Lead Generation Through Workshops, Training, and Events

Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience.


Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Amy Babinchak for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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Lead Generation Through Workshops, Training, and Events

Tim Fitzpatrick
Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe you must remove your revenue roadblocks to accelerate growth and marketing shouldn't be difficult. I am really excited to have with me today, Amy Babinchak from Third Tier. Amy, welcome and thank you for being here.

Amy Babinchak
Hey, you're welcome. Thanks for inviting me, Tim.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Absolutely. I am excited to dig into this. Before we jump in, I want to ask you a few rapid fire questions if you're ready to rock.

Amy Babinchak
Shoot.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Very quickly, what do you do and how long have you been doing it?

Amy Babinchak
Well, I am a technical person and I love the whole of the IT industry. I like to be involved in all aspects of its community. I'm a real community focused person. So I own an MSP that's 23 years old, Third Tier that you just mentioned, that's my firm that supports other IT pros through technical support, blog writing, white papers, courses, I have some online communities, all right, whatever comes to my mind that I think will be helpful to folks. And then I have another M&A small consulting firm where we help people with small firms that are they've never sold one or bought one before, and they need help, hand holding through that process. And then I'm also a 16 year Microsoft MVP.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Is that it? That's all?

Amy Babinchak
Yeah, that's it. And it's not very interesting.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, you're busy. So in these 23 years of running your MSP, what's the most important lesson you've learned?

Amy Babinchak
I don't know if you're going to like this, but there's two. One is people lie and some people don't pay their bills. Those were two lessons that were the hardest thing for me to learn because it never even occurred to me that there were people like that in the world. It was that. Those were hard, hardest lessons for me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
When you don't think that way, it's hard to see that, right?

Amy Babinchak
Yeah. You ask somebody something and they just lie straight to you. You're just like, What?

Tim Fitzpatrick
I remember the first business I was involved in was a wholesale distribution company. When I started, I was super green, right out of college. My dad had started the business a couple of years before, and I was doing everything. I was doing shipping, receiving, accounts receivable. I had to laugh the first few times. I always heard somebody say like, Hey, yeah, the cheque's in the mail. Then a week later, the cheque still wasn't there. I was like, What that? He told me it was coming. Why is it not here? Those are some learning lessons for me, too. Obviously, in 23 years, plenty of ups and downs in that amount of time. Is there any mantra or motivational thing that you say to yourself or you share with your team to help push through those times?

Amy Babinchak
Well, I actually honestly thought that I invented the phrase, everything will be okay in the end. And if it's not okay, it's not the end. A friend actually gave me a card on a magnet for my refrigerator deal, and it had that phrase on it and it was attributed to anonymous. And I pointed at it, I was like, That's me. Because I would say that all the time, like, Everything's going to be fine. This is just part of the process. We're going to get through it. I'm just always an optimistic person and I always expect that the outcome is going to be good.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that. Everything will be okay in the end. If it's not okay, it's not the end.

Amy Babinchak
Right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I like that. I've never heard that one. That is a new one on me and I think it's a great one. That way, it also just tells you like, Hey, if it's not okay, you still need to keep working through this?

Amy Babinchak
Yeah, right. There's no problem that's insurmountable. We're just in process. That's all.

The Importance of Hiring the Right People and Delegating Tasks

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, yeah, that's right. Well, I know, Amy, when we initially connected, one of the things you shared with me was that you gave away your job, and you've been able to pull yourself out of a lot of the day to day tasks. And if I remember correctly, you have a team of seven or eight people, correct?

Amy Babinchak
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you got a decent enough sized team, but it's not huge. And you've still been able to pull yourself out, which I think is a huge roadblock for a lot of people. How have you done this?

Amy Babinchak
Well, you don't just wake up one day and say, Today I'm going to stop working in my business and let everybody else handle it. It's a long, slow process. When I started part of my business, it's just me. And then a couple of years into it, I was like, Maybe this business is... I wasn't sure if I was starting a business or if I was just doing this for a while till I decided to go get another job. Well after a couple of years, I was like, oh, well, I do like doing this. I think I am going to have a business. That was the mindset shift for me from I'm going to be a tech to I'm going to have a business. When I made that decision, on that day, I said to myself, If I'm going to have a business, I need to have employees and I need to be able to work my business. I said to myself, are you ready to give up being a tech? I still have never given up being a tech because I love technical work, but no customer calls me on the phone and says, Oh, Amy, can you help me with this problem? I'm now the big picture person. I'm not handling the client issues. When I made that decision to have a business, that's when I decided that what I have to do is start giving away my job. I'm going to hire my first employee and I'm going to give them part of my job. Then each subsequent person that came along was me giving them part of my job until eventually my job is gone.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Do you remember what work you got rid of at what times? Do you remember the first thing you got rid of?

Amy Babinchak
Yeah, I think I did this probably the opposite that most people do it. I always gave away the thing that I was best at because I understood exactly how it should be done, how to train somebody to do that, how to hire the right person for that task. And so the very first thing that I gave away was not all of it, but a portion of the customer support that I was doing. I hired somebody that I thought could become nearly as good as me, and I then began to entrust him with that. Then the next person was the same person, another technical person that I could give more of that work to. And it wasn't until I got to the fifth person that I started to give away things I didn't understand as well, like the back office work, the accounting work, the different sorts of things like that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's an interesting way of thinking about it. I don't think there's any right or wrong way to do it. The way you did it has worked incredibly well for you. Some people say, Well, get rid of the low dollar tasks that you're wasting your time on right now that aren't the highest and best use of your time. But I think the way you did it, it's fascinating. My guess is it made it... Because you were getting rid of the stuff that you were really good at, I think it's hard to transition the stuff that you're not great at because it's harder to train, it's harder to put in those systems and processes. But when you get rid of the stuff that you're great at, it's a lot easier to make sure that it's being done correctly, right? And the systems and processes are there. Did you find that to be the case?

Amy Babinchak
Yes, I definitely found that to be the case. I think the other thing that happened was that the corporate culture became extremely solid because every person, all the first three people in the company were clones of me. They operated exactly as I operated and they believed in the mission of the company exactly as I did. The customers were very comfortable working with them, and we just formed this really tight cohesive unit of how things are done at Harbor.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. How long of a transition was that? How long did it take you to give away your job?

Amy Babinchak
It was slow, but I didn't have a time frame that I put on it. I just knew that that was the path I was on. I would say it probably took me 15 years. It was just slowly moving in that direction. I never wavered from moving in that direction. It's just the company grew slowly and I moved along with it. And then I just kept giving away little pieces along the way as it made sense to do so.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, and sometimes you just have to let that process unfold. Depending on where the business is from a revenue standpoint, the revenue starts to dictate when and which people you start to hire, right?

Amy Babinchak
Yeah, it definitely does. The business has to be a certain size before you can start hiring nonrevenue generating employees, which is the last part that I ended up giving away. But like I said, I wasn't in any hurry. I was just letting it happen as it happened. I was happy with working in the business as I was and doing things. It's just that there was this goal out there. I was ultimately moving toward that goal, but not on any schedule, my schedule or anybody else's schedule. It was just what was going to happen.

Lead Generation Through Workshops, Training, and Events

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So i know one of the things we talked about, too, when we initially connected was that you're still heavily involved in all the marketing efforts. You oversee the marketing efforts for your company. What are some of the tactics that have worked really well for you?

Amy Babinchak
Well, in the beginning, when I was doing the marketing and doing the tech and doing the accounting, you got wearing so many hats. The thing that worked best for me was direct mail because I could send out a thousand letters with my business card in it. I would do letters of introduction and I would send those out with my business cards in them. And invariably, I would get two to five calls in the next couple of months with customers that were basically ready to sign. They would get that and it would hit somebody. If I sent out enough, it would hit somebody at the right moment. And then they would self select that they wanted to become our client. And so that was really using that shotgun approach was very successful for a busy entrepreneur. And then as things moved along and the company got more mature, I was able to spend more time. And the other thing that ended up being quite successful for us has been training events. Where we bring in clients and prospects together and we train them on how to do stuff in Microsoft 365, how to use some of the apps, how to introduce them to apps that they didn't even know they owned, some tips and tricks on stuff and just provide information. It was a stroke, accidental stroke of genius to have both clients and prospects in the room. We wanted to fill the space and we wanted to provide value to clients and we wanted to invite some prospects. Then once we got them in the room together, it was like, oh, this was really smart because the clients were selling to the prospects. I didn't have to. So that was pretty awesome. Yeah. Having clients and potential clients in the same room was accidentally the smartest thing I ever did. I didn't plan it exactly that way, but then the client started selling to the prospects, and it was brilliant. As the training went along, the prospects realized that they were in the room with our clients because we'd be presenting and then referring to scenarios that related to our clients or talking to them by name. Then the prospects would realize that, oh, that person is one of their clients. Then in a break, they would start to talk to each other. It was an amazing way to gain new clients. Right now, we're actually doing a similar thing. It hasn't been as successful yet, but I think it's going to grow. We've actually gotten one new client a month so far, so that's decent. We're doing business networking events where we're doing the same thing. We're inviting our clients. Then I go on LinkedIn and I invite a bunch of other local businesses too. We've landed a new client from every one of those. It's the same way. We're having a hugging people as they're coming in the door and meeting them and then introducing people to each other. Then there's a new person in the room. Again, they realized that some of these people here are actually clients of Harbor.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. You're pulling from what worked before, slightly different flavor or variation on it, and doing it all over again. It sounds like those are hyper local to your specific geographic area, but you are using online platforms like LinkedIn to invite local people that might be interested.

Amy Babinchak
Yeah. When we were doing the training events, I figured out how to use LinkedIn. What I did is I went out and connected with all of my clients. Then I looked at their LinkedIn to see who they were connected with, and I connected with all of those people, and then I invited those people to the event. I was like, Hey, we both know Jack. Jack's going to be coming to our training. Thought I would extend an invitation to you. Do you want to come over and learn something more about your Microsoft 365 environment? That's how we found people to invite.

Tim Fitzpatrick
With the networking, are you always talking about specific topics? Is there a set structure with it? How do you do it?

Amy Babinchak
The networking is no set structure, and we move it to a different location every time. We're probably not doing business networking right, but we move it to a different location around town each time. And we're using all the local group hubs just because the environment is very conducive to having a group of 10 to 15 people standing around chatting instead of a restaurant where you're sitting at a table. And this way, there's no expense to us. We just show up and we tell the hostess or whoever's there, like, hey, we're going to be meeting some people here and we're just going to be... Can we just have that high top table? We're just going to be chatting with some folks over there and they're like, yeah, sure. Yeah. So we're actually meeting up at local brew pub places, and we don't tell them that we're holding a networking event at their place. So it doesn't actually cost us any money, except we do spring for the first drink that anybody wants. I bought a lighthouse off of Amazon. And so when I send the invitations out, I tell them to look for the lighthouse, and we just set it on the table. So it's just like a prop. It's about 18 inches high. We don't light it up or anything, but it's just a thing on the table. And so we just walk in and we tell the host that we're going to take this high tab table over here and some other folks might join us. They're like, Oh, yeah, sure. No problem. Because the group hubs are just a really great informal environment. It's got the right vibe for people standing around chatting.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Well, look, one new client a month from this is I would say that you're onto something. It's working. It's generating leads that are turning into clients, so keep doing it. One of the other things you mentioned, too, was like, Hey, I don't know if we're doing it right. We're moving from one location to another. You know what? You learn as you go. You learn as you do it. You make course corrections and it's just going to continue to get better and better. But it sounds like it's working extremely well. So I never tell people to stop doing things that are working.

Amy Babinchak
Well, I think if you were really trying to build up a business networking event that you see a lot of these, they tend to get really big because they invite the same people. We never invite the same people. So I'll take a different set of clients and invite them. And so it's always new and it's always small. And small, 10 to 15 people, and we're just trying to have a couple of good conversations. That's the goal.

Tim Fitzpatrick
A lot of people focus on the quantity rather than the quality. I think you get good people there, 10 to 15 is large enough where you can work your way and at least touch a majority of the people that are there and have a conversation. You're picking up a lot of good stuff and it's obviously working, so keep doing it. One of the things I was going to ask you about, I know this is not relegated to the Managed Service provider space, but it definitely is something that I see in the Managed Service provider space a lot. There's a ton of competition. A lot of people, and there are a lot of MSPs that are communicating the same message. You go to five MSP websites, pull off logos, you have no idea who anybody is because they all say the same thing.

Amy Babinchak
Right.

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Simple Ways to Differentiate Your Business in an Ocean of Competitors

Tim Fitzpatrick
Are you doing to set your company apart from competitors? And has this helped drive growth for you?


Amy Babinchak
I speak at conferences and stuff from time to time. And one of the things that I've taught people to do is to create a great tagline because differentiation is a problem in our industry. Just in my county, the county tells me that there are 2,000 businesses in technology. But yet the opportunity seems infinite because I very rarely bump into them. They're out there, but they're not really active. They're not actively out marketing and recruiting clients and stuff, as far as I can tell. So I think having a great tagline is important. And our tagline is, we care about your business, which doesn't say anything at all about, Hey, we're super fast and we're great tech people, which is what almost every IT website says.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's right.

Amy Babinchak
They all say the same thing. And the other thing that I've done differently is, many business owners in this field like to keep the clients at arm length from their text. When we do our training events, I make all my text speak at it. And when we have these networking events, it's not mandatory that my text come out to it, but one or two of them do every time just on their own. And it's because they know that some of their clients that they interact with are going to be there, and they want to see them, too. So it's really about, I want to be seen as depth of expertise. It's not all about me. And it's okay with me if they get attached to that tech. They're business people. They understand that there's turnover in the world. So they're a little bummed when the tech that they got attached to left, but they know there's going to be another great one coming down the line that they'll get used to all over again. Because it's all about the way that Harbor does business and the way that they feel treated when they work with us.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. I love the fact that you talk about your tagline. I oftentimes refer to this as a core message, your unique selling proposition. I love the fact that we care about your business. Like you said, it has nothing to do with tech, which in reality, that's not really what most people care about.

Amy Babinchak
Well, theoretically, that's why they're hiring us because they need somebody to deal with their technology.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Correct.

Amy Babinchak
But I don't know, are you going to hire somebody who's cheap, fast, and skilled or somebody who cares?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Exactly.

Amy Babinchak
I use that when I'm meeting somebody at the table to talk about on that sales call. Invariably, they'll talk to other MSPs and they'll start to talk about what those talking points were that they're in the learning process. They've learned something about how MSPs present themselves. So then by the time they get to me, they'll have this checklist, right? Well, do you do antivirus? Do you have malware? Do you have this? Do you have remote access? And I'm just like, we have all that stuff. Everybody has all that stuff. Let's talk about your business and what you guys actually need. And take me on a tour of your company and let's see how you operate. First they'd want to take you to the server room. I'm like, I've seen that before. I want to see your company. I want to see your people. I want to know, depending on what business they're in, where the raw material comes in the door and the widget goes out the door. No matter what business you are, you have that whether it's a law office where person comes in and they talk to the receptionist and then they go to the lawyer who sends out the stuff, the divvies up the jobs to the legal aides. I make them take me through their job process. I'm like, Take me through what a client experience is, or a customer experience is, or your manufacturing process from beginning to end just so I can see how things flow around here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Does that help you at times, pinpoint specific needs that may not be met by their current IT infrastructure?

Amy Babinchak
Yeah. So we're talking about they're telling me all about their business, right? And they're getting pretty excited about it because the reason I like working with small business is because everybody in small business, somebody there has got the passion for what they do, right? They created this business to do something. And so we like to have these meetings with the business owner so that we can key off of that passion. And so they'll be telling me about how things work and that area. And invariably along the way as we're learning things about their business, we can say stuff like, Oh, if you guys tried using this, we have another client that does something really similar because they'll tell you about a problem or a challenge when they get to certain department or whatever. And so we can make these little suggestions along the way. So already we've provided value to them. Then we go back in the conference room and it's like, Well, we can get started helping you guys out with this tomorrow. All you have to do is sign this contract.

Tim Fitzpatrick
But taking the time to really understand them, their business, their challenge, it sounds like it's setting you apart from how some of your competitors approach the sales process.

Amy Babinchak
Yeah. It's probably because they don't actually have any salespeople. We do have technical people here. I guess we approach sales differently than a professional salesperson would do it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I can't remember the quote exactly and where it comes from, but touches on people don't care until they know that you care, which actually, frankly, goes back to your tagline, Amy. And by taking the time to learn about their business and listen, you are showing that you care, which I think is tremendous.

Amy Babinchak
When I teach people about the value of a tag line, and I've got a little process to help them develop one. I say, you know what? This tag line will sell for you. Because somebody's going to see that and it's always speaking for you. It's always saying something about your business. So it's on your email signature, it's on your website, it's everywhere. It's everywhere out there. People begin to associate that with your business. And what they associate with my business is that we care about their business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Is the framework for that simple, the tagline that you use?

Amy Babinchak
You mean as far as developing it?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. If we were going to go down this path right now, is this a two or three minute conversation or is it a 20 minute conversation?

Amy Babinchak
Well, to actually do it is a little a little bit of a process because the way that I teach it is to have somebody write their origin story of why they created their business and then their story of how they perform their services and why. And this makes them have to think about what that is. And then once you start writing this stuff out, I've got like five or six questions, they have to write a paragraph or two about each of these and explain what it is about their, essentially, their values of their company. At the end, the tag line just distills itself out. You read through all of this and you're like, oh, this is why we exist.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, got it. And communicate that in a way that gets the potential client to see the value in actually working with you. I really like that. I'm going to add to this because I think there are some simple ways that a lot of people overlook. Because when you start to dig into messaging, it is really tough for us as business owners to create messaging for ourselves because we just can't see the forest through the trees. We're too close to the fire. We don't think very objectively about our businesses. I'm going to share an example that I share quite often because it's a really simple one. But we worked with a residential siding contractor. This was probably five years ago. I would say that residential contractors are probably not all that much different from messaging perspective as what we just touched on with MSPs. You go to a roofer in Denver and they all say we're the number one roofer in Denver or best quality roofing products, whatever. Who cares? What we did as part of the process for this client, I always recommend people interview their current ideal clients because hearing what they have to say is absolutely invaluable. But one of the things that we also did for this client was we just looked at their reviews. They had a ton of Google reviews. Reviews are a treasure trove of information for messaging. One of the women that left a review in there said something to the effect of, They treated my house like it was their own. I was like, There you go. Who doesn't want to work with the contractor to treat their house like it was their own? That became that core message, that tagline, totally different than everybody else, differentiates them because everybody expects good quality product and all that. But are you going to walk through my house with mud on your shoes? Are you going to are you going to clean up afterwards? Well, if you treat my house like your own, you're certainly not going to do that. So super simple example of how people can get really good tidbits of information that they can use in their messaging.

Amy Babinchak
Yeah, I think that makes total sense. I know when I was interviewing roofing contractors, my questions were not really about the roofing material because I don't know anything about shingles. What colors do you want? Will we use this brand? And blah, blah, blah. I'm like, Okay, what color do they have? The brand name of the shingle they used didn't mean a whole lot to me. But what I wanted to hear from them was how they were going to protect my landscaping. The guys shovel off the shingles and it all falls off the roof. And there was one guy who was like, Oh, well, we're going to put... He was like, I totally understand where you're coming from. We put sheets of plywood down across off the roof so that everything slides off onto the grass rather than down into the landscaping close to the house where people usually have things. He said, So it'll be out, we'll clean up, we have powerful magnets that we go around and make sure that we've got all the thing. I was like, You're my guy.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. See, look at that. You expected a good roof, but you didn't want to have to deal with all the aftermath. I found roofing nails all over my yard for months. There's still probably plenty out there when I had my roof done. And yeah, that's a class. Another great example of a roofer might think that clients care about X, totally off. All you cared about was, hey, is my landscaping going to be clean when you're done?

Amy Babinchak
My landscaping is right. I'm paying you for a roof, my landscaping got destroyed, so now I have to relandscape, right? Yeah.

How to Be Consistent with Marketing

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. So in the marketing vein, still going down this path, I know one of the things you said was a big challenge for you with marketing, which is a challenge for a lot of people, is just simply keeping it up, being consistent and just doing it over and over again. How are you managing this now? How are you pushing through that challenge of just being consistent?

Amy Babinchak
Well, I didn't for so many years. Honestly, when you're wearing too many hats, you just can't. So we would do it in fits and starts, which is actually okay when your business is small too, because you can't handle very many new clients at one time anyway and do a decent job with them. So we would do a bunch of marketing, send out those letters, do a make contacts, ask for referrals, all that good stuff. And then we would get some new clients in and it would be like, Okay, now we have to deal with the fact that we have some new clients and they take up a lot of time. Then we would stop, which was good because it let us manage the clients properly. I never actually marketed until I decided that it was time to grow again. And then we would crank up the marketing engine and start doing it again, then we would stop. But once your business gets to the point where you've got people handling all that day to day work, you can then spend more time doing the day to day marketing stuff, right? Making sure you're posting fresh content on LinkedIn, making new connections, doing all that stuff. And you think it's not doing anything, but eventually it does. And I actually saw it during the pandemic, 18 months or so. For the first time ever, we got clients that were out of state. Before, they were all just hyper local to our region. But when everybody went home to work from home, it suddenly dawned on all these companies that they don't need an IT firm that's next door. They just need the best one they can find. They remembered seeing my stuff on LinkedIn and we got calls, and we added a bunch of new clients during that period.

Tim Fitzpatrick
From that?

Amy Babinchak
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Sometimes it's really hard to see. You feel like with marketing, you're doing these things and it's not working, but it hasn't had the time it needs. You're planting seeds and it's taking a while for them to grow. I think that's one of the really challenging things with marketing is just being patient enough and thinking long term enough to just believe in what you're doing and continue doing it to give it the time that it needs to work. I think one of the other things that I see where people struggle with consistency is especially nowadays, there's so many marketing channels and so many tactics within those channels. It's just information overload. It's like, I have to have a blog. I got to have a podcast, a YouTube channel. I got to do SEO and email marketing. And the reality is most businesses, you don't need to be everywhere. You've got to create a plan and outline the marketing vehicles that are going to work well for you. You probably need three marketing channels to really be cranking and your business would absolutely transform. Does that mean that you're never going to expand another marketing channel? No, but if you're having a hard time with consistency, trying to focus on five is not the way to do it. It's just too much at once. So I find people who have much better success when they go narrow and deep rather than wide and shallow. And just choose the things that are... I always recommend people start with the things that are already working, fully optimize what's already working, because most of the time what's already working is not fully optimized. That's really low hanging fruit for people. And then just pick what's going to work for you with where you want to get to and what your budget is and focus on those things and give them time. Do you know how long you were doing some of the marketing activities? Once you started really focusing on the engine where you weren't turning the switch on and off. Do you remember how long it took you to start to see some results from some of that stuff, like the social activities that you were doing?

Amy Babinchak
Gosh, it's hard for me to say. I'm going to say it probably was at least a year.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Okay.

Amy Babinchak
It's a while. I would say that it wasn't until I really started to like LinkedIn, enjoy being there, that it started to make a difference because then it wasn't a chore to do it. I wanted to go there and see what was happening. I totally appreciate what you said about going wide because I think if you're not involved, nothing's going to happen. Until last week, I had a Twitter account and my publishing tool would stick things out there, but I never interacted with it. And so nothing ever came of it. It was just noise.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, about a year, depending on the tactic, I always tell people 6 to 12 months. Sometimes it can be longer than that. But these things take time. Now, does that mean after three months that you're not making course corrections and you're just continuing blindly to do the same thing over and over again? No. I think 90 days with marketing is long enough to start seeing, are we getting some traction here? Are some of these things working? What tweaks do we need to make? You're always making tweaks, but it really does take time to start building momentum and that snowball to start rolling downhill and collecting more and more snow. But if after six months you were like, this isn't working, fine. Yeah, it didn't work because you didn't do it long enough, right?

Amy Babinchak
Right.

Conclusion

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you have the patience, which a lot of people don't. Couple more questions to wrap things up here. One is, so where's your focus for 2023?

Amy Babinchak
My focus for 2023 is to continue to do those business networking events. It gives us a great chance to reconnect with our existing clients and then to meet some prospects and hopefully gain some new clients.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it. Double down on what's already working.

Amy Babinchak
Right. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it.

Amy Babinchak
We're planning to do one of those every month this year.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's awesome. I'm sure as you continue to do it, you're just going to continue to learn new things and it's going to get better and better. I love it. Twenty three years, knowing what you know now, is there anything you do differently?

Amy Babinchak
That's a really hard question. I don't know if I would. I have really enjoyed being in business and I'm not sure if I would do anything differently. I really found my niche. I love to work with small business. I love the IT industry, absolutely all aspects of it. Did I make mistakes along the way? Yeah, of course I made mistakes along the way, but I don't have any regrets at all.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Your path has gotten you to this place.

Amy Babinchak
Right. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Amy, this has been a great conversation. I appreciate you taking the time. Where can people learn more about you?

Amy Babinchak
Well, they should go to thirdtier.net and check out what I'm doing there. That is not my MSP, but that is the place where I support other IT professionals. But if you're looking for an MSP, you can talk to me there too.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. I love it. Amy, thank you so much for taking the time. I really appreciate it. It's been a pleasure. Those of you that are watching, listening, I appreciate you as well. Amy has shared a lot of great stuff on her journey and what she's done to grow, accelerate growth, which is all of the stuff that we focus on. If you want to know which of the nine revenue roadblocks are slowing down your growth, you can figure that out at revenueroadblockscorecard.com. In less than five minutes, you'll be able to discover those roadblocks and move forward and start removing those so that you can grow. If you want to connect with us over on our website, you can do that at rialtomarketing.com. That's Rialtomarketing.com. Thank you so much. Until next time, take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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