for me. But sometimes I click on them just because I want to see. I cannot believe how many people are sending Google ads right to their home page. To me, that's like one of the biggest mistakes you can make.

Gordon Van Wechel
Yeah. I don't have a statistic on that either, Tim, but I can tell you it's the majority. And again, people don't know the classic example, let's go back to what you said a minute ago is you've got a burst pipe in the middle of the night. You need an emergency plumber. So if that happened, you're going to go to Google's a 24 hours emergency plumber. So the first term, the first company that pops up says they're a 24 hours emergency plumber. You click on the link, you go to the homepage of their website, you find out they've been in business for 37 years. They've got clean trucks. Their guys are in uniforms. And if you call this number, you can get help. You're going to go off on that site right away and you're going to go to the next one who takes you to a landing page that in big bold print says, 24 hours emergency plumbing. Call this number. Your problem solved. Now, what people don't really realize about AdWords is what determines the price of your ads isn't whether you're the top guy in that list of four ads. What determines your cost per ad is your quality score. And just like Google search algorithm is incredibly complex, the quality score algorithm is equally complex. And it's based in large part on how quickly Google's customer that is, the person searching gets their answer when they click on your ad. If they click on your ad and bounce, that's a negative on your quality score. If they click on your ad and stop searching, that's a positive. And by taking them to a landing page, that very specifically answers the question that was raised in that ad. That enhances your quality score. It lowers your price. It gets your ad presented more frequently. And back to our conversation a minute ago, when Google helps you set up your ad campaigns, they don't teach you about quality score. And that's the whole thing that helps you save money is enhancing that quality score.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, it seems to me. Yeah. Oh, go ahead.

Gordon Van Wechel
For that reason, the answer to your question that's on the screen, why would I need to use an agency? Agencies understand these things. It's our business, too. Again, there's a lot of agencies that will say they do Google ads. You want an agency that's actually got some experience doing it and preferably that done it in your business niche. If you're a plumber, you don't want a guy that specializes in plastic surgeons.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It seems to me that with setting up ad campaigns, whether it's Google or Facebook, it's the little things that make all the difference in the world. And when you don't do this on a daily basis, you just don't know. I mean, you go into the Facebook ads platform and you try to start putting in all this targeting. It gets really confusing really fast.

Gordon Van Wechel
Yes. And putting the right code on your landing pages and your thank you pages so you can really accurately track conversions, paid advertising, if you can't monitor all of the metrics that are going to give you the ability to calculate a proper ROI, you're really kind of throwing money down the drain.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. I hear this problem all the time. I'm spending money on marketing, and I don't know whether it's working or not. And that all goes back to what you just said. They're not tracking the appropriate metrics to inform their decisions, which is so important.

Gordon Van Wechel
And if you're going to use an agency, obviously I'm biased, I think you should use an agency, one of the questions you need to ask that agency is what kind of reporting are you going to give me? How am I going to be able to measure your effectiveness as an agency? Are you going to help me determine the ROI on these various channels you're suggesting to me? Because, again, you're a business owner. You need to be running your business, whatever your product or service is, that's your area of expertise.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I know this varies, so this is a little bit of a loaded question, Gordon, but in general, if somebody's going to reach out to an agency like yours, how do agencies typically price paid ads? Because you certainly have your ads spend. The ad spend is going directly to Google or Facebook. That's not going in the agency's pocket. Typically, there's a few different ways. How do most agencies typically make money on paid ads?

Gordon Van Wechel
Most agencies will charge a flat fee plus a percentage of the ads spend. I've never understood the percentage of the ad spend part of that. So we charge a flat fee and we've got a sliding scale based on how much you're spending. So we'll charge $750 to create and manage the campaigns. And I don't care whether you're spending $500 or $3,000 in ad spend. Our fee is the same because the work is the same.. When you get over that 3000, now we're creating a lot more campaigns. We're working with more keywords. Our fee goes up. So we've scaled it that way. You play us pay us a flat fee, and if for no other reason, it makes it easy for the client to calculate the ROI. They know they've got this amount plus this amount, and it generated this. I think it's more fair to the client to have that flat fee rather than me take a percentage of your ad spend.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I agree with you on that. I think most people are going to find agencies doing set fee plus percentage of ad spend or just a percentage of ad spend in most cases, right, Gordon?

Gordon Van Wechel
It's rare. I don't know a lot of agencies that don't have some flat fee built in.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Gordon Van Wechel
To create an AdWords campaign is labor intensive.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Gordon Van Wechel
To do it properly, you're doing really extensive keyword research. You're trying to balance the search volume and the cost per click against what the client's budget is. So I could choose three keywords that have high cost per click and spend your entire budget. Or I could choose one of those and then a couple of medium keywords and a couple of less searched keywords and cover a broader spectrum for you and get you a better return on that budget. But that's all work that we have to do upfront. Something we haven't talked about is the importance of negative keywords. You don't want to pay for clicks that aren't relevant for your business. The classic example is you're an implant dentist. You don't want to pay for a click for someone who is online searching for breast implants, not your business. So why should you pay for that inadvertent click? So by putting in all of those negative keywords, another one is people that are looking for jobs in your area, you don't want to pay for somebody who's looking for a job. So those all fall into negative keywords. And that's an important part of setting up a campaign. Split testing. We're really good at this. We've managed over 10 million in ad spend with our AdWords team. So we're really pretty knowledgeable about this. But I wouldn't be so presumptuous to say that I could take on a new business and automatically know the ads that are going to be most effective for that company in their market area this time of year. We're doing constant split testing. We'll do the AB tests on the headlines, on the body copy of the ad trying to hone in. And it's going to take us a couple of months to really get the most effective ads. Not to say we won't make the phone ring right away, but to really maximize the client's ad spend, it's going to take us sometimes two, sometimes four months as we're doing all that split testing. But that's labor intensive, that's manual work. I can't automate that with a bot somehow. I've got to have one of our people effectively monitoring that individually.

Tim Fitzpatrick
There's a couple of things I want to pull out here. One, it sounds like with paid ads, there's the initial set up, but you're really never done optimizing. This is not a set it and forget it thing.

Gordon Van Wechel
Absolutely true.

Tim Fitzpatrick
The other thing that I want to pull out that you just said is in regards to testing. This is a perfect example of what you're talking about. I actually talked to a prospective client last week that they own a franchise and the franchise owner is guiding paid ads on Facebook for all the franchisees. They're using the same ad creative everywhere. Some markets are absolutely killing it. They're doing great and others like it's a trickle. So you got the same business, same ads, different markets. They're not working consistently across the board, which goes back to your point of you got to test because even the same businesses, there are nuances in the markets and in the types of clients. And you don't know that until you start testing.

Gordon Van Wechel
Exactly right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
We've talked a little bit, you've touched on some of the do's and don'ts like with Google ads. You talked about negative keywords. A lot of people overlook that. They don't exclude keywords. And because they don't exclude keywords, people are clicking and they're paying and they're not even relevant to their business. They're never going to convert. We talked about sending people directly to a landing page. Don't send people right to the home page of your website. It's not going to convert as well as it should. What other do's and don'ts do you have that you think would be valuable for people to know about.

Gordon Van Wechel
A couple of do's. One do have a plan. Understand what it is that you're trying to accomplish with your ad campaigns, who you're targeting, what it is that you're offering. So have a plan. Don't just, oh, we're going to do some ads. It's like when the yellow page salesperson came in and said, oh, by the way, I need this by Friday. So you quickly throw something together that you're going to pay on every month for the next year. It's important that you have a plan for any paid ad campaign. Negative keywords, we've talked about one of the things that we often suggest, in fact, we'll always suggest that not everybody will do it, there's another marketing channel that works synergistically with paid advertising, and that's retargeting. Most people don't understand retargeting conceptually, but they've experienced it. If you've ever shopped on ebay or Amazon, you'll look at a product and then you see ads for that product for the next couple of weeks while you're online. Well, you've been retargeting. The synergistic relationship between paid ads and retargeting is this, somebody clicks on that ad, they go to your landing page or they go to the proper page on your website that features that product or service. They're not mutually exclusive, but they go there and they don't make a decision. Now, Google will say that statistically, 96% of the time people visit your website, they don't make a decision. I don't know if that's true when they're coming from a paid ad, but still a lot of people will not. So by retargeting each of those pages, whether it's a landing page or the pages on your website, you can keep your company's brand effectively in front of that person while they continue to do their research as they go through their buyers journey. So those two work together synergistically. So we always suggest that somebody needs to do retargeting along with it. Another do is to write those ads that are benefit focused. I touched on that earlier. A couple of don'ts. Don't make premature decisions. And what I mean by that is a lot of times we'll see an ad that runs for several weeks, it's only gotten a few clicks, and the owner will say, well, this ad isn't working. We need to change it out. That may or may not be true at that point. We like to see an ad get a certain number of clicks, certain number of impressions. We need to know that that ad has actually been fully deployed in the marketplace before we evaluate whether it needs to be changed. So don't make premature decisions. And we've talked about this several times. Don't just take people to your homepage. You've got to go to a page that's specifically congruent with the ad that you're getting people to click on.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So if somebody's going to run retargeting campaigns, they're going to have their main campaign and then a retargeting campaign to supplement and hit those people that did not take the intended action. With Retargeting, is Retargeting typically more cost effective than the initial campaign up front?

Gordon Van Wechel
Absolutely. With a Google ads or a Facebook ad, you're paying a price per click. And that price is dependent on how competitive that keyword is and your quality score. So we work with a lot of contractors that might pay $35 to $60 per click, depending upon the part of the country they're in. We worked with a law firm in Los Angeles that was happy if they could get a click for $130. So there's a lot of variables there. With Retargeting, you're paying a cost per thousand impressions. That's less dependent on the market. It's really just how many people see that ad or how many times your customer that visited your website is exposed to your ad. We've got a proprietary dashboard that allows us to control how many times a day your ad is displayed to any one person. We can identify specific websites that we want it displayed on, and then we can control our bid price per thousand impressions so that we get more opportunity. But typically, you're going to pay $60 in a very round number. You're going to pay $50 to $60 per thousand impressions, where you might pay 20 to 50 per click in a lot of other paid ad campaigns.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. Is most of your business with Google and Facebook ads on the online advertising side, or are you guys getting involved in YouTube, Twitter, LinkedIn ads? What's that look like for you guys?

Gordon Van Wechel
It depends upon where our clients prospects hang out, and that's our standard answer with any time somebody talks to us about social media. Great. Let's look at social media platforms in terms of do your prospects spend time there? We don't do a lot of work with retail, but when we've had retail clients, restaurants, for example, Twitter is a much more effective platform than some others. We're seeing Pinterest in a lot of niches, has some viability these days, and the boom market right now is in YouTube ads.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. I was going to say.

Gordon Van Wechel
I find them particularly annoying because I get into watching this video and all of a sudden an ad pops up and I can't wait to click off of it. But we're seeing a lot of ad spend going to YouTube now. And the interesting thing about that is, depending upon where the ad is placed in the video, it has to run for a certain length of time before you pay for it. So again, when I click off early, it's not costing that company any money because I clicked off early. But we're seeing a lot more advertising going to YouTube these days.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I know of some people that with some of the things that were happening with Facebook ads, some of those changes that you touched on, some of the iOS issues that were going on with Facebook and not being able to track certain data. I know some people that shifted ads to YouTube. And the thing that I find interesting about YouTube ads, and I'm sure you know this much better than I do is the targeting on YouTube can be pretty strong because you can put your ads in front of people that are watching very specific types of videos. Can you touch on that a little bit?

Gordon Van Wechel
Well, I can give you a personal example. I've been evaluating a couple of different CRM customer relationship management products just to see if there was some new products out there that might perform better than the ones that we're using now. And it's amazing as I go to YouTube and look at some of the training and some of the introductions to these products, competing products will have ads on those videos.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Gordon Van Wechel
And to carry it a step further, as I look at other places online, I'm seeing banner ads pop up for those same companies that are targeting me on my YouTube searches. So there's no way to escape it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right. You really can target pretty heavily with YouTube. And the other thing is it's YouTube. So there's obviously a lot of video ads, and video is a great way to connect and engage with people.

Gordon Van Wechel
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Gordon, this has been a fantastic conversation, man. You've dropped a ton of really helpful info. Any last minute thoughts you want to leave us with today.

Gordon Van Wechel
For your audience that are business owners, I'll leave one metaphor that I occasionally use when I speak from the stage, and that is the jugglers never get rich. What I mean by that is I love to go to summer fairs, street fairs, and neighborhood fairs. And the people that I particularly like to watch are the jugglers. I'm fascinated. One, I know you live in Denver, Tim. One of the best ones I ever saw was in Denver a few years ago, and he was juggling three active chainsaws of all things. And doing it safely. But the reason I suggest that as an effective metaphor for business owners is every time I look at these jugglers and they always have a little hat or a box or something in front of them for people to leave tips. But very few people that have enjoyed the show in the crowd actually walk up and leave a tip. Jugglers never get rich. Despite all of the hours they spend in training and how well honed their presentation is, they just don't make a lot of money. As a business owner, you need to focus on those things that got you into business in the first place, either your love of what you do or your expertise or both. And oftentimes, marketing is not something you know or even know how to get started learning. And you're much better off to outsource things like marketing rather than try to work with multiple sales people that come in and just want to sell you a product. Jugglers never get rich. Business owners that try to do everything themselves never get rich because they can't focus on what it is that they really should be doing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, awesome advice. So where can people learn more about you? They know they need help. They want to chat with you. Where's the best place for them to go Gordon?

Gordon Van Wechel
The Alchemy Consulting Group. Alchemy is A-L-C-H-E-M-Y. Thealchemyconsultinggroup.com. That will go through both our trademark products as well as our Ala carte products. And if you go to the contact page we'll invite you to a discovery meeting. No obligation to that and it truly is a discovery meeting. It's a chance for us to ask you questions about your business. You've got to ask us questions. Let's see if there's a fit and if there isn't, I'll tell you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Love it. Gordon thank you so much for those watching listening again. It's thealchemyconsultinggroup.com. If you want to chat with Gordon and his team hop on over there. He obviously knows what he's talking about. He's just dropped a ton of value on Google and Facebook ads so hop on over there. We just want to thank you guys for tuning in. Again, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with realtor marketing. Now if you are struggling with your marketing, your not quite sure what that next right step is, you've tried all the various tactics and nothing seems to be working. Hop on over to our website at rialtomarketing.com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing.com. Click on the get a free consult button. I would be happy to chat with you and give you some clarity on what those next steps should be based on where you are and where you want to go. Until next time take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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