The Productivity X Factor You Need to Know About

February

11

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As entrepreneurs, many of us want to do less, while achieving more. One of the critical elements in accomplishing this has to do with your ability to focus and be productive with the things that truly matter. We’re going to dig into this with Brad A. Milford from Build Brilliance - Business Solutions today.

Join Brad A. Milford and Tim Fitzpatrick for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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The Productivity X Factor You Need to Know About



Tim Fitzpatrick
As entrepreneurs, many of us want to do less while achieving more. But one of the critical elements in accomplishing this has to do with our ability to focus and be productive on the things that really matter. I'm going to dig into this topic with our special guest today. I'm super excited, so please stay tuned and we're going to jump right in. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. I am super excited to have with me, Brad A Milford from Build Brilliance Business Solutions. Brad, thanks for being here, man. I appreciate it.

Brad A Milford
My pleasure, man. Glad to be here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. So we're switching sides of the mic. I was on your podcast, I don't know, a month or so ago. So I appreciate you doing me a solid and jumping on to chat today. Before we get into what we're really going to talk about, I want to ask you some rapid-fire questions, help us get to know you a little bit. Yeah, exactly. You ready to rock and roll?

Brad A Milford
I'm ready to rock and roll, man.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, so when you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Brad A Milford
I'm a bit of an explorer. I like to explore places I've never been. You ever been one of those small towns in, like, Spain or Italy or somewhere rarely seen an American? That's where you usually find me or you'll find me on a beach somewhere in the world.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's your hidden talent.

Brad A Milford
Tim. This is a tough one for me. It's tied to discernment. So let me share a story quick. When I made a change about 15 years or so ago, I had reached my leadership led. And when I went through, like, a six month leadership collaborative similar to a mastermind, and we're coming to the end. And I still didn't feel like I really knew my talents well enough. Right. I'd done strength finders and all these things. So we went around the room of these twelve people, and each person, it was a great exercise, I highly recommend this for teams, each person gave two things they liked about you. One thing you could probably improve, right? That's a good proportion. And so as we went around the room, I was like, people are going around. And when it came to me, I just zipped through the whole room and I was like, you do this and you do that and you do this and this you're great at this. And you're right. And everybody just looked at me like, how did you do that? And I was confused by that. I'm like, what do you mean? We all can see this. It's so obvious. And I was just, like, jumping into it because it's such a talent of mine. And I thought that everybody could see the same thing that I could see. Well, it turns out that discernment or finding talents, finding strength, it's actually called individualization. It's a strength on the strength finders that's a strength of mine, and I thought everybody had it. Turned out that not everybody has that. So to summarize that my greatest talent is actually helping people, other people find their greatest strengths and talents as a coaching consultant, it's a valuable skill, but learning that only came from working with other leaders and getting feedback.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's interesting you touch on this, because I think it's so easy for us to skip over this. But our greatest strengths often are those things that we don't even think about because we're so good at them. It just happens naturally. If you're having a hard time figuring out what your strengths are, try and hone in on those things that you're good at that you just don't even think about.

Brad A Milford
It comes from others. It's a really difficult, challenging thing to figure out by yourself.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, it is. What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Brad A Milford
People only know what they know. This may sound really simple, but it's profound. Think of a time when you were baffled or even surprised by someone's actions. Right. So people only know what they know. Inherently, people are good, but sometimes the gap between intentions and actions causes frustration. Right. To release that frustration or attachment to why a person may have done a certain thing or behaves a certain way, just remember that people only do what they know. Right. I'd say have patience and be kind.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Brad A Milford
That surprises people about me or about them?

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Brad A Milford
I thought that's what you meant. Thanks for clarifying. I studied wine for over ten years, deeply, like geographically, the real research. Right. So I'm quite a wine expert, but surprisingly, studying the science of it all has shown me a lot of lessons in business. You want one?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Absolutely. Well, you can't throw that out there.

Brad A Milford
I thought you might say. It's kind of fun. There's so many examples. I have some behind me and props and different things I use. But if we think of a boutique wine, like a really more expensive wine, would people say, but something better than the average. It all comes down to yield. And I think this is a great business exercise. Right. So if you think hand picked, like all the grapes are hand picked and they throw away, they get rid of or reuse the ones that aren't perfect. Right. To give the juice more juice to the best ones. So there's a low yield and high value in the actual grapes from boutique wines. And that's the reason why they're as expensive they are. They're less commercialized and less of a commodity. And I think that's a really interesting quick lesson for business as well. As a marketer, Tim, you know all about this, so I love using analogies like that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's a great example of how we can apply things in different disciplines to other disciplines. It's so easy for us to overlook those things. But, man, there's all kinds of ways we can learn each and every day. So I love that. What does success mean to you?

Brad A Milford
Success is a state of mind. You can be as successful as you desire. Honestly, you can. But joyful. Notice I say joyful, joyful and sustainable success comes from expansion. And despite what many people think or a lot of people think, real success comes from enjoying the small habits and actions. Small habits and actions daily. Those are the ones that are repeated daily. They're the big disciplines. And those are the winds of shifting, like when you fail and falling forward and all that, and then leveraging those to scale up and expand your impact and influence. That's where it's at right there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Brad A Milford
Everywhere you go, there you are my happy place, Tim, is wherever I am with who wherever I am. Actively participating and actively listening in the present moment, like I am with you and all of you listening right now.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What qualities do you value and the people you spend time with?

Brad A Milford
I love this question. So I'm a big principles guy. Values guys. So conscientiousness. That's my number one. It's not a very common word today. So what I mean by that is following through to the fullest extent. I look for people who do that. Optimization, fine-tuning through data and tracking. Huge. I know you're big on that, too, Tim. This is one of the reasons why I get along. Rallying relationships with depth. I'm more of a deep, intense guy. Right. Rather than just superficial stuff and effectiveness over effort, those are really important to me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So before we jump into productivity, time management, talking about all that fun stuff, tell us a little bit more about what you're doing at Build Brilliance. Who are you working with? How you helping people?

Brad A Milford
Yeah, I love that. Instead of going through like some rambling mission statement or something, I just say these three words and I recommend. So I like to model what I teach as well. I'd recommend these three words. So these next three words are really important. Ever feel like that's a great way to just start a conversation if you're out networking with people. So ever feel like there's more out there for you? Or maybe you're just not sure of specific actions to take to achieve more? I'm a builder. I'm a builder of people and things. I love to coach coaches, executives, entertainers, athletes, speakers, trainers, owners, people who are agents of change. I love working with them. And ultimately as a foundation guy, as a pattern guy, I help people build unbreakable systems now so they don't stagnate and struggle later. Let me put it this way, though, Tim. After working with me, you can build your business as many floors as you like and scale your business as high as you like, and that's not all. You can also run as fast and as far as you've ever wanted with the freedom that you've desired.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it, man. Let's jump into it. I know you're very outspoken about time management. Tell me more.

Brad A Milford
Yes, I am. Time management sucks. No, I say that jokingly. There's a lot of misinformation out there. Time management is a philosophy. It's one way of thinking of things, but even the slight shift in terminology. So I'm a big linguistic guy, right? The words we use, the labels that we give things are really important and they point us toward a trajectory. And so just saying time management, we don't manage time. Time is just a thing. In fact, it's actually a creative thing. There are many types of time. I won't go too deep there. We don't have time for that. But what's interesting is priority management is much more powerful. Yet priority management has talked about less than time management. So when I used to track my time, I often felt like just bogged down or that my To-do list just kept rolling over, rolling over, rolling over. It took me years of playing with this, to be quite honest, but it's actually a really simple thing if you have the steps. But the difference. The key to breaking through the rut of the day-to-day hamster wheel of time management is looking at it as priority management. It all comes down to the priorities. What we do is who we are. What most people do, Tim, is they prioritize and they use tools like the Eisenhower matrix. Important, not important, important and urgent. I'm like Elite. You can Google that if you don't know what it is, it's everywhere, right? But that's one way and that's a good way. That's better. If you're not using any kind of tool like the Eisenhower matrix, it's a great way, but that's 2D. So I like to look at even some of the better people use 3D. So let me give an example. I usually show slides, but we can still talk through this. Bear with me audience and you'll see clearer. 3D is using that kind of prioritizing, right? Urgent, urgent important, not important, not urgent that kind of thing. But adding an element, right? So on the bear with me. I promise this will become easier. On the y axis is importance, right? So most of us look at the importance of a task and on the X axis they look at efficiency. So is this efficient? And that's better than the 2D in and of itself. But there's also like, let's evolve, let's grow, right? Let's also add in, let's look at it as in 4D. So four-dimensional prioritizing is more like adding in the significance of the activities that we're actually working on overtime and then measuring the value of those and tracking those not only just on some chart, but really, truly looking at daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, literally tracking. Is this effective? Is it efficient? Is it moving the needle forward? Is it not moving the forward? So here in this short connection time together, I'd say look at specifically not only periodically, like daily, monthly, quarterly. And I know you're a huge proponent of this, Tim. I'd say evaluate. Right. Let's look at five areas for today's call. Evaluate, eliminate, automate, delegate, collaborate. These are powerful areas, right. So let me give you some examples. For evaluation, what needs to be done to move the needle for today, right? That's the hamster wheel. Today, tomorrow, better days in the future and to achieve your legacy. When was the last time you paused and actually evaluated or thought about all of those areas? In the category of eliminate, what can be removed right now or placed in a parking lot until it's most important? So many entrepreneurs, business owners, people that I connect with are just really swirling and overwhelmed and shiny objects, and it's really kind of an epidemic. In the next category, automate. I know, again, you're a big proponent of this, Tim. I say, what programs, apps or tools can you use to simplify? Simple as brilliant, right? Simplify, remove steps to automate things rather than struggling through those daily. Delegate. What assistance is available to you to be more effective? What don't I really need to touch? That's a real powerful question. I'm going to be honest and very authentic with you right now. It's one I struggle with all the time. Right. So as I go through my tasks, my daily habits, and things, I ask myself regularly, how many things am I touching that I really can delegate that I could give to my assistant or to someone else, to a volunteer? It's a powerful question. Are you asking yourself that question every single day to pull yourself from the hamster wheel? Right. And then the last category, collaborate. Who's in my network? In your network, right at your fingertips. Right here. Who's in my network that has a strength in this particular challenge or area of improvement? So many entrepreneurs, business owners, are just afraid to ask for help when there are so many people who would actually be willing to help them. So I'd say evaluate, eliminate, automate, delegate, and collaborate with the people around you. I'll pause there for your input.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You drop some serious value there. I want to pull out a couple of things that I think are really important here. I love the distinction between time management and priority management. Sometimes it is just a simple shift in words that has so much meaning to it. And we all have the same amount of time. Where I think a lot of business owners go down the wrong path is we prioritize the wrong things, we're prioritizing the urgent, the fires that are coming up, and those things are getting in the way. I touched on this in the intro of the things that really matter, the things that are going to help us get to where we want to go, we have to prioritize those things. We have to have a list of what our priorities are. Right. Because if we don't know what our priorities are, we don't have clarity and we're like squirrels chasing a nut. So when the urgent comes up, we just go down that path and that's not going to get us where we want to go long term. The other thing that you said that I think is super important, I love the five elements that you shared and somebody shared this with me a while back. One of the easiest ways to start to simplify things is to eliminate like we are prioritizing things that we don't even need to do. So if we can start there by eliminating the things that just are not getting us where we need to go, gosh, that clears so much stuff off our plate and it's a really easy place to start. So you dropped a ton of value there. I want to go into talking about productivity. You talk about this X factor. What have you found is that X factor when it comes to productivity.

Brad A Milford
These two words that I use again, labels matter. Things we tell ourselves matter. Mindset matters. Words matter. Right. So I call it proportional priorities. And it really does come down to matching that with tracked habits. So I've been working with habits for over 20 years now. I didn't start out this way. It's definitely been a learned skill. Right. But using proportional prior. So what do I mean by that? Measuring the leading. Let's talk business for a minute. The leading and lagging indicators. So, Tim, I know you're very familiar with those, but for anybody listening, that might not be familiar, let's make that really simple and understandable for this call. Right. Leading indicator. Well, let me start with lagging indicators. So lagging indicators are simple examples, like, let's just say you want to lose weight, right. So I want to lose 20 pounds. Okay, great. That's past ten. So if you lose 20 pounds, that's a lagging indicator. What are the activities that would lead to actually achieving that goal? And so now you have the leading indicators and a lot of people get caught up. But let's say I want to make 20K a month more. Right. That's another lagging indicator. And a lot of people get caught up in that and they track those with their KPIs and all that kind of stuff, but they're not tracking leading indicators, which are the actual things that are going to move the needle forward for you. And so what the X factor really is it's tracking. Notice I said tracking, it's really in the tracking, like when you focus on something, the RAS. Right. Reticular Activating System is a great example of that. If anybody knows what that is as part of the brain that helps us focus on the main thing. Right? Let's keep the main thing the main thing. And so when you track something, you highlight it and you focus on it and you're able to observe that. I won't get too much into physics, but it's true. It's really important. So we want to track the leading indicators. Yes, you're shooting for the lagging indicators, but you want to track the leading indicators more often. It's daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly. And a lot of us aren't trained in that, right. It might not be a strength or we just don't have the training or we never had exposure to that. But it's so powerful when you do, then you can actually look at a chart or you can look at a diagram, you can see the gaps, literally. I recognized a gap last week in my own personal sales. I recognized that through my tracking and was able to say, Whoa, Brad, what are you doing? And then correct that this week it was very easy to do when you have that structure and substructure in place. So that's the X factor. I'll throw a couple more questions because I think questions are powerful. And then I'll come back to you, Tim, what percentage of my activities are in specific categories? And are they harmonized? So here's another label thing, right? A lot of people talk about balance. Hey, look, I'm pretty good on the balance board for about 30 seconds, but I fall off, right, because balance is not sustainable. But I love the word harmony because you can be harmonized in a variety of activities on it for a sustained amount of time. Right. So even that word is important. So what percentage of my activities are in specific categories and are they harmonized? Learning, teaching, marketing, promotion, sales. These are the lifeblood of most companies. So what percentage of time? Each day, each week, each month and each quarter. And are you observing those for effectiveness like I talked about before? So another question here. Are they part of my nonnegotiable, notice of terminology there, daily habits. If they're not, if they're sporadic, they're random, then how do you expect to actually make progress? Or how would you even know if you're making progress? Are they structured? Are they time-based? Are they measurable? Right. Are they being tracked again, not to be like a bulldog, but daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, annually. Taking a look at these things is really important. And are they being evaluated? I really am driving some important keywords play on word there. But keywords here just for effectiveness, like, are they being evaluated for effectiveness on a regular basis? So many of us take stepping stones, but we don't pause to look around and say, did that action actually take me where I want to go before taking the next stepping stone? It's like hopping from stepping stone to stepping stone. And then ten years from now, they go, oh, my ladder is not leaning on the right wall. Well, shame on you for not pausing to evaluate. I have to throw this out there again, I know you'll appreciate them, but not by some don't evaluate by some ethereal notion out there somewhere. I feel like I'm on track, but based on actual data.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So I want to make sure I got this right. The productivity X factor is about your priorities and tracking the habits that are going to support those priorities. Is that right?

Brad A Milford
That's correct. Okay, let me illustrate this a little bit. So I have a habit tracker, so I like to simplify, you know, this. I say simple as bright. I say it all the time. So I think when things are sip. So it's one thing to just talk about habits. That's a broad subject, right. So I want to give a little bit specifics and a little bit more actionable information, something you can implement today. Because I think that's when things are powerful. Right. So in playing with this over the years, look, I said it's a skill, right? It was choppy at first. And when I looked at my tracking methods, they were all over the board. And I'm like, well, how do I streamline this? How do I fix it? So there's really only three areas that we work in that we live in. It's less simplified, right? It's before work, at work and after work. It doesn't matter whether you're a stay at home dad or if you're a Fortune 100 female CEO. It doesn't make no difference, right? It's before work, at work and after work. And when you break your habits down into that. So what do I need to be doing in the morning to move the needle forward for myself? Is it maybe you pray or maybe you meditate or maybe you run or whatever it is, break those things down into my before work and make them a habit and then make them easy and simple and convenient. So I have a tracker for this, and I literally link all the things that need to be linked into the tracker. So when I go to my tracker runs my day. So I go to the tracker and I just click the link over into those categories. And then I do whatever I do whatever it is for you, right. And so I'm tracking them every day. Monday done, Tuesday done. And I measure those. Did I complete them daily? Did I complete them overall? And then I look at the trends. Look, I need to pause here for a moment. None of us is perfect, right? So shoot for perfection, you're going to disappoint yourself. But what's cool is we can shoot for what I've found to be very effective is 80%. So if we shoot for 80% of the time, that gives us a little leeway, right? I also say structure creates freedom. So you have the structure, but you also have the freedom. So I can manufacture my time. I say that all the time. I joke around about like, hey, let's hop on a call. Now I can manufacture time for you because I know exactly where I am in my habits. Maybe I need to work just a little bit extra that day to still track my habits. Maybe somebody passed away. People first. Right. And I need to share some time with people because of that. Right. Things like that happen. So I know exactly what I need to give up either for that day or for that hour. So I had the freedom and flexibility by actually having structure. But it's in those categories. Simplify it, make it easy before work, at work, after work. Does that make sense to you, Tim?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, absolutely. And I love I obviously agree with you on simplicity. Right. Complexity is the enemy of results. With what you're tracking with your habits. It sounds like I want to try and tie this back to another really important point that you touched on. It sounds like you're tracking the leading indicators, those actions that are going to help you build those habits. Right?

Brad A Milford
Nailed it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And I loved when you talked about leading indicators. I have a leading indicators tracker. Okay. On that leading indicators tracker are leads, discovery calls, or free consults. That's what it is for me. Proposals and then new clients. So I track at each step. Those are my leading indicators. If you track the right leading indicators, it's a leading indicator. It's leading a result that you want to achieve. If you track the right leading indicators, it will give you a very strong idea of where your business is going. And that is so many people don't do this. As you touched on, we're tracking lagging indicators that aren't going to tell us anything. Right. We've already got there. Leading indicators are so important. I did not come up with this. I got the leading indicators idea from a leader, a group that I was involved in called Three to Five. And dude, you are right on. It is so cool. Those leading indicators are going to be different for different people. We just need to identify those and track those. Again, I keep this simple. It is on a Google sheet. That's it. And there's the columns there's by week. And I just track it by week. But I, at any given point, can tell you how many leads I need to get a new client where things drop, like how many people that become leads, choose to book a discovery call, choose to get a proposal that then become a client. Simple numbers to track. Super powerful once you have the data.

Brad A Milford
100%. I want to be really humble here. Again, for a lot of us, I don't want to say all because I'm not sure that's true. But for a lot of us, this is a learned skill. Right. So there's no harm if you just haven't been exposed to this or if you've never even thought about it before, that's okay, I'm with you, man. So I would say, look, to someone I'm not really like hard pitching, like coaching and consulting. But if you find a good one, let's not go there, Tim. Those other ones. But find somebody that's really experienced. There are so many entrepreneurs and business owners that are visionaries. And I love that. Right. I absolutely love that. I happen to be an integrator. Right. So this stuff is a little bit more naturally I'm a little more naturally inclined to this project management experience, that kind of thing. But if you've never been exposed to it, then how on Earth would you know? You got to connect with somebody that can expose you to this kind of stuff and make it simple and convenient. That's really key. If we set these habits. Look, a lot of people this happens to be recorded at the beginning of the year. Now or even in the future, depending on the year that somebody listens or watches, every year, people talk about resolutions and stuff, and they make things so complicated that they just never achieve any of it. We got to make it really simple and really convenient. And then look, 21 days, we could talk about the validity of this, but it's close. 21 days to create a habit, 90 days to create a lifestyle. And it's just discipline from there. Get it done.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You touched a little bit. You have a lot of experience. You touched on this. Looking back on your years of wins losses, what's a major mistake you made and how would you do it differently knowing what you know now?

Brad A Milford
Yeah. So again, being humble. I'm a mistake expert.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, me too.

Brad A Milford
I think a lot of entrepreneurs are. So if you're laughing right now, you get it. You know. I used to be afraid of that. I didn't want to tell people that, but I'm actually proud of it. My mistakes are my biggest takeaways, my biggest learnings. But going back to the question, I would say, number one, I'm going to give two. I like to overdeliver. I'll make them fast. The power of community. The power of community is humongous. Yet like mastermind groups, affinity groups, support groups, accountability. It's huge, right? Story polling, focus groups. There's so much information that you can get from a group that you just can't get by yourself. It's so powerful. And then, like I said, information things as skills and strengths and talents that you don't have. Right. So strength based leadership as well. But there's too many I got to call it what it is, Tim. There's too many entrepreneurs and business owners that are overly independent and too stubborn to ask for help. So mastermind groups for me, I mean, I was grown. I was raised by Wolves. No, I'm just kidding. I was raised to be super independent. Right. And I had to learn interdependence. It's been a lifelong of learning for me. So I would encourage you to be more interdependent and collaborate with some other people and be less independent and stubborn and not ask for help. That's one and two is super short, Tim. It's focus on one product first. So I mentioned the kind of people that I like to work with and collaborate and be surrounded by. I made a mistake, too. Like, I've wanted to do, like, four or five different products, six products at the same time. And then I had to rip up the foundation and redo everything. And I've literally had to do that in physical time, like rip out concrete. It's not fun. And so to create the foundation first, I'd say focus on one product and follow through that product to the fullest extent. Make sure you have your funnel right. You've got the steps and they're easy and it's tested and all that kind of stuff. And focus on one first and nail it down. It doesn't need to be perfect progress over perfection, but get it done, get it functional, get it working first before you go, try to launch other products because people underestimate the amount of time that takes to launch a product.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, totally agree. Those are two really key pieces of advice. And I particularly fall into the first one, not asking for help. I think a lot of entrepreneurs are naturally that way. Right. You're forging your path. And I actually had a conversation with a couple of people on our team this week about asking for help because one of them brought it up and said, gosh, I feel like when I'm asking for help, it shows weakness. And I have fallen into that trap. And I said, look, I get it. I understand. But it's really the exact opposite. You're showing strength, you're showing confidence, vulnerability by just saying, you know what? I don't have the answer, but I know you might. Can you help me? You touched on this a little bit, too. The systems, the frameworks that we need to be successful, they're already out there. I mean, for most of us. Okay. Because, come on, most of us are not forging a brand new path, okay? Somebody has already gone down the path that we are going down. We need to find who those people are and use their frameworks. We do not need to reinvent the wheel. I have reinvented the wheel way too many times. Awesome advice. Is there any last-minute words of wisdom or thoughts you want to leave us with today, Brad?

Brad A Milford
I just want to make simple what you just said. You can use frameworks or you can do the hard work. I mean, really, it's up to you. I would say, like actionable information. So I'm big on these talks are great, but if you're not getting anything actionable from it, then it's just a little bit of alerting. So I would encourage people to take action. Here's what I recommend. After listening to watching this. I just want you to make this simple. Take a piece of paper out or take your keyboard and write down the top ten things that you need to know. You need to do them, but you just haven't been doing them. And we all have those. So you can connect with a coach, connect with a consultant, or you can just list these. I do recommend those too. But list these ten things down. You know what they are. Pause for a moment and do it now. List those ten things on a piece of paper. I know I need to do this. I just haven't been doing it. And then I want you to prioritize those one through ten, one being the most important thing out of those. And then I want you to get started. So I would encourage you to use the Pomodoro technique, which is simply put, if you haven't heard of it, just set a 25 minutes timer. Set your phone right for 25 minutes, and then put everything else off and get to that one thing. Just 25 minutes. You don't need to finish the task. Maybe it's a big, huge project and it'll take you days, but just take 25 minutes and start that one thing and table the other nine until you get that one started. And then you can jump into those other tasks. Everything doesn't need to be urgent. Just look at the things. Really, truly look at the priorities and what's going to move the needle forward for you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
This has been awesome, Brad. I always enjoy chatting with you. I appreciate you taking the time. If people want to learn more about you, chat and figure out how you might be able to help them, where should they be going?

Brad A Milford
Heck yeah, man. So let me be clear about this. I would say here step one. What I recommend, because we probably don't know each other is go to my website, buildbrilliance dot net, spelled just like it sounds. b-u-i-l-d-b-r-i-l-l-i-a-n-c-e dot net. I like to spell it. People are listening, right? That's step one. I'd say take a browse around. There's some free tools there. There's all kinds of ebooks, there's all kinds of stuff for free. That's usually where we start when we do this social selling thing and we get to connected. But if you want to take that step further, I'd say pop into my Facebook group. It's a great group. Ask questions, be engaged, start asking like, how do you do this? What about this? Tell me more about priorities and habits. Like things like that. That would take it to another level. Wherever you're ready to roll, there's stuff on the website to just reach out to me personally and send me a message.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's the name of your Facebook group?

Brad A Milford
It's Built for Brilliance.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, so Build Brilliance dot net or go onto Facebook and search Built for Brilliance.

Brad A Milford
You got it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. Brad, thank you so much, man. I appreciate it. For those of you that are listening watching thank you for tuning in. If you are struggling with your marketing, you're not quite sure what that next right step is to get where you want to go. Hop on over to our website at RialtoMarketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing dot com. Click on the get a free consult button. I will be happy to chat with you. You will walk away with some clarity on where you should be focusing right now what your priorities should be to get where you want to go. Till next time. Take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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