Outsourcing Marketing To The Right Partner

Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Aida Keehner for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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Outsourcing Marketing To The Right Partner

Tim Fitzpatrick
Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe you must remove your revenue roadblocks to accelerate growth and marketing shouldn't be difficult. Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. I am really excited to have with me today, Aida Keehner from Atruent. Aida, welcome and thank you so much for taking the time.

Aida Keehner
Thank you, Tim. I'm really, really appreciative that you invited me along.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, thank you for bearing with me. I know you ran into some hurdles booking the interview, and you did it a couple of times to make sure it came through. So thank you for your patience on that.

Aida Keehner
Absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Before we dig into it, I want to ask you a few rapid fire questions. Hope people get to know you just a little bit here. First one is just very quickly, what do you do and how long have you been doing it?

Aida Keehner
We are an MSSP. MSSP stands for Managed Security Service Providers. So we are essentially the outsource IT Department for businesses where we provide cyber security, remote, proactive, also on site IT, including help desk. Been doing it... I mean, the company started, I founded this in 2009. How long have I personally been doing it? Over 35 years.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, yeah. Time flies, doesn't it?

Aida Keehner
Time definitely flies. But I feel like I'm getting younger.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. What's the most important lesson you've learned so far in running your business?

Aida Keehner
Trust in your people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Since 2009, well, frankly, certainly in the last 35 years, there's been ups and downs. We all know growing a business can be really challenging sometimes, but it can also be super rewarding. Do you have any mantra or something motivational that you say to yourself, share with your team to push through those times when you hit roadblocks?

Aida Keehner
Yes. The mantra trust. The reason why the mantra is trust is because I believe that any relationship is based on that very fact trust, whether the personal, whether the business related. The very name of our company, which is Atruent, is a trustworthy enterprise with a few letter of each words. So trust is in everything.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I really like that. Not to go down a rabbit hole here, but do you believe with trust, do you give trust in the beginning or is trust earned?

Aida Keehner
I think it's a give and take process. You give it, you get it back. The truth about trust is once you have it, it takes a lifetime to maintain it. Once it's broken, it takes another lifetime to get it back if you ever do.

Outsourcing Marketing To The Right Partner

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, it's really hard to get back once you break it. So as you mentioned, Ida, you've been in business since 2009, but your business really took off about three years ago. Can you share what happened, what changed there?

Aida Keehner
Yes. What changed is a personal life changing event reshifted my mindset to concentrate more on my business. And the life changing event is I got divorced. When I was married, I was probably devoting 60 to 70 % of my time in my marriage. And the rest in my business. When the marriage dissolved, it was 150, sometimes 200 % of my time into my business. I devoted every fiber of my being into it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
In addition to just the time that you were focused on the business, were there specific things that you changed at that time or decided, Okay, based on this change, these are the things that I need to focus on to change the course of my business?

Aida Keehner
Yes. Since we like talking about marketing here, one of the things that I've done. Even though I did do some marketing in the early 2015 and 2016, I became really serious about all of my marketing effort around that time because I realized that before being a business owner, I'm a network engineer, that's my trade. I realized I needed help. I couldn't do everything by myself. And that's the reason why marketing became a huge component of our organization.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And at that time, did you choose to outsource marketing immediately? Did you have thoughts of bringing it in house? How did that materialize?

Aida Keehner
I actually never once did I thought about bringing somebody internally. And the reason being, it's like eating my own food. Since I'm an outsource IT department, it made sense to get a company to outsource this entire department.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. And how much did you... How did you go about finding the company that you eventually chose to work with, which you're still working with today?

Aida Keehner
Right. So I worked with two. The first one, when I started it, when I started getting my feet wet into the marketing aspect of things, was in 2015, 2016. The funny story about the first marketing company that I used is that I'm relationship driven. Everything I do is based on relationship, hence the word trust. You build relationship based on trust. Once you have the trust, the relationship solidifies and then you end up doing business with those people. So I always start any relationship I do by developing the relationship and then I end up working with them, which is exactly what I did with the first marketing company and the second marketing company. So the first marketing company was instrumental in our rebranding effort. If I may, probably like what you said earlier, veer off from the discussion, when I started the true in 2009, it was not called Atruent. First of all, 2009, I had no business starting a business because I had no idea how to start a business. I just googled how do you start a business. And around that time, the yellow pages were still around. And I figured I need to pick a name that's going to be in the first pages. So the legal name of the company is actually about computing and consulting, LLC. Still the legal name today. Atruent is the DBA.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Aida Keehner
And when I started engaging, so of course, I did what most business owners do. They build their own website using... I don't even remember if that software still exists. You may remember if you name a few, but I used something very... Probably some kid could use to build a web page. Which was absolutely horrible. And I designed my own logo at the time. It was an A with two Cs. And then eventually I became friends with... Actually, I just had lunch with him today because we still have a very good relationship together, even though we're not working together. And when I told him that, Okay, we need to do something about this website. We need to do something about marketing. What do you suggest? So he had what we can call a war room when he put all of his creative minds together. And he interviewed me multiple times and asked me the most relevant question that still resonates with me today, which was, what do you really care about? Which is like the question that you asked originally. And I said, trust. Trust is in my core being. I have to be able to trust people to do business with them and vice versa. And he gave me a couple of names, and he's the one who came up with Atruent and that logo. So the branding was very much the first IT company that I worked... I mean, the marketing company that I worked with. And when he gave me the word with, I had a branding book and he gave me this full proposal. And when I looked at the word the truth and I said, What does that mean? And he said, A trustworthy enterprise. I loved it so much that it took off from there. And that was around 2015. Eventually, I moved on about three, four years ago to a different marketing company, which took my marketing effort to the really next level when I really started getting serious.

Tim Fitzpatrick
The second company that you're currently working with, what are they doing for you? Just describe how that relationship works.

Aida Keehner
Oh, my God. So we talk every week. We have a recurring meeting. Not only they are my marketing company, they're also my CMO. They are an intricate part of our organization. Even in the organization chart, we don't make big decision without their input and vice versa. So the efforts, most people, and I'm sure you hear that a lot, confuse marketing with website design, which is so much more than just website design. Yeah, website design is one component of putting whatever it is that you do out there on the web. But when it comes to marketing, when it comes to social media, when it comes to marketing campaign, when it comes to the drip campaigns, when it comes to your LinkedIn post, all of your engagement, the trade shows that you have to participate, the webinar recording, they do all of that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
One of the things you said, which I think is super easy to overlook, is you don't make marketing decisions without talking to them. So what I'm gathering from that is that you really view them as a partner, an advisor. If there's something that's happening marketing wise, you are going there and talking to them about it. You are not making decisions and then going to them.

Aida Keehner
Absolutely. Something as simple to give you an idea. Something as simple when we got our first company van, I said, I'm about to get a company van. How should we design it? They're the one who designed the whole wrap on the company van, the message on the company, because it has to be consistent. It doesn't make sense for me to do something behind their back, which is not going to align to the message that they're trying to put out there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, it's not cohesive.

Aida Keehner
No.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right. And I think that that is a that's a mistake that many business owners make is they don't really view the people that they're working with from a marketing standpoint as partners and advisors. They just look at them as vendors, which, frankly, in some cases they are. I mean, a lot of marketing agencies are not digging into the strategic and the chief marketing officer side, like yours. Yours is acting as your marketing leader, but they're also handling the implementation and execution work, which is not always the case. I think it's really important to know who you're working with and what role they're playing because that's going to help determine how you work with those people. But you have a very clear understanding of what they do, the role they play, and I think that's one of the reasons why it works so well. You're meeting with them weekly. They're an integral part of your team, even though they're outsourced. And that's it.

Aida Keehner
Yeah. I know I keep repeating the same word over and over again, but because I trust them implicitly, and they trust me implicitly, so that the synergy is so great when we work together, which is why I think the key word, you nailed it when you said it's a true partnership. And that's exactly it. Because if I look at the prospect of client that work with us, we are not the IT vendor, we are the IT partner. And that is a huge difference.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. It's a mindset thing. When they view you as a partner, the relationship is much, much different. You don't need to share exact numbers here, but from a marketing spend standpoint, do you look at how much you're going to allocate to marketing as a percentage of revenue? How do you do that for your company?

Aida Keehner
So if my accountant would hear me answer this question, they would probably cring. So I will say just this. Even though we meet weekly, and I know exactly how much I'm spending a month, and I know how much sometimes when we have extra, we budget it accordingly. I never look at the numbers based on how much I'm going to allocate it based on a certain percentage of revenue because it's been proven already. I'm making that money back over and over again.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. So over the years, have you continued to increase that spend or has it remained fairly consistent?

Aida Keehner
It depends. It depends if we're doing extra things such as trade shows or any other things that are outside of the norm. It's almost the same on a monthly basis, but there is this fluctuation on some quarters.

A Strong Employee Success Strategy

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Okay, I love it. One of the things that you shared, I know, was that you believe in a strong employee success strategy, which automatically leads to a strong client success strategy. Can you break that down a little bit for us?

Aida Keehner
Yeah. People always ask me that question. That's funny. Have you ever heard that before?

Tim Fitzpatrick
I've heard it in I think slightly different flavors or shades, I guess. But it makes sense to me, which is one of the reasons why I asked you about it, because I think it's just interesting that when you focus on one thing, a lot of times there's just natural things that occur as a result of that. And that's what I think is happening here.

Aida Keehner
Yeah. So I'm actually going to steal something that I actually heard from another podcast. So even though my official title is CEO, which in the normal, my culture is chief executive officer, I actually like to rephrase it to chief encouragement officer. I didn't make this up. It's not mine. I can't remember who said that, but I loved it so much. I said openly that I'm totally stealing it from somebody else. When it comes to employees, employees are people. And people in general, no matter where they are, the commonality that you find is they want to be valued, they want to be understood, and they want to be accepted. If you can provide a safe environment for those very three things, even though we provide a core product, really is technology, so we're a service technology company. But what do we really provide is service, is client relationship, the technology aspect is just a tool. So if you concentrate all of your effort in the people that are actually delivering that service and they feel those three things, which is valued, understood, and accepted, automatically, what's going to happen on the back end when they interact with the client? So if you concentrate on them first, the rest automatically follows. I'm not telling you that I don't have a client success strategy. I do. But it always starts with the people that are delivering the service first.

Tim Fitzpatrick
If they're not happy, it's hard for them to do a good job, right?

Aida Keehner
Right. That's the explanation. Behind it. That make sense?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, it makes perfect sense. I really like that. Chief encouragement officer. I'm going to steal that one, too.

Aida Keehner
I have to find which podcast I heard that from. I don't believe I'm doing him. Whoever said that I'm doing him a disservice. I feel like I should name him, but I don't remember his name, but I'm stealing it shamelessly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's okay. That's totally okay. And I love the fact that you're focusing on with employees, people want to feel valued, understood, and accepted. And that's the framework that you are focused on to create this employee success strategy, which I really like because it's simple. We're not focusing on a gazillion different things. There's three different things we need to focus on to have a successful employee strategy.

Aida Keehner
I'll tell you another side story.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, please do.

Aida Keehner
We're talking about branding. We're talking about marketing. We're talking about how they all tied together, which is one of the things that absolutely fascinates me. I do town hall meetings on a monthly basis with all of my staff. I share essentially everything that's going on in the business, including financials, because I believe in transparency. You remember, I talked about the word trust before. And what's happening in our world, who's coming in, how many people are we going to hire, what's going to happen in Q3 Q4, etc. And I always leave 30 minutes toward the end for an open forum where people can leave suggestions and feedback or anything else they want to talk about. And one of the things that I absolutely love that happened not too long ago is every company has a probation period for an employee that comes in. So you have 90 days, the induction aspect of it. They're going to learn your way, you're going to learn how they function. They have to be trained on the gazillion software that we use, gazillion different environment that we maintain. And after the 90 days, then a lot of things kick in. So in during that town hall meeting, one of the staff says to me, I said, We, apparently they talked about this before, we don't want to call it probation anymore. I said, Okay, what do you want to call it? And you said, Well, I said, Well, what's wrong with probation? And they said, Probation sounds very negative, almost sounds like jailish. So we want to call it ATRUductory. ATRU - atruductory. At true doctrine period instead of probation period. So they put the branding in the word. I feel like I. Should hashtag this.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, you should. It's a good one.

Aida Keehner
At true doctrine period. We even change our internal document to HR, so we don't call it probation period anymore. It's been adopted. It's official documents where when an employee comes on board, they have to have an official document that clients, what's going to happen during the atruductory period.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Classic example of being open minded and listening to what other people have to say because sometimes...

Aida Keehner
That was absolutely brilliant. Then I had a client... Not even a client, not even a client, actually somebody I met in a networking event created a new hashtag and called it atrufans.

Tim Fitzpatrick
hereT you go.

Aida Keehner
So that's the power of marketing right there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Well, you know what? It's a classic example of... This happens in marketing all the time, but I think it's appropriate to all the various aspects of our businesses is that we're too close to the fire. We can't think very clearly sometimes about our business, and we need those outside eyes, and we need to be open to hearing those outside eyes. Because oftentimes people bring things up like, Hey, it should be our atruductory period. Oh, my God. That's brilliant. It makes perfect sense. Why didn't I think of that?

Aida Keehner
I was actually mad. I'm like, How could you not say that? I didn't think of that.

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Marketing Challenge: Creating a Business Development and Sales Process

Tim Fitzpatrick
How could you not say it? It happens all the time. It's a fantastic example. I know one of the other things that we had touched on, the marketing side of things seems to really be working very well for you. You know you put money in, you're going to get far more than that out. Business development hasn't been quite as seamless. Why do you think that's been challenging?

Aida Keehner
I think I'm the bottleneck, to be honest. I think that because I think I'm good at what I do, because the advantage that I have is my secret sauce is I'm really good at creating those relationships. And because I'm really good at creating those relationships, especially when I meet new people, I can also talk the technical language because that's my trade. So having these two components in one person, it's really, really difficult to find. And I have not been able to find that person. And I think I need to get out of my head and finally realize, okay, let's be frank, most business owner out there probably feel the same way I do in their respective trade, that there is nobody that can sell the way you can sell your own company. It's the truth. Everybody knows it because it's your baby, you know the intric of it, you know how to market yourself and you started this. The trade to that is I have to shift my mindset to... And I'm glad you talk about you didn't say sales, you said business development because there's such a huge difference that people sometimes don't realize. I do business development, I don't do sales. Sales is a transaction. Business development is a relationship building aspect of the business, which is what I do. My challenge is going to be to put or essentially try to find somebody that can do the handshake. Start the building relationship aspect and bring me into the first or second or third meeting so that I can actually solidify that relationship and talk the technical. Aspect of things because I've been doing for the past four years all of it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So you're really looking to hire somebody who can do the initial relationship building and then handle the passing of the baton to you to finish the remainder of the sales process?

Aida Keehner
Correct.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Aida Keehner
Well, I'm still going to do that things. I love speaking engagement. I love being on panel. I love doing podcast. But I, unfortunately, can't do many of those because there was only one me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right. Yeah. There's only one you and you only have so much time. So it sounds like right now you're handling business development and you're handling the sales for all your new clients.

Aida Keehner
Yeah. I'm not even going to go down that list. We don't have enough time.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Sales can be when you've been doing it as the business owner, when you've been doing the business development and the sales side of it, it can be a really difficult thing to initially transfer over. And I think it depends on how you have it set up. But I think the more refined and documented your process is, the easier it is to start to hand that off to somebody else. I think where people struggle in that they hire people and they bring them on and it doesn't work, I think a lot of that stems from just lack of a process. And I actually, I have an interview coming up. I have another RAS interview coming up in a couple of weeks, I think, with the gentleman where we're going to break that down. Their sales enablement and sales process is totally dialed in. Now, that doesn't mean that there's no flexibility because you have to have some level of flexibility. But I think it's important to outline, hey, these are the steps, the defined steps that people go through when they express interest in working with us. Because if you don't have those express steps, you don't have a process. And it's hard to plug people in and say, Hey, you need to go sell or you need to go market, or, You need to go implement this project, this IT project. If you don't have steps that people follow and you're just winging it every time, it makes things very, very difficult.

Aida Keehner
Right. And I'm going to play the devil advocate here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Please do.

Aida Keehner
Well, I totally I am behind. Now, remember, we're technology company, so we all have process. When it comes to the help desk, to the project, to the installation, to procurement, to hardware, all of that has a process. Escalation, SLA, everything has a process. When it comes to business development, I don't even know where to begin on how to document the business development process because when I go to an event, a networking event, and I meet people and I start never talk about my business. I talk about my dogs, I talk about my travel, I talk about my favorite wine, I'm asking them questions, what do you like to do on your time? I build the relationship. And if it clicks, the rest will come eventually afterwards if the need is there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
How do you document that?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Because there's not set steps. It's not like, Hey, go through these 10 steps. But what I think you can do is document the methodology and the thought process behind how you do it. One of the things you said is I don't really focus on business that much. I focus on just getting to know these people. That's a really important part of what you do. And I think one of the reasons why you're really successful at it is because you don't have... What you're doing is you're building genuine connections with people, which I did a podcast episode about a month ago about genuine connection. And honestly, this is something that I have not been great at. I am so focused on the business side of it. There are oftentimes where I overlook the personal side of it, and the personal side of it is what really drives the relationship forward. And when I did that interview with was with April Brumm that I did it with. It really opened my eyes and I was like, man, I need to shift my thought process here. And so somebody coming into a business development role could easily say, Well, this is how I build relationships. And that may not really be the best way to do it. And so sharing the thought process, breaking it down, showing how you stay in touch with people, because there's multiple ways to stay in touch with people, too. And so your thought process there behind, well, this is what I typically do. As the relationship unfolds, do you rate these people A, B, and C? Do you put them into groups? Based on groups, do you interact with them in different ways? Again, I don't know. I'm asking more rhetorical questions here, but I think you can put down your methodology, your thought process, and guidelines that somebody can follow coming into a position like that that is going to help them be successful and to give them the tools to stay in touch with people. Because the other thing you touched on that is super important is when they have the need, they're going to reach out. They reach out to you when they have the need because you are top of mind and you are top of mind because of a process that you go through to build that relationship.

Aida Keehner
Right. But my process is not necessarily the process of another person. I talked to a business owner, I think it was a couple of years ago, who was also running an IT service company. And I asked him, I said, Well, even though I don't like to call it process, because even though it is a process, I said, What's your methodology in getting your client? And he's a guy. So he said, Oh, I go to the local bar and I just talk to people over a beer and then you know they're my client. And I'm like, Well, I won't do that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right. It's different. But there's still in between those going to the bar, he's just talking to people, he's meeting them, right? The way I think about it, with a system, it's like you don't really deviate from the system. With guidelines, with the methodology, there's latitude for people to inject their own personality into that, but they have an idea of how they should be approaching it. Because if they approach it from... If they have the wrong approach, they're going to struggle and they're not going to be successful. You have an approach that you know works. It sounds like it's pretty important to you that whoever comes into this role values that same approach.

Aida Keehner
Well, with the caveat that I have an approach that I know works with my personality.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. But I think that's how I... To me, it's a matter of, I think, documenting your thought process behind it, your methodology, your approach, and figuring out how you can provide that information so that somebody can make it their own while still following the general guidelines of it. It's like a script. People talk about sales scripts all the time and it's like, Well, you can give somebody a sales script, but they can't follow it to the T. It's not going to be natural. They need to make that their own. And so the way I see it, by documenting your thoughts on this, you're giving somebody the overall general plan and then giving them the latitude to tweak and make that their own without completely breaking the whole house down and them just rebuilding it.

Aida Keehner
Right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I think that's the important part of the process. And the other thing, too, and you've done this on the marketing side, you found a good partner and look, you've been consistent. Everything you do from a marketing standpoint doesn't work. Did you give up when one of the things they did didn't work? No. You adjusted the approach, you pivoted, and you just keep moving forward and you learn from that. I think from a business development standpoint, especially, it's the same thing because you know, I'm in business development, this is a long cycle here. You don't build a relationship in a month.

Aida Keehner
No.

Tim Fitzpatrick
This is something that you and me, any other business owner who's looking at doing this, needs to go into it from a long term mindset and be like, I'm going to invest in this and I am going to be the chief encouragement officer for this person. I am going to encourage them as they hit roadblocks and I am going to help guide them as they run into those roadblocks so that they can help push through them. But I'm going to be patient.

Aida Keehner
Yeah. So patience is something that I actually had to learn. And this is one of the reason why I absolutely love my current marketing partner is if there is something that this country has taught me, and I've been here for 23 years now, is you get used to instant gratification. This is what America is all about. Amazon, Uber, you name it, you get delivery, Instacart out of your door. You don't even have to go to the grocery store anymore. Instant gratification. When we started many years ago into our SEO efforts, a month after, I'm like, Why is nothing happening? What's happening?

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's going on?

Aida Keehner
I'm not seeing anything. And he was actually really good and showing me the intricacy of how it works on the back end and how the Google machine also works and how it's not... There is absolutely zero instant gratification when it comes to that type of things. It takes time.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Honestly, I think, Aida, that's one of the biggest issues that people have when they invest in marketing is the instant gratification, short term mindset. I did this for a month and it's not working and they give up and they go shift to something else. And you know what? Honestly, that's part of marketing's fault, too, because there's all kinds of people that promise, Hey, we'll get you on the page one of Google in 30 days. They're over promising and underdelivering. They're promising something that they don't completely control. And I think more people from a marketing standpoint need to just be upfront. And it's like, look, marketing takes time. It is an investment, and you need to think long term. If you're a short term thinker, you are never going to like marketing and you are never going to be happy with the results.

Aida Keehner
Absolutely.

Conclusion

Tim Fitzpatrick
What are your aspirations for the future? What do things look like for Atruent?

Aida Keehner
I'd like to keep it simple. I want to continue growing. I want to continue to thrive to be the best that we are, continue building those relationships. Who knows what we're going to be in two, five years from now. Maybe you'll invite me again in five years from now and you'll see, Oh, my God, look where you were before and look where you are today. It's just never know. But we're just going to keep on going.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. Keep pushing. So knowing what you know now, is there anything you do differently?

Aida Keehner
Are we talking about my personal life or what are you talking about?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Whatever you want to share.

Aida Keehner
Okay. So knowing what I know now probably would have never got married, which my business probably in a different place sooner than three years ago. But joking aside, I don't think I would honestly change anything. Everything that I went through in growing this business was meant to happen the way it did, to teach me the lessons that I needed to learn to continue thriving forward.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Aida, this has been a great conversation. I really appreciate you being so open and sharing all this info. There's a ton of great stuff people can take away from what we chatted about today. Where can people learn more about you?

Aida Keehner
Atruent.com. All of our social media handler are in the website. We do put a lot of content out there. Actually, shout out to my marketing company who puts a lot of great content out there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, cool. Hey, by the way, we never talked about this. What's the name of your marketing company? We should be giving them some kudos here.

Aida Keehner
CC&A. Actually, I want to give you two shout outs. The person, the company that designed the logo and the branding for it was Mojo.Biz. And the company that I'm working with and been working with, will continue to work with is CCNA Marketing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. And that's CC and then N like Nancy A?

Aida Keehner
Cc & sign A.

Tim Fitzpatrick
CC&A. Okay, cool. I love it. Yeah, they should get some kudos here. So if you liked what Aida had to share, go to the Atruent website. It's atruent.com. We'll make sure that's in the show notes. Aida, thank you so much for taking the time. It's been a pleasure connecting with you. And as you can tell, I was taking some fee version notes as we were talking about all this stuff.

Aida Keehner
I know the only note you took was chief encouragement officer. I know it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Chief Encouragement officer, that's right. It's a big letter. I love it. So thank you again, Aida. Those that are watching, listening, thank you for doing so. We have been talking all about growth, accelerating revenue. If you want to discover which of the nine revenue roadblocks are slowing down your growth, you can do that over revenueroadblockscorecard.com. You can also always connect with us over at rialtomarketing.com, which is RIALTOmarketing.com. Thank you so much. Till next time. Take care. Thank you, Tim.

Aida Keehner
I appreciate you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Thank you, Aida.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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