Leveraging Existing Clients To Drive Growth

Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Nathan Whittacre for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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Leveraging Existing Clients To Drive Growth

Tim Fitzpatrick
Welcome to the Rialto Marketing Podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven-figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly so you can learn from their experience. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing where we believe you must remove your revenue roadblocks to accelerate growth and get where you want to go faster. Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. I am really excited to have Nathan Whittacre from Stimulus Technologies with me today. Nathan, welcome and thank you for being here.

Nathan Whittacre
Thanks. It's great to be here, Tim.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, I'm looking forward to digging into this with you. You've got such an interesting story, like so many entrepreneurs. But before we do that, I want to ask you a few rapid-fire questions, help us get to know you a little bit. Are you ready to jump in?

Nathan Whittacre
Let's do it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Very quickly, what do you do? How long have you been doing it?

Nathan Whittacre
I'm the CEO of Stimulus Technologies. I started the business with my brother, my dad, in 1995, so over 28 years of running the business. We are a technology service provider. We have two sides of our company. On one side, we do IT services for other businesses, take care of their networks, security, infrastructure, everything related to their computer systems. Then we're also an internet service provider that we provide high speed internet connectivity where other providers don't want to go mostly rural areas. Anything around technology, we focus on.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. 28 years, plenty of learning experiences in there. What's the most important lesson you've learned?

Nathan Whittacre
Oh, man, it's always hard to narrow it down to one, right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, it is.

Nathan Whittacre
That's going to be my favorite thing. I'd say two, if you give me the option to say two.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. Go for it.

Nathan Whittacre
Is a piece of advice that my dad gave me when we started the business. He said things always cost twice as much and take twice as long than what you think. And say, he's slightly wrong on that. It usually is four times as much and four times as long. But certainly you have all the best plans and things always cost more and take longer than you want. So that's the first lesson. And then the second lesson as an entrepreneur, you have to fake it till you make it. You think you know what you're doing, and a lot of times you just have to put on a good fase and push through difficult times. Those are the two pieces of advice that I've learned in our business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. So 28 years, we're putting plenty of ups and downs there too. Do you have any mantra or something motivational you say to yourself, share with your team to push through those times when you're running up against roadblocks?

Nathan Whittacre
So a while ago, I read this article about the isolation of the CEO. Sometimes those around you don't know what's on the owner and the CEO of the business. And there's times that I start my day out, and it's just like the burden of running the company is so heavy. And I heard this guy that came in and spoke to one of the conferences I went to that he repeated this mantra, and I've taken it on to myself. And before you start your day, if you're having a bad day or feeling down, you have to put on a show. And so he says, it's show time. Just I'd say that over and over again to remind yourself that you have to carry on a different fase inside your business. If you're always gloom and the weight of the business is always on you, you can't motivate your team. So I have to do that. Just whether it's in my car or behind my desk or doing something I don't necessarily want to do, I'll just repeat that over and over again. I usually yell it pretty loud.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's show time. I love it. That's a great one. Sometimes it's just the simplest things that just help us get through and push through. I like that one. That's a really simple mantra, too.

Running a Business with Family

Tim Fitzpatrick
So, Nathan, you mentioned this. I want to dig into this a little bit. You started the company with your dad and your brother. I've worked with my dad for over 10 years. It was one of the most amazing experiences I have been through, especially professionally. But it was interesting for me because I saw a side to my dad that I did not see growing up at all. And so it was really nice to be able to see that and share that with him. But tell me about what was it like for you working with them and any recommendations for others that are thinking about working with family?

Nathan Whittacre
So family could be up and down, right? You carry a lot more as a long tail behind you with family than you do with a business partner or employees or whatever it may be. When I started the company, I was a baby. I was a senior in high school. I didn't know anything about business. My dad had ran a couple of businesses, and entrepreneurship was really part of our family from his experience, running a couple of businesses, I cleaned toilets in his office when I was four or five years old, so I felt that as a family growing up. My brother and I didn't have a lot of experience running a business, but we had a desire to. We really relied on my dad for understanding financials and making business decisions. My dad was never really involved in the business. He came in for a couple of years towards the end of his career to help us put together some sales and marketing side of it of the company. I was able to work with him on a full-time basis for a few years and really helped us understand systems and processes around the sales side, which is what he did a lot of. And it really set us off in that period of time, about 15 years ago to put systems in place to manage sales and marketing team. So I really appreciate that, and it was a great experience working with him. My brother and I worked together for a few years at the beginning, and then he actually left the company in 2002, so over 20 years ago, because we had written a software package that he went off to manage a new company that we formed together to sell that software, which was not a core business that we wanted to focus on as stimulus. We often talk business with each other. I was part of his business for quite a few years. He was still part of mine, but we respectively bought each other out of the companies. But it's still fun. He still operates his company, I still operate mine, and it's sharing the war stories together on what it is to grow a business and the difficulties that we face. We face them a little bit differently, but a lot of the problems in business are exactly the same. It's also really cool. We're an entrepreneur family. My sisters own a company, both of my sisters have owned companies, and just talking to them and just the things that happen to business are so interesting because they often happen to everybody. And so being in a family of entrepreneurs and business owners is both stressful because being an entrepreneur is stressful, but it's also fun. It's very relatable. It's also amazing. My wife is also a small business owner, so her and I have a lot in common we can talk about too. And having that close relationship with those around me that understand what it means, understand how scary it is sometimes to operate a business, it gives that assurance that you get through those tough times.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Did you ever have times where you or your dad or your brother didn't see eye to eye? I mean, were there were there some times where it was tough?

Nathan Whittacre
Absolutely. I mean, I think that's what often happens in family businesses is either you see eye to eye exactly or you don't. And we're all a dominant family, all of us that have our wrong opinions, and we're all a little stubborn. And so there's definitely were times that we would dig our feet in and argue. But we always came to a good conclusion about whatever it was. And we would go back and we have family dinners every Sunday and still get together and enjoy our time with each other even if we are having difficulties in the business. That's something that we were able to work through, especially as we were operating the company together, making those decisions. So it is definitely, I know some families don't have any arguments. Okay, I don't know any families that don't have any arguments. But it's just important to talk to them and resolve them, and that's what we were able to do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I think you touched on it. Just being able to separate business from personal, super, super important. I was fortunate. My dad and I rarely got into any disagreements. I think part of that was just him. I'm not taking a lot of credit for that and just his ability to manage and lead. But it was also we just tended to think really similarly when it came to a lot of business things. We didn't butt heads a lot. But one of my best friends worked for me for a long time as well. And that was obviously, I think it was a lot harder for him because I was the one managing him. But again, we just agreed like, hey, what happens here is not going to impact our friendship and what we do outside. And we were both able to just separate things. I would say he was much better at it than I was. But, man, if you can make that work, working with people that you're really close to, I think can be a pretty amazing experience if it's good, right? If it's bad, then I guess not.

Nathan Whittacre
I've seen it both ways with our clients that are family businesses, and some of them turn out really good, and it's amazing. And some of them you feel attention at times going into their offices. You see all of it. You see all of it. And it's interesting. My brother in his business, he started it with his best friend. They were co-op, this software package. And they're best friends. They live across the street from each other. They vacation as families together, and they work together every day and it's an interesting dynamic. So it's great for them. Yeah. It's very positive.

Hiring an In-house Marketing Team

Tim Fitzpatrick
So one of the things we talked about, Nathan, in the pre-interview was we talked a little bit about marketing and you had mentioned that you had first hired a marketing assistant back in 2012. And I know your marketing has evolved since then, but can you share with us how you made that first decision to hire in-house and how your marketing efforts and your team have evolved over time?

Nathan Whittacre
So I'm an avid reader. I often say I did not learn anything about running a business in college. I went to school for computer science, and they did not have any business classes in computer science. They taught me sales or marketing or human resources or financials, none of that. So everything I've learned has been either from coaches or books or different things that I've seen working with clients. So I wanted to continue growing our business. We had been growing mostly by referrals, and I knew that we were to a point that the referrals were not sufficient. I had read a little bit, like, E-Myth Revisited was one of the books that I read that I really liked. There was a few other books, a few other speakers that I listened to that talked about investing in the company and moving away from just this referral source of business. I realized that I needed to make a change inside the company and focus on getting our name out there to specifically targeted companies in the marketplace and made the decision to hire a marketing assistant to help us with that. Really to better position ourselves. Support me as the primary salesperson also inside the company as I was meeting with clients of preparing materials and quotes and things like that. That's what we made the decision in 2012 is hiring that position. I went back recently and I was looking at a lot of the blog articles and things that we started doing over 10 years ago. And it was just a flurry of activity that allowed us to position ourselves both from an authoritative standpoint and also getting into the marketplace with materials that we could present properly to clients. And it's definitely evolved dramatically over the last 11 years, but it's very similar direction that's allowed us to grow over that same time. I'm very grateful for that opportunity that made that decision to have somebody help. Sometimes I think in business, we often don't know our limitations, and our own limitations or would hold us back, and we're unwilling to hire when maybe we don't have the financial capability to do it or feel like, Well, we don't know how to manage that part of the business. I didn't know anything about marketing other than what I'd read, but I knew that I needed somebody with some more expertise to drive it than I did. That's really the direction we went is I needed help, I needed... I didn't want to... We weren't the size that we could hire a full director or marketing or a chief marketing officer or something like that, but I needed some help. And having that dedicated person inside the company really brought us the first level, and then we've just grown since then.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you hired that person full-time?

Nathan Whittacre
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And do you remember how much top line revenue you were doing at that point?

Nathan Whittacre
Somewhere just over a million dollars in revenue. Probably like a million, million two.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Good. Thank you for sharing that. Because you know what? Like you touched on, it's really hard for a lot of people to make that jump and really determine, gosh, when do I need to do this? But it sounds like one, you... It sounds like you made this decision before you really hit the ceiling, but you saw that ceiling coming where it was like, We need to grow. Referrals are only going to get us so far, and they're not scalable. They're not predictable. If we want to grow more consistently and more predictably, we need to start investing in marketing. Nothing wrong with referrals, but we need to branch out, right? And were you at that point? So it sounds like at that point, you weren't necessarily doing a lot of other marketing other than just referrals.

Nathan Whittacre
We hadn't been to date. I mean, we've done a smattering of things here and there. Obviously, we had a website. We had different things that most businesses did 15 years ago. I mean, heck, we had a YellowPage ad at one point. Not that we do that anymore, but there was different things that we tried over the years. But none of them were really terribly effective other than just doing good work and getting referrals from clients or trusted partners. We had a few partners that we worked with, like a CPA that would send us quite a few referrals that we did business for. But other than that, it was mostly friends, family, and referrals.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, I would even argue that today, compared to 2012, you don't even have to make as big of a leap as you made at the time. With the advent of all the freelance economy and virtual assistants, there are so many different options to hire marketing specific virtual assistants. Even if you don't need that person full-time to just start doing some of that activity, right? But I think the biggest challenge at that point when you hire somebody is who's going to manage them and who's going to guide them and make sure that they have what they need to be successful. And in some cases, as the owner, you can do that. And in some cases, it's not your thing, right? And so you may need to bring somebody else in to help guide and manage that person. But the options are there and you don't have to jump in with both feet and just hire somebody full-time at this point. So tons of options. If you're in the same place that Nathan was in 11 years ago, don't be afraid to make the jump. At least in my experience, whenever I have hired somebody, I've always had a little bit of hesitancy. But after I made the hire, I always wondered what the hell I did before I had them.

Nathan Whittacre
That's certainly. Certainly. It's interesting, I think on the marketing front, this is my perspective, though, is I don't think the owner can ever take a 100 % back seat because really marketing is about sending yourself and your company in the marketplace. And so if the owner or at least the leadership team has to set the vision of what marketing looks like and how to position yourself. And that was one of the hardest things for me as the marketing assistant or as marketing has evolved for us, answering those questions, what is our marketing assistant? What's our target market? What do we want for a client? How do we position ourselves in the marketplace? Those are questions I've had to answer. I haven't been able to outsource that to anybody else other than me because that's defining what I want our company to look like, what I want our clients to look like, what I want our services to be. And if I don't take a proactive approach to that and define what I want that, then somebody else is going to be doing it, and then suddenly it doesn't look like my company anymore. We're selling stuff and doing stuff that I don't necessarily want to do, and it doesn't position ourselves right in the marketplace.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I agree with you, Nathan. I think you, as the owner, whether you have a Marketing Manager or a full-time marketing executive or even if you've outsourced it to a part-time or fractional CMO, you still need to be involved in that. They need to understand your vision and where you want things to go. But I think that leader can also put the plan together to carry out that vision that you want. And they can also highlight some of the blind spots that you might have as an owner. Because we all have them. We're too close to it. And when we bring somebody outside in, they tend to see things a little bit more objectively and they can bring visibility to those blind spots because once we know where blind spots are, then we can... That's where a lot of opportunity exists. But I totally agree with you. As an owner, I think you need to be still involved from a strategic standpoint and a vision standpoint of where you want things to go. But it's just, man, it's so hard. When you look at everything you have from an executive standpoint, whether it's marketing, sales, finance, operations, man, we can't be Jacks of all trade, right? As business owners. And so at some point, we have to loosen up the reins and bring somebody else in that does this day in, day out. But we still need to guide them, right?

Nathan Whittacre
Right. Yeah, it's got to be the owners or the CEO's vision, but developing that team around you to execute on it, I think, is essential. So I agree with that a hundred %.

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Finding Ideal Clients as a Challenge

Tim Fitzpatrick
You talked a little bit about target market and ideal clients. One of the things you mentioned to me was finding ideal clients exactly when they're ready to buy is a challenge. And by the way, this is a challenge for a lot of people. You are not in this boat alone. I'm curious, what types of things are you doing to try and overcome that?

Nathan Whittacre
So in our industry, a lot of times... Well, I think in any business, you have an existing service provider. So usually there's an incumbent IT provider, whether it's in-house IT or outside IT, there's somebody out servicing a company. And so they might be doing a fine job, they might not be doing a great job, but there might be a certain pain to change that out. In IT, there's a significant pain that comes with changing an IT vendor. And I'm very understanding of that. It's a lot of time invested to gather passwords, gather information, maybe swap out systems, and it's disruptive on organization. To bring in a new client, they've had to hit a certain pain threshold with their current provider that led them to them. A lot of times it's usually a security challenge. They had a cyber attack or a ransomware event or something like that that their current service providers failed them and fail to respond properly. But we don't know when that's going to happen. Obviously, we're not... We don't get a phone call from the hackers and say, hey, I'm going to hit XYZ company next week. I want to have a call. That would probably be a bad way for us to do it, collusion with hackers. So one thing that we do is we send out regular information, whether that's we do monthly webinars that we're sending out information. We have weekly little short newsletters that we send out. They're very short, one or two paragraph, text-based emails that get sent out via email to our farm lists. We send out physical letters and white papers and things, whether it's by FedEx or by regular USPS, we send that out on a regular basis. And of course, the digital side of things with social media and AdWords, have a good SEO presence. So when they're ready, they're like, Oh, who's that guy that sent me that weird letter a week ago? Or, Oh, my goodness, that email that they sent two weeks ago about a cyber attack, that just happened to me. Let me give them a call and find out. So it's just trying to stay top of mind with these prospects because we don't know when they'll need us, but we want to be the first one that they call if they do. And rather than doing a quick Google search on their part, I want them to think, okay, this is the guy that's sending me this good information that I've read or I've been to a webinar, or I've seen him at a networking event or part of the Chamber of commerce that I belong to. We try to be as present as possible so that when they do need us, they call us first.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I want to pull some things out because you knocked that one out of the park. But I think there are some easy things to overlook for people. And I can't remember... It depends on where you get the staff, but it's like less than 10 % of any given audience is ready to buy at any point in time. So knowing that that's the case, how do you stay in front of people and… One, what you touched on, you're thinking long term. You are staying in front of people on a consistent, regular basis, over time, so that they think of you. I was in residential real estate for a while, and when I first got into residential real estate, one of the things that I was told was, look, if you are not in the top two people that they think of, you are never going to get the business. Honestly, I think that's relevant to almost any industry. If you are not in that top two, maybe three, it's not going to happen. So we want to stay in front of people, like you said, so that when the problem becomes great enough or the need becomes great enough, they think of you and they're not going out. They're reaching out to you first and foremost. So you have the first event. Everything that you're doing is just I'm just staying in front. I'm continuing to add value. I want them to remember me so that when the pain is there, it's there. Because we can't artificially manufacture the pain or the need, right?

Nathan Whittacre
No, we should not either.

Tim Fitzpatrick
No, we should not.

Nathan Whittacre
We could bring it to attention. Certainly what the threats are, what the different things, why they should go with us versus maybe the current provider, but we're not going to manufacture that threat.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I totally agree. And if you try to do that, you're just going to bang your head against the wall. It's just painful. So long term, consistent, and just stay in front of people. And the other thing that you're doing, too, is you're taking a very multichannel approach. You're using email, which is a great way to stay in front of people. You're using direct mail. Offline marketing still works. A lot of people don't think about it, but it still works incredibly well. You've got your monthly webinar. What else am I missing? You're creating content, you're posting on social. So you're people from multiple avenues. Some of those channels may resonate better with others, but you're taking a multichannel approach, doing a consistently thinking long term, super, super important. That's how you stay in front of people and be there when the need arises. So thank you for sharing that.

Consistency as the Biggest Driver of Growth

Tim Fitzpatrick

So if you had to single out one thing, what would you say has been the biggest driver of your growth?

Nathan Whittacre
I think consistency. We've never knocked it out of the park. We've never doubled our revenue in a year. We're just generally consistently 15-20% growth per year. That's, for me, I think consistency has been the best part of growing the company. It's something manageable that we've been able to do and we have a wide variety of clients. Twenty-eight years, we've been through the dot com burst. We've been through the recession. We're in Las Vegas. Las Vegas was hit dramatically in 2008 and again with COVID. We've gone through a bunch of downturns in the economy, but because we've had a diversity of clients and consistent growth, we've been able to get through those times. That's probably the biggest thing. The other thing we've done, which I haven't mentioned today, we have grown by acquisition. Some of our biggest growth times have been acquiring and moving into new markets through acquisition. I look at those as different than our traditional organic growth. We're still trying to grow 15, 20 % organically and then have these big add-ons with our acquisitions that we do. And those bring their own challenges too but that's what we've been doing. It's consistency. You want that... I often say I want that golden egg that always suddenly pop out with millions of dollars, but it doesn't exist. It takes a lot of hard work. There's no magic bullet to solve this other than just consistency.

Tim Fitzpatrick
The other thing too that I think a lot of people don't realize if you haven't been in a company that's extremely high growth, growing rapidly, hey, it's fun, but damn, it can be a roller coaster ride because it is so... When you're growing that fast, the distribution company that my dad and I owned with other partners, we grew an average of 60 % a year for nine years. When you're growing that fast, it's really hard to see what's coming at you because it's coming so fast you can't always anticipate. So you end up reacting to a lot of things rather than being proactive. And that's not to say that you can't be proactive about a lot of things. You can, but it's like driving a car down the freeway compared to driving a Formula 1 car down a racetrack. So 15-20 % growth consistently, it's just it's comfortable. It's not easy, but you can see things more clearly, I think, and anticipate what needs to be done with that growth. So probably creates a lot less stress. There's still stress, right? But not quite as much. So in 15, 20 % year over year growth consistently is absolutely phenomenal. So you're doing plenty of things right.

Nathan Whittacre
I would say the other thing that we've done and worked hard at doing is nurturing our existing clients because sometimes we want to get new clients. That's what we think about for growth. But we have a lot of clients that can have additional services. We add new services on as a company. We just recently added our cybersecurity services on about two years ago. Cross-selling and upselling existing clients is a big part of our growth. We have a much larger account management team than we do a sales team that allows us to meet with our clients, find out what business problems they're having that we can solve with technology and better implement services inside of their companies, which is a win-win for both sides. Help them better their business and help us grow with them. That's one of the things that's been a big growth factor for us too, is just consistent contact with our existing clients. We use our marketing side of things to do that. A lot of the farming that we do is to existing clients to stay top of mind with them. I think that's probably the other thing, I know I hate the single-thing questions, but that's probably the other biggest driver of our growth has been existing clients and focusing inward rather than just always I got to get the next big client is finding additional revenue sources from existing revenue.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I'm glad you brought that up, Nathan, because you're spot on, man. So many of us just focus on new leads, new leads, new clients. When it is, it's much easier. It's not to say that it's easy, but it's much easier. It's much more effective. It doesn't cost as much. Your conversions are higher when you can work with people that you already have a relationship with. So yeah, digging deep to find opportunities within your existing client base is a huge growth driver that so many people overlook. So thank you for sharing that.

Nathan Whittacre
That's one of the things when we're valuing businesses that we've acquired, one of the things we look at is churn rates and client attrition. If you see a high attrition, high churn, that's scary from an exit strategy for somebody's going to pay you less for your business. If you're growing at 50, 60%, but you're having to replace 100% of your clients every year, that's a tough business to sustain. But if you're growing consistently at 15, 20 %, 10 % even, and you have less of 5% churn, that's a much healthier business too, and you're going to get higher valuation for that. So that's been a big part of us is ensuring... You're always going to have churn. Clients are going to go out of business, they're going to get bought out, they're going to not... Management might turnover and they might bring in somebody else. They might bring services in-house, who knows? So you always have to replace clients. But minimizing that as much as possible is, I think, essential for growth, too, and the health of the business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. If churn is too high, you got other issues in your business that need to be addressed. Marketing is not going to solve that problem. Marketing and sales is not going to solve that problem.

Conclusion

Tim Fitzpatrick
So what are your aspirations for the future? What's next for Stimulus Technologies?

Nathan Whittacre
So we're going to take over the world.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. I love it.

Nathan Whittacre
So we just... Stimulus just acquired another company up in Oregon. So we're now in five states, continue growing. We try to expand our service offerings in different states that we move into. That's a big... Growing geographically is a big part of it, and then growing our service footprint in the different areas that we go into. I'm very excited. For the last year and a half, I've been writing a book. And so in October, my book is finally published. And that's an exciting part for me because I'm sharing my vision for how technology is to work in clients, but also helping companies use technology better. So the book is the CEO's Digital Survival Guide, and it's really focused on business owners and how to use technology inside their companies and just giving an overview and really a reference manual to use that. And so it's shifting to authoritative marketing inside our company. So I aspire to teach other people and help other people through that thought leadership and authority.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome.

Nathan Whittacre
Lots of different things.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Congratulations ahead of time. I've never written a book, but the people I know who have written them say it's a lot of work.

Nathan Whittacre
It is.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So knowing what you know now, anything you'd do differently?

Nathan Whittacre
I don't like looking back that much, but I would probably say going back to the first advice that I shared about things take twice as long and cost twice as much as taking that advice more often. I've definitely been impatient in my business over the years. And so probably the biggest thing is making sure that I'm being consistent without moving on to the next thing. I do have a bit of, I think people refer to it as CEO, ADHD, or chasing out the latest squirrel that's out there. And so I've had to learn to be consistent. And not just chase after the latest and greatest thing. And so I'm often reminded of that. I've done better at it the last five or 10 years than I did towards the beginning of the company. We were just always chasing after the next bot rather than focusing on what we're really good at. And so that would probably be the biggest thing I do differently is just finding our focus, our niche of where we can serve, and just doing that consistently well, I think would have proved better in the beginning. Hopefully, I've learned that lesson and I just have to keep reminding myself of it as we move forward.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Nathan, thank you so much, man. I appreciate you taking the time. Where can people learn more about you?

Nathan Whittacre
You can visit our website, StimulusTech.com. I'm also active on LinkedIn. If you guys are interested in networking with me, you can find me on linkedin/nathanwhittacre. And happy to connect with any of you. And look out for my book that's coming out. It's already on Amazon for pre-order, so that would be another way to get some information about me and my company. It's searching up my name. I'm on Amazon, and that would be a great way to connect.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. Stimulustech.com, Nathan Whittacre, and it's W-H-I-T-T-A-C-R-E. So we'll make sure those get in the show notes. But, Nathan, thank you so much for taking the time. I really appreciate you sharing your experience. I've been writing notes down. Hopefully everybody else is too.

Nathan Whittacre
Thanks, Tim.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Those of you that are watching, listening, I appreciate you as well. If you want to connect with us at Rialto Marketing, you can do that over at rialtomarketing.com. Nathan and I talked a lot about sales, marketing today. If you want to accelerate growth, you got to remove your revenue roadblocks. Over at revenueroadblockscorecard.com, you can assess which of the nine revenue roadblocks are slowing down your growth. It takes less than five minutes, so go check it out. Thank you again. Until next time. Take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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