Learning Lessons From A Two Time Exit Entrepreneur

Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Robert Fitzgerald for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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Learning Lessons From A Two Time Exit Entrepreneur

Tim Fitzpatrick
Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a Revenue Acceleration Series interview where we talk to seven-figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe you must remove your revenue roadblocks if you want to accelerate growth and marketing shouldn't be difficult. Today, I'm super excited to have Rob Fitzgerald from Blue Mantis with me. Rob, welcome and thanks for being here.

Robert Fitzgerald
Tim, thank you for having me. I got to tell you, I'm really excited about today's podcast.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, me too. And by the way, so this is fun. I have never interviewed another Fitzgerald, but when people screw up my last name, they always say Fitzgerald instead of Fitzpatrick.

Robert Fitzgerald
It is the exact same. I am always Rob, Robert, Bob, you name it, Fitzpatrick. Always.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's got to be something like where people knew either a Fitzpatrick or a Fitzgerald, and so they just automatically tie them all to what they knew in the beginning.I don't know, but it's just funny.

Robert Fitzgerald
By the way, how many people call you Fitts or Fittsy? I'm not allowed to be the de facto.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, it's funny. There's a gentleman that I connected with who we did a podcast with, super nice guy. And he was like, Man, you should just go by Tim Fitts. Just, yeah. I mean, depending on who it was, growing up, a lot of people just called me Fits. So, yeah. So funny. So I am excited about this because you have a lot of experience that I think people can learn from. And I want to dig into those things. But before we do that, I want to ask you a few rapid fire questions if you're ready to jump in with both feet.

Robert Fitzgerald
Sure. Let's go.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. So very quickly, what do you do? How long have you been doing it?

Robert Fitzgerald
All right. So I advise organizations on how to implement, enhance, and maintain cybersecurity postures to ensure that they stay secure, their organization stays secure, and quite frankly, they stay compliant or able to be competitive in marketplace. I've been doing this since 2001, through a number of organizations, and an amazing career journey.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So in that time, what's the most important lesson you've learned in running your businesses? Because I know you've had multiple.

Robert Fitzgerald
The number one thing that I will advise everyone on is start with the end in mind. And legitimately, we will talk about this in the two different businesses that I was able to run and sell. But start with the end in mind. Pick a date, three years, five years, 10 years, and build your way back so that you can get where you want to go.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love that. In another way that I think about this, too, because a lot of people have heard this concept of starting with the end in mind. But I think closely tied to that is like, what do you want? You have to clearly define what you want. Otherwise, you end up building a business and go, oh, my God, this is not... This is not what I thought it was going to be.

Robert Fitzgerald
So you've watched my first business, and you've seen, okay, we are going to have a good conversation today.

Tim Fitzpatrick
yeah. Look, you've been in business 2001, right? There are plenty of ups, plenty of downs. Is there any mantra or something motivational that you say to yourself, share with your people to push through those hurdles when they come up?

Robert Fitzgerald
So the most succinct way to say it is this too shall pass. I can tell you unabashedly, I have said, I walked through the valley the shadow of death, I shall not be afraid. Believe me, I was shaking in my boots. Believe me, there have been many, many, many times where I questioned my sanity, where I have felt I was out over my skis. But candidly, this too shall pass, both the bad, the struggle, but also-

Tim Fitzpatrick
And the good.

Robert Fitzgerald
It is like life everything is cyclical, and it takes a lot of confidence, and whatever religion you believe in or don't believe in, faith in yourself and in the world, and trust that people are good.

The Biggest Takeaways from Selling the First Business

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. I love that. So I know in the pre-interview we talked, you've built and sold two companies now. And I'd love to just dig into this a little bit because I think there's a lot of learning lessons that people can take from your experience. So let's start with the Lorenzi Group, which was the first company you started and then sold. Can you share just that journey and your biggest takeaways from selling it?

Robert Fitzgerald
Sure. It was funny. The Lorenzi Group was really interesting. So we were We were in the very early stages of cybersecurity as an industry, as a concept, as an idea. We really specialized in digital forensics, responding to cybersecurity incidents, but our niche was expert witness testimony. And so we were often, I built a company. We were often the organization to get up on the stand and testify in front of judges and juries, and believe me, tribunals, and other types of organizations as well. I think a few lessons that I learned. One, I didn't start with the end in mind. I saw an opportunity. I jumped into a wide open market opportunity and candidly wasn't focused. I didn't understand that I needed to know where I wanted to go, that I needed to be much more in tune with how the market cycle for the industry worked. I built a channel-based business with the Lorenzi Group, really focused on selling only to litigators, our services to litigators of law firms and represented corporations. And I learned a number of hard lessons. One is they control the spickings. If you have just a single channel and a single control group, you reduce the amount of control that you have on sales. And that can have a very negative impact. But because I didn't have really clear goals on where to grow and how we were going to move forward, I was just embracing new technology as it came along. The business languished. And quite frankly, at one point in time, I thought we were just going to close the business and walk away a failure. And that's how I felt. Not that it would have been a failure, but to walk away as a failure. And it took quite a bit of introspection to sit back and think through How do I get out of this mess? And believe me, I was married. I had kids, and my wife was like, What are we doing? You're chasing everything. You're driving or flying. What is this? What happens in this business? We were 23 people big around the country, getting calls in the middle of the night, growing, but with no plan, no real plan to grow.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So it's without a plan, things become very haphazard, right? It's almost like jumping in your car and just not having a destination, right? You're just driving all over the place.

Robert Fitzgerald
Exactly. And that's one of these things, right? You have to start with the end in mind. You have to say... And it'll be really when we talk about the next company, it'll really interesting because when I started the second company, before I could even start the second company, my wife and I had some serious negotiations about what the second company was going to look like. And so when I sold the first company, there was, to an extent, a little bit of relief, but a lot of sadness because I could still see the potential of where we wanted to go and how we wanted to get there. But it made perfect sense to sell at the time that we sold. I mean, really perfect. It fit the family, it fit the business, it fit the market. It was just hard to let go. I fell in love with the business because it was my business, not because of what we were doing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
How did the... Did you manage to turn things around, or did you sell it to someone who wanted to take advantage of what was there and they were going to go from there?

Robert Fitzgerald
We made... Amazingly, we were able to turn it around. We were able to turn it around. We were able to create some technology, some intellectual property, and we were able to, therefore, create value with the organization so that when we sold it, there was something there for the buyer to say, This is great. This is where I want to go. They had bigger, deeper pockets than I did, and they knew from... They had a marketing plan. They had an operational plan. They knew how they wanted to take what we had built and do something with it. That's actually a really interesting point. I see so many business owners that are doing something but can't see that there's additional value to whatever it is that they're doing because they're so locked in here in their purview. In their purview, they miss it. Whereas if they could expand their purview, they would be able to grow in a more controlled, stable, and faster.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. I mean, anybody that's buying it, but most people buying a business, want to see some certain things in place. And they saw some great things within the Lorenzi Group, but they also saw opportunities that they could capitalize on to maximize their return on investment. But one of the things that I want to pull out that you said, because obviously you said in the beginning, Man, I just jumped in and started doing this. I think one of the things that you did really well in the beginning, and we could I'll certainly go around on this if you don't think so, but I think niching and having that specialty did help you get to where you went. And especially when you're an expert witness, You're an expert witness, right? They want you to know what the hell you're talking about. But also because you were an expert witness, you knew exactly who you needed to get in front of. Based on what you said, it sounded like, man, I was at the whim of these litigators, but you knew exactly who you needed to get in front of and network with, because when those opportunities came up for these litigators, they knew exactly who to reach out to.

Robert Fitzgerald
So you are correct on both counts. One of the things that as a technician, I did was not realize the importance of marketing and sales early on. And so I was out building relationships with litigators one at a time within firms, across firms, across state lines, around the country, one at a time. And the reality is, Because that was awesome when it was just one, two, three of us, four of us. But you're not able to scale that way. And I laughed because now when I'm speaking with business owners, I am often asking about, are you working in the business or are you working on the business? What are you doing from a sales standpoint, from a marketing standpoint to drive awareness and make sure that opportunities, leads are coming in and that people in your niche, and it is important to focus on the niche, know who who you are. That's a lesson that you have to learn. You can read it in 100 books, but I think until you actually feel the pain, you have no idea.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. I mean, it's not easy. We often get involved with companies, and there's nothing wrong with growing through referral. But as you point out, well, one, it's not consistent and predictable. It's not something that you can control. So you hit a cap, right? If you want to push through that ceiling, you need to build out a more robust sales and marketing engine to complement that. Because look, referrals close at a very high rate, higher than any other channel, but we've got to expand. The way I think about it is like, if you have a business built 100% on a referral, you're riding a unicycle. The tire goes flat, we got problems. If you've got other marketing channels and you're riding a four wheeler, well, if one of those tires goes flat, you're still going to get to the destination. It might take you a little bit longer, but you're still going to get there. So the other thing I want to pull out that you said, too, is the importance of focusing on sales and marketing, right? And I can't remember who it was. I think it was Dan Kennedy talks about this in the marketing space where it's like, as business owners, we're not cyber security people or dentists or attorneys first, we are sales and marketers, because without that, what we really do doesn't matter because we're not going to have any clients to do it with.

Robert Fitzgerald
That's right.


Tim Fitzpatrick
It's hard. So any last minute thoughts you want to share about selling Lorenz before we move on to your second company?

Robert Fitzgerald
I think if I look back, I either held on to Lorenzi too long or I didn't hold on to it long enough. And again, think of business cycles up and down. And so we were coming back up. We were able to create this IP. We were able to do this. If I had held on to it another three to five years, if I had turned down the buyer, held on to it for another three to five years, that would have been interesting. Candidly, I'm very glad that we sold when we did, but I am haunted by the fact that I didn't have plans. I didn't have an end vision in mind. However, the team I had, great people, and we can talk a little bit about that as well. But the team I had were great people, and I was happy for them when we sold.

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The Biggest Takeaways from Selling the Second Business

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, good. Let's talk about your second company, Arcas. That was recently bought within the last year or so by Blue Mantis. How was this second experience different from the first? What learning lessons did you take away from it this time around?

Robert Fitzgerald
So let's step back a little bit. So I ended up working for a company, later on in my career, I ended up working for a company that was acquired by Green Pages. And in 2020, they were purchased by a private equity firm. And so I left. I told the exec team, I'm going to leave. I'm going to start my own consulting firm, and I have an idea of what we are going to do and how we're going to change the industry, which I can't do here. Well, two years later, Green Pages rebrands becomes Blue Mantis, and in that process, they acquire my company. They come back to me and they say, Hey, How much did you hate working here? And I laughed and I was like, No, I loved it. The team here, I trust the exact team. The people I work with are probably the nicest, truly the nicest people I'd ever worked with. And they're like, We're interested in acquiring you. We're shifting our strategy, our go-to-market strategy. We're bringing in some new executives. We brought in a couple of new practice leaders as well. Would you be interested? I said, It's funny that you say that. I'm speaking to two other organizations right now about acquisition because everyone sees cyber Security as the next market mover in the IT services, IT consulting, technology consulting space. And they said, Give us a couple of days. Don't talk to anyone else. Give us a couple of days. And of course, I knew that. I'm like, Yeah, let's see where this goes. And so the opportunity to rejoin Blue Mantis and to bring in a team of professionals at the caliber that we did was incredibly exciting. Everyone was excited about it on both sides. And it has been in a year, and it was, it's been a year as of February first, it has been an unbelievable ride. It has been a lot of fun. I've had a chance to work with the new CRO that came in, Terry Richardson. I've had a chance to work with my boss who oversees everything security and IT, Jay Fusteris, and his number two in security, Jay Martin, who I've known for a long time to really help create new solutions and go-to-market security first. Everyone in the company thinks about From being a VAR or an IT services reseller to we're coming in and offering you, creating and offering you solutions, providing services on security number one, and business value number two, has It has been a game changer.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Most people who are listening or watching this, you need to know most companies are not built and sold within a two-year time period. So that's one thing that I find fascinating about the second time around is that it happened really quickly. Did you think it was good? Were you planning on it happening that quickly or what happened there?

Robert Fitzgerald
No, this is excellent. Okay, so I can tell you. So before I started on this, my wife and I sat down and we had some significant, very serious negotiations. She was like, I don't want another 15-year company. You were working days, nights. You would go to bed at 1:00 in the morning, wake up at 4:00. I don't want that. That's chaotic. It's not healthy. And she was right. I said, You know what? That's totally fair. I said, Here's the deal. And with her, before I even knew what I wanted to do, before I even wrote a business plan, I sat down with her at the dining room table and we mapped out. I said, Here's my promise. I will sell this company in five years, or I will have this company ready to sell in five years, regardless of whether or not we're making a dollar or we're making 100 million. In five years, we will be able to sell this company. I said, Now, you and I, in four and a half years, may make a decision. I ask you, we negotiated, I ask you, In four and a half years, if I come to you, can you, and it's doing everything we wanted to do, and I'm not working like I was working the first time around, can we maybe keep it? And she said, Yes. She said, Yes. That's a reasonable ask, right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it.Heading your bets.

Robert Fitzgerald
I knew that we were going to sell the company in five years. Quite frankly, one of the things that allowed me to make the moves that I made at Arcas with everything that was going on was our my willingness to be transparent with everyone. Hey, guys, I'm starting this company. I'm looking to bring people on. I'm not sure if it's going to go beyond five years. I've made an agreement with my wife that in five years time, we may sell this company. It's going to be a negotiation, but it will also be up to her to make that decision. Now, we didn't talk about how I would sell this company or who I would sell this company to. I may be able to sell it to you. I may sell it to someone else. Here we go. What happened, though, was the amount of transparency in the the plan, led to transparency in the financials, led to transparency in the sales and marketing strategies and the go-to-market that allowed people to feel comfortable, the employees, to feel comfortable that I was being honest and looking out for their best interests. Because most executives, most businesses don't share that amount of detail, but they knew. I said, I will do everything I can while you're here to make sure you get what you need so that whenever or however you want to move on, I'm there to support you. It was truly a game changer. So we started in early 2020. Covid was still the flu. It wasn't COVID, right? And because of the whole remote-only work, cybersecurity exploded. I was trying to hire people as fast as I could and deliver. And it created, not to say it was a perfect story, but it was just a unique set of circumstances that allowed some really seasoned people to join the team, to be able to say, Hey, you know what? I'm done working in big consulting or at this Fortune 100 company or whatever. I'd love to come and work with you. Our sales pitch was easy. Our sales pitch with Tim was, Hey, We're coming from big consulting or Fortune 100 companies. We've been there and did that. We were targeting the SMB in mid-market. Let us tell you how to avoid the mistakes that you're making. They've made. And with this whole shift of everyone having to be remote, we've all been working remote for years, traveling from client to client or office to office. So we have real world experience around how to do it in a secure manner. And the demand was huge.

Tim Fitzpatrick
There was a wave that you were able to ride, which is great. But at the same time, I want to pull something out that's easy for people to overlook. Because you knew that you wanted to sell in five years, in some way, shape, or form, that was a measuring stick, and it helped you make decisions much easier and much quicker because it's like, Hey, we have a decision that we need to make. Is this going to help us or is this going to hurt us if we want to sell in five years? Yes or no? Answer to that question then dictates what the hell we're going to do.

Robert Fitzgerald
That is a huge, huge point. There's actually a second piece to that. For the first point, it absolutely Absolutely allowed us to make decisions significantly faster. Like, does this matter or no? And if it does, what are we going to do about it? The second thing that we realized really early on is that if we were going to sell, we had to make the business be turnkey, systemize everything. How are you doing this? How do we do this? What do we think about this? And believe me, we made a number of mistakes in creating the systems and whatnot, but we were able to integrate these and grow as we learned more and understood more about the task or the operation or what the client or what the market wanted. And it absolutely helped us accelerate our growth. We go to, originally, the Fent, send an some private financing to say, Hey, this is who we are. This is what we're doing. This is how we are doing it. And some organizations were like, That's crazy. And others were like, This is excellent. Let's move this forward. How do we take the next step? And I think that's more than just being a group of nerds doing consulting. What was most intriguing was the intellectual property that we had created around the systems, around the solutions that we were offering and how we were offering them so that they could be repeatable, how we created. When I was in big consulting, I learned a pattern or a system to train people, which was they watch three times, they lead three times with us, the leader being the second, the second seat, and then they run three times with someone else and with a peer. And we implemented that, and it allowed us to just expand our capabilities across our individuals, seeing significantly faster, and it gave them the confidence to match the most seasoned people that we hired.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. You know what? You touch on something that a lot of A business becomes more valuable when it is not owner-centric. And the only way for it to not be owner-centric is for you to pull yourself out of everything as quickly as possible. And the systems that you put in place allow you to do that. It's almost like it's like somebody buying a franchise. It's like all the systems are there, and there's a playbook. That is a much more valuable thing for somebody to buy rather than an owner-centric business. Because if it's owner-centric and they buy it, what's going to happen? How are they going to transition you out of the business? Nobody wants to buy a business like that. But because you knew that going in, you were able to jump into that as quickly as possible and just like, I can't keep doing this. I need to get out.

Robert Fitzgerald
Exactly. What I realized even further, which I think that during the acquisition period, Blue Mantis was really surprised at the exact team that Blue Mantis was really surprised at, was I had to trust my team, and so therefore, I just trusted my team. And by that, specifically, I would sometimes be asked questions, and I would say, I'm not the right person. And we weren't super large. I'm not the right person. You need to speak with Pete, or you need to speak with Amber, or you need to speak with Hannah, or one of the other people, and they would be like... The question would be, why don't you know that? I would say, because my job is to help on the sales side, to help on the finance side, do the marketing piece. Their job is to build teams of people to do delivery, to handle a delivery. However they get it done, as long as it is acceptable to us as an organization and our clients, the rest of it is up to them because my idea may not meet or even be as good as what they can come up with as their small pods or groups within the organization. And that's hard for a lot of executives, just in general, to realize, my job is not... My job is trying to stay out of your way.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You have to be able to let go of things. So with Arcas, were there some things on the marketing side that you did that worked really well for you? Anything come to mind there?

Robert Fitzgerald
Well, it's funny. There's a number of things that I did. One, I leaned into partnerships hard, hard, hard, hard. I leaned into partnerships. While we did have a number of direct clients that we sold to directly, we also partnered with MSPs, Vars, accounting firms, business management consulting firms to deliver services. That was one thing that-

Tim Fitzpatrick
With partnerships, they were selling and you were basically their back-end. Is that right?

Robert Fitzgerald
They were selling and we were the back-end. On the partnership, they were selling, we were the back-end.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Robert Fitzgerald
There's other types of partners where we were aligned to technologies, certain vendors that we believed in, that we felt we could help capitalize on. That was another way that we looked at partnerships. And then finally, one of our biggest partnerships was with Ingram Micro, which is one of the largest, if not the largest tech distributor. And we dedicated collectively thousands of hours to Ingram Micro, to either helping them with training programs or working with their people. They were great, believe me. I can't say never. It's rarely one thing that's going to bring you success. You have to be willing to do one more, add one more to the fire, keep trying, because you don't know how things are going to break. But on the flip side, as hard as we were working at Arcas, I instituted a rule. When it was time off, it was time off. And there were some exceptions to that. But when you're on nights and weekends, I need you to take a break. And quite frankly, one of the things that we implemented was mandatory vacation time every six months. You had to take five days off. You had to. And we wanted to get to... If we had kept the company we wanted to get to, you have to take at least two weeks off every six months or something. We were figuring it out. But I needed you to take a break, because what I find is that when you respect people's time and when you give them an actual break, they will move mountains for you.

Start Looking for Who You Want to Sell to Today

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So this has been fascinating, Rob. I appreciate you sharing all this. What any advice that you would give, any additional advice, I would say, that you would give to business owners that are thinking or know that they want to sell their business at some point?

Robert Fitzgerald
Okay. If you have a business, and I don't care what industry you're in, I really don't. I talk to hundreds of business owners across a There's a ton of different industries. Start looking for who you want to sell to today. Who do you want to sell to? Why do you think they would want to buy? Start building those relationships today and build them with their competitors, too. If you own a plumbing company and you're thinking, Hey, I'm going to look to retire or I want to sell in three or four years, find some other construction companies, industry companies, trade companies that you could sell the business to and start building those relationships today. If you own a graphic design company or you own a woodworking, it doesn't matter the industry. But if you can do that, opportunities will open up. Because eventually, what happens, Tim, is you find you'll end up talking to competitors. And believe me, in the beginning, everyone's afraid to talk to competitors. Everyone's like, You know what? The pie is so big, and it's only getting bigger as more and more people come into the world, into the country. But what you will find is you can build some amazing relationships and collaborative points where one in one doesn't make two, it makes three. You're delivering real exceptional value to clients. And we have just seen it where opportunities present themselves. Additionally, as difficult as it can be for a lot of people, I think in today's world, transparency is a multiplier. Transparency as an executive as a business owner, as a leader, is a multiplier. And I think that as we grow our business, we want to be thinking about that. And I see that even It's funny. I see. And part of the reason I'm glad we joined Blue Mantis, we sold to Blue Mantis, is the leadership team has a vision. They're clear about it. They're transparent. And we've had Josh Jeanine get and say, yeah, well, that didn't work out. So now we got to go do something else. I mean, to hear an executive actually say, yeah, no, I screwed that one up or that didn't work out, right, is absolutely phenomenal. It is new way of thinking that creates trust and drives loyalty to the organization and creates a spark to further help clients.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that. Those are two things that I don't think most people would have initially thought of or shared. So I appreciate you pulling those those out because the one thing that comes to mind for me, too, when you say start looking for who you want to sell to and build those relationships. I mean, look, the reality is the likelihood that one of those people is going to buy. Who knows? I mean, it's a shot in the dark, but there are people you can reach out to when you're starting to look for buyers, and there's a high chance that they're going to know a buyer.

Robert Fitzgerald
Well, so here's another nugget of wisdom from years of experience. I don't care what business you're in. Friends and family will never buy from you. However, what they can do, and why networking becomes so important, is they can refer you to people that will buy, or refer you to people that will refer you to people that will buy. But friends and family will never, ever buy from you across the board. I mean, you talk to people that own, especially people that own restaurants, or on golf courses or events, they all expect their family and friends to be able to be let in for free. How many pro athletes have we seen talk about like, Oh, you wouldn't believe, I made it to the Super Bowl, or I made it to Wimbleton, or I made it to whatever. My phone blows up with, How many free tickets can I get? And yet no one's ever bought one of their shirts. However, It's that they bring when you're networking and you're helping people, there's a thing called inferred trust. You and I have a relationship, Tim. When I refer someone to Rialto, what's going to happen is the inferred trust when you go and talk to them is going to be significant, and they're going to be like, Hey, if Fitsy likes Fitsy, maybe Maybe this makes sense. It's maybe a Sully.

Conclusion

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it. So, Rob, knowing what you know now, is there anything that you would do differently? You've shared a lot of good stuff, so I appreciate that.

Robert Fitzgerald
So I think... If you're ever in the fortunate position to be able to sell a company, and it doesn't matter whether or not you stay on or you don't stay on. It matters maybe more if you do stay on. If you're ever in that situation, learn to reset your expectations. Everything that you've set up, our kiss was my baby. Everything that I set up, the visions and ideas that I have, I lose them the second I sign my name on the dotted line. Blue Mantis has a vision, they have an idea, and yeah, we're aligned on that. But how they want to execute on that, what that looks like for my team, it all goes away. And there are times that I'll be sitting and talking with Josh or the CEO or my boss is the CISO, CISO, Jay Pesteris. And I'm like, and they said, Rob, it's not your business anymore. And they're right. They're 100 % right. Jerry will pull me aside. He'll be like, just reset your It's time for you to reset your expectations. Absolutely. And I get it. Those guys have been working together for years and years, and they know what they're doing, and they've brought in some great people. And don't worry. Relax. We got you. But it's hard to let go. It's hard to see... As parents, we expect that at 18 or 20 or 25, our baby birds are flying away to start their own thing. It's hard to see your baby become morphed into a larger organization.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. It's a great piece of advice because the buck no longer stops with you. And you got to let that go..

Robert Fitzgerald
I don't have no video power with me anymore. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got to let it go. I love it. Rob, thank you so much for taking the time to share your experience. I've enjoyed catching up with you again. Where can people catch up with you?

Robert Fitzgerald
Oh, absolutely. One, you can reach me at Blue Mantis. You can reach me on LinkedIn, Rob Fitzgerald. I am on Twitter at Ravici, R-A-V-I-C-I. I I love to talk business. I love to talk about value creation. I even like to talk about cybersecurity now and then.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, cool.

Robert Fitzgerald
Tim, thank you for having me. This was awesome. This was really, really awesome stuff.

Tim Fitzpatrick
My pleasure. And thank you. If you guys want to connect with Rob, please do that. Go over to Blue Mantis or look him up on LinkedIn. We will make sure that stuff is in the show notes. Those of you that are watching, listening, appreciate you doing so. If you want to connect with us, you can do that over at rialtomarketing.com, or you can head on over to revenueroadblockscorecard.com. And over there, you can identify which of the nine revenue roadblocks is slowing down your growth. Takes less than five minutes. So go check it out. Rob, thank you. Audience, thank you. Until next time. Take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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