The Secret Weapon to Attract, Hire, And Retain Ridiculously Successful People

February

25

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One of the most common complaints from business owners about employees is “it’s hard to find good people.” Yet, your employees are one of your greatest assets. Without good ones, it’s difficult to accomplish anything. That’s why our special guest Rick Girard from Stride Search is going to help us crack the code on attracting, hiring, and retaining successful people.

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The Secret Weapon to Attract, Hire, And Retain Ridiculously Successful People



Tim Fitzpatrick
One of the most common complaints that I hear from business owners about employees is that it is hard to find good people, yet our employees are one of our most important assets. It is so difficult to accomplish anything without a great team around you. That is why I have a special guest with me today. He is going to help us crack the code on attracting, hiring, and retaining successful people. Hi, I'm Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. Super excited to have with me today, Rick Girard from Stride Search. Rick, welcome man. Thanks for taking the time.

Rick Girard
Thanks for having me, Tim. It's a pleasure to be here, man.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, I'm looking forward to digging into this. I'm going to learn from this conversation, but I know our listeners and anybody who takes the time to pay attention to what we're talking about today is going to learn a ton of stuff. Before we do that, I want to ask you some rapid fire questions to help us get to know you a little bit.

Rick Girard
Let's do it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Rick Girard
I'm usually with my wife and daughter or I'm snowboarding or I'm on the mats.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Now Southern California, do you go to Mammoth?

Rick Girard
Yeah, Mammoth. And we usually do a couple of Utah trips a year.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Right on. Love it. What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Rick Girard
Actually, it's probably the best quote that I've ever kind of read, which has really shifted how I operate in my life. If you failed to plan, plan to fail, which is Benjamin Franklin, I think he gave it to all of us. Right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Just so you know, I use that all the time because we really focus. Obviously, from the intro, we focus on marketing planning. You can't get anywhere without having a plan.

Rick Girard
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Rick Girard
I'm a black belt in Brazilian jiujitsu. That surprises people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. I love it. So don't get on your bad side.

Rick Girard
I'm a lover, not a fighter. I do it to keep in shape so I feel young again.

Tim Fitzpatrick
But it's there if you need it.

Rick Girard
Yeah, exactly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. What does success mean to you?

Rick Girard
Success for me is elevating those around me and helping them to achieve their goals. I've always measured myself by the success of the people that I work with.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That reminds me of the quote, how does it go? If you help others get what they want, you'll get everything you want as a result.

Rick Girard
Yeah, exactly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I know I'm butchering that quote, but where's your happy place?

Rick Girard
That's okay. I butcher quotes all the time. My happy place. I'm a longtime surfer, but surfing and being in a barrel, there's no other happy place than that. Right?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. I love it, man.

Rick Girard
We've got a few happy places, but that's one of my most, like, when I go to sleep at night and I have trouble sleeping, I start thinking I'm in a barrel.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I have never surfed, but there's, like, somewhere deep inside me. One of my favorite movies is the original Point Break with Keanu Reeves.

Rick Girard
I just watched them filming that movie, the part where they were like, yeah, the fight scene with Anthony Keitas.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay.

Rick Girard
We were down at the beach watching them filming that's. I'm going to age myself, but, yeah, crazy.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that movie, man. There's something about it. What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Rick Girard
Transparency and just positivity. It's so hard to stay positive sometimes, but I love surrounding myself with people that just have good energy and don't give a shit about really anything other than, let's do this.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. So before we jump into how we can attract, hire and retain people, tell us a little bit more, Rick, about just what you're doing at Stride Search and the types of people you're working with.

Rick Girard
Yeah, definitely. So at my company, we do two things. One, we actually help startups hire the strongest people for the organization. That's a long way to say that. So we work with smaller companies. We really identify the core values of the company, and then we find people that align with those organizations, which is no easy feat, especially in the current environment. And then secondarily, we teach companies how to fish and what I mean by that and then more importantly, how to catch fish. Right. I've found throughout the years of doing this work that really nobody knows how to interview. We all kind of think we do, and we have these kind of patterns that we developed that are really unnatural to the human across the desk from you. They're not comfortable most of the time. Right. So are you getting the true data from them? So what I noticed was this gap with some of the CEOs and entrepreneurs that I work with that they had no clue how to ask questions or how to gather data as to whether or not they should hire somebody. So we kind of figured out that problem for them and have been coaching and training them. And as a result, some of our clients have been getting like a 98% success rate on hires that are lasting over two years. And then they're saying, "Hey, I would never have been able to get this person without you."

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. You're helping people solve a significant problem because if you are in growth mode, it is hard to grow without finding people. At some point, the wheels are going to come off and things are going to start falling through the cracks, and that's going to slow your growth down. Let's jump into this. So I touched on this a little bit before. What's that secret weapon to attract higher and retain successful people?

Rick Girard
Core values. I'm going to drill it down to who are you as a company? And this is an exercise. It really doesn't take that much time. But most operators and most companies don't like they have words on a wall behind their desk to say, like collaboration and all these great things, but they don't live those values. And you being a leader of a company, your values are really what set up the success or failure of the company and how you live them. Right? Yeah. So your values aren't really what you inspire to be unless you're willing to make that change. It's really like who you are and who your leadership team is as a whole. Those are the values that trickle down to the rest of the organization. And when you hire people that don't align with those values, those are considered bad hires.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I heard you say this when I asked about what you did at Stride Search, and I had a feeling this is where this first question was going. So I didn't want to steal your thunder. When you talk about core values, what I'm hearing is you really lead with hiring people for a cultural fit first. That is the most important thing. Am I hearing that correctly?

Rick Girard
Absolutely. Because if you look at a lot of the data that's out there, the main reason at the root of why people fail as they're hired is because they don't align with your values. Skills are usually secondary. They get in, and a lot of people get into an organization, they feel like, "Oh, God, this isn't all what they sold me in the interview process." Because that's a whole another piece of the puzzle.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Rick Girard
And then they realized that, "Oh, God, I don't align with any of these people." And they might have the skills, but if they don't have the desire to be there, then they're going to underperform and fail.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And correct me if I'm wrong, but my sense is that the majority of companies hire for skill set first And they neglect culture and values.

Rick Girard
100% especially, like I said, I work with a lot of software development firms. Right. And so you have a bunch of software engineers, and they put a lot of time and effort into building out these skills-based interviews. And it's totally okay this guy is great, technically perfect. But how does he fit the culture of the company? How does he fit the environment? We don't know. Let's just hire him, though, and figure it out.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I think that's what people get impatient. Right. We need to hire somebody. We need to hire somebody. What they don't realize is a bad hire cost them far more time and money. They would have been better off just waiting to find the right person.

Rick Girard
Yeah. There's a great article that came out in 2010 by a guy named Steve Newcomb, and it's called The Colt Creation. And he's a guy who founded a company called Powerset, which eventually was bought by Microsoft and became Bing. It's really hard to do, but he talks about this concept of hiring slow and firing slower. Right. It's a really good message because what ends up happening everybody hears hire slow, fire fast. Nobody ever hires slow. It just doesn't happen. There's always that "God, we got to get this person on boarded before we lose him." Type thing. And it's always this manic process. I will tell you that when you have a process that's in place, people fall in line with what your process is as long as you communicate it to them. You can run whatever timeline you need to run. But what you don't want to do is you don't want to have this comparison mindset of this is the first candidate. Let's see what else we get before we make a decision. You have to treat each person on their own individual merit as to whether or not they should be hired. If you get somebody who's the first person who fits culturally and brings transferable skills that are going to help elevate the organization, that's fantastic. Hire them. There's no reason to see any other people. One position, one hire. You only need to see one person to make one hire, which kind of goes down to the mindset piece too. Change your mindset as far as this goes, I mean, why do you need to interview 25 people to make one hire?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes. Would you also say, honestly, if people just take away I need to hire based on core values out of this entire interview, they will be well served from the rest of this conversation. But I know we're going to dig into a lot of other helpful stuff. Would you say too, that at the beginning of the process, my opinion is most people's job posts absolutely suck.

Rick Girard
Oh, absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So as part of your process, I'm assuming you're helping them. Your job post can naturally attract the right people and weed out the people that you don't want to.

Rick Girard
I like to think of it this way. If you, as a marketing firm, wrote a job description based, like the content of a job description as a marketing document that you gave to a company, what would happen? You get fired. Right. It's like the worst. In order for you to work here, you have to have XYZ and it's got compliance stuff that's built into it. And it's like the most boring marketing document in the world. And people just copy and paste other people's bad stuff and put it out there. They're too lazy to write an advertisement. It's a marketing document. If you want somebody good to apply, then put some effort into it and it should be about that person that you're targeting. So know the target of the individual that you're trying to reach. Ideally, if you're going to post a job out on a job board, your target is the person who goes home one day and he's just had it with his boss, or he feels like he can't grow and he hops on indeed, or some other job board and says, "I'll just see what's out there. And I'll just browse for a little bit." That's your target of the person you want to apply, not the person who's just spamming out resumes looking for a job because they got fired from their last three jobs. Not that that's a bad thing, but obviously there's been a pattern of bad choices made. Right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's funny. We're seeing similarities with marketing and hiring. You need to understand your ideal. For me, it's ideal clients. For you, it's your ideal team member or employee, whatever you want to call them, you need to understand them and your job post needs to speak to them. And when you start to talk about your core values, if your core values don't align with those people, you're starting to weed people out.

Rick Girard
Oh, yeah, right. There's this idea of like, well, we want to make sure that we're selecting the best people. Right. But I think what really ends up happening and there's really no data on this because there's no way to track it. But when you get rid of the bottom 10%, you're also getting rid of the top 10%. And so you're left with that 80% of people in the middle. And so I don't think that you're serving yourself right by having screening mechanisms, especially like a job description. Again, it should be used to engage that right person. It should be used to engage to speak to that person in a way where it's uncovering their career wound and it's putting them in a place where they're picturing themselves being healed by your role.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, got it. So you have a book, and in your book you talk about the hiring operating system.

Rick Girard
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Can you break this down a little bit for us? What is the hiring operating system all about?

Rick Girard
Yeah, absolutely. So again, the story goes back to I've worked with so many entrepreneurs over the years and just back when I had hair and I probably would still have hair today, these were problems that kind of they sat in my gut a lot because I would find really good people and get them into the interview process. And so many things would go wrong or like, they would go right, but for the wrong reasons. For example, I actually had one person who I had an interview set up with the CEO. This was an executive role. And I sank up with the CEO after the interview. And I said, "How'd the interview go?" "Great, we want to hire this guy." And I go, "Okay, great, why tell me about the interview. What did you guys talk about?" And he said to me, "You know, dude, he's an Oklahoma fan. I'm an Oklahoma's fan." We talked about baseball for about 45 minutes. And I was like, "Really? You want to hire because you guys have a common theme or commonality is that going to serve the business?" Is what I asked him. And he's like, "I think so." I'm like, "Oh, man." So the concept of hiring operating system is to, number one, run off your core values and build a really structured interview process that's repeatable and produces a result above and beyond assumptions and bias and personal motives. Right. So it's designed to gather evidence to support whether or not somebody, first off, aligns with your core values. They live values that are similar to what your organization is. And then secondarily, if they bring the track record or the skills that could transfer over, that could potentially help them grow as well as help your organization grow. I pulled a page from kind of what I learned. I went through an Amazon process quite a few years ago. And if you read about Amazon's interview process, they do behavioral interviewing, and it's designed to figure out whether or not you align with their values. And arguably, from the very beginning, they've grown to be the largest company through this interview process. Successful for them, the rest of the organization, that's a whole another thing. But that one piece is probably the reason why they've been so successful in their growth.

Tim Fitzpatrick
The frameworks that we need to be successful in our business, they're already out there. Right. We don't need to reinvent the wheel. So the hiring operating system, if I'm hearing you right, is based on some of that experience and some of the things that you've seen, and now you're just taking this hiring operating system either if you're hiring for a company, you're running people through that, or you're showing them how to implement the system within their business.

Rick Girard
Yeah. It's actually a plug and play system down to the scripts of what to say and how to deliver it and how to extract the right data. Everything is structured out so that when you go in for an interview, you have your pre-assigned questions and sub questions underneath them to kind of really dig deep underneath the hood to find out who that human across the desk is.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Rick Girard
Who they really are. We tend to be really surfacing in an interview. I swear to God, to me, it's like interviews tend to be like speed dating. Right. You're going to make a decision to spend some time. I mean, no wonder why most companies fail at it. If you just go in and you don't really have a process, you have a 51% chance you're going to make the wrong hire. I'd rather kind of caution on the side of like, I want to get the right person in and not burn all this capital.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Rick Girard
And it's not good for the person who you hired either, because they're not in a spot that they're going to thrive in.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Got it. Does the system help attract the right people as well, or does it just help with I've got the person. Now I need to make sure they're the right person.

Rick Girard
Yeah, it does. So the way we build the system is that we start with actually building out those core values and putting measurables into the core values. Those core values then are actually put into the job description, that content, that wording. Because again, we want the right person to be able to resonate with that and then apply, right, or respond to you. And then secondarily, the core values are built into the interview questions. Now when you ask common interview questions to somebody like, where do you want to be in five years? Or walk me through your resume or just all these, if you were the size of a diamond put in a blender, how would you get out?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Rick Girard
They may be challenging that. None of those are tied to anything, right. So how are you evaluating people? You're evaluating people, again, based on your opinion. And that's not the best data points. But when you have a structured interview, number one, you're telling people that you're serious about your business. So one of the common themes that I've seen with really high performers is they don't want to go in and work with some fly by night company. They want to go work with A players who take things seriously and they want to conquer the world. And if you're going to be lack of days go about your interview process, you're not showing them that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So it sounds like the questions that you're asking in the interview process aren't as blunt as what do you think of our core values? You're asking questions related to specific elements of your core values to try and pull out whether they're in alignment with those or not.

Rick Girard
Exactly. So I don't want to give them the answers, but I will prep candidates and I'll say, "Hey, look at we do behavioral interviews. This first interview, you're going to get like four questions. Be prepared to go really deep on your answers." Because it's really important that we align in values. And I'm going to tell you which value I'm asking about. But the questions are meant to uncover whether or not somebody really is collaborative or whether or not somebody does have a positive attitude or the things that are important to your organization. I actually learned this from a client one time. It was kind of interesting, and I turned it into a behavioral question. But one of the questions he asked was, "Do you consider yourself to be lucky?" And this was really tied to their core values. And it's interesting because you get people say, "Well, no, I'm not really lucky, but I'm blessed and I'm really happy." So it gives you an outlook on somebody's attitude. And this is what really important to their organization. They had people came in and just said, "No, I'm not lucky. At all. Like if I'm dressed in shorts and I walk outside, it's going to start raining." And they didn't hire those people. But the people that they did hire were the ones that actually felt like they were fortunate and they're lucky and they had a good story behind it. And then what they do is they back into walk me through why you feel you're lucky or walk me through why you don't feel you're lucky. And the stories that people tell, those are way more important than where do you want to be in five years.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So in that case, whatever the value was, let's just say it was something related to having a positive attitude or being resourceful, something like that. They're asking a question. Do you consider yourself lucky to see what people say and from that answer they can pull out, are they in alignment with having a positive attitude or not?

Rick Girard
Well, yeah, you still have to kind of dig underneath the hood, right? There's usually sub questions that are built out. So I try to tie everything to a behavioral question because they're really the most fruitful as far as being able to extract evidence. So I don't like situational questions because what ends up happening is people can fake it, they can lie. If you had a situation like this, what would you do? And a lot of times what we do is we feed them answers. Would you do this? This that's not helpful at all. It's kind of like I think in court they call that leading the witness. Right. But behavioral questions or walk me through a time you did this or walk me through a time you had a hard time with a co worker, talked me something like that. And then there's the sub questions under that are really important. It's getting to, "Okay, well, walk me through the steps that you took to solve the problem. And why was this important to you?" And then you're kind of having more of a conversation, but you're gathering some really rich data on this person far more telling than really any behavioral assessment or anything like that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So do you guys use behavioral assessments or personality profiles in your hiring operating system, or do you steer away from that?

Rick Girard
No. So we don't not in that. It's funny because we have sponsors and I've had a lot of people that are in that business on my show. And what's interesting is they all recommend it. Really? These are leadership tools that you should be using. They are not meant to be used to make a hiring decision, but people use them in that way, and I'm sure they're happy with that. But can you make the wrong decision based on an assessment? Probably. Just like anything else, they can be helpful. But I think that the data you get out of really understanding who the person is and taking that time to do that is far more valuable than what an assessment is going to give you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Rick Girard
And I think the other thing is people do assessments way too soon in the interview process. They'll say, "Hey, look, we like your resume. We're going to send you an assessment, do this, and then we'll tell you if we want to talk to you." Well, that's another one of those kind of like hurdles that you're putting up that gets rid of the bottom 10% and the top 10% because the top 10% of people are busy and they don't care.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Rick Girard
They're not going to jump through your hurdles first. People, naturally, will take the path of least resistance. It's easier for them to work on something else.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it

Rick Girard
Than it is for that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I think this question might take us down a rabbit hole here, and that's not my intention. I just want to get your feedback quickly on this. A lot, especially larger companies are using I don't even know what it's called software. Right. Where somebody submits their resume, it feels like it goes into a black hole. The software is looking for what keywords things like that, and then it's getting filtered. What are your thoughts on that? Is this something that's good to have in your process or not?

Rick Girard
For every large company? Yes. Keep using it, because then we're going to pick off all the good people. Yes. Okay. Companies towards startups. I like small companies, innovation. But no, I don't think it's a good idea because the most valuable content in a resume, to me, is the contact information in the white space. Everything else on a resume is driven. People write their resumes now to not get filtered through those screens. So you're better off just if you get a resume, pick up the phone, call somebody. I've also found that high performers don't have time to write a resume, nor do they care. So the worst resumes are going to probably be the best people and they're going to get filtered out.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Because like you said, they don't have the time. Well, frankly, I don't think they're ever really having a hard time finding a job.

Rick Girard
When's the last time you wrote your resume?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Like never.

Rick Girard
Yeah, I'm certainly not going to do it. And I talk to you guys all the time. They're like, yeah, I'm not going to put together a resume, but I'll do it for you. I got a better tool for it. Anyway, I'll do an assessment of you, my own personal conversation. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Let's talk about what's happening in the current market. Obviously, we're dealing with the pandemic. There's talk about the great resignation. But I think no matter what's happening in the market, there are always opportunities. What are you seeing as the biggest opportunities that are being overlooked in the current market?

Rick Girard
Well, first off, there's some data out there. Like everybody's kind of in this feeding frenzy for talent and they're all fishing in the same pool. So everybody's using job boards. And I believe, like last month there was over 11 million job postings on Indeed. And the average over the past few years, preprint prepandemic was like between four and 6 million at a time. So we've blown up. So if you're spending money on job boards, I'd rethink it. I think a shift in mindset right now is at least for us, what's working? Go hunt in the pools where people aren't fishing. What I've been advising, like a lot of my founders that I work with and a lot of our clients is work in your calendar a block of 45 minutes to an hour a week where all you do is you just kind of go through LinkedIn or some of the social platforms and just identify people that would be good for your role. Send them a quick note. "Hey, I'm the CEO of this company, and I'd be interested in learning a little bit more about your background. Maybe we can grab coffee at some time."

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Rick Girard
Those get much better responses than somebody like me or another recruiter or somebody else reaching out to them. You're a CEO of a company and you're reaching out to somebody. That's a really powerful underutilized tool. I've heard that phrase, your net worth is directly correlated to your network.

Tim Fitzpatrick
To your network.

Rick Girard
Yeah. So take advantage of that. Like network. Nobody's doing it right now. Everybody's just trying to. It's a feeding frenzy off of Indeed and all the job boards, which, again, you'll have some results, but you don't need to see 300 resumes for you to hire one person. It's overkill. But when you can talk to two or three people that you're targeting in on, it puts you in a position where you're going to make one hire with a minimal time expense and you're not going to burn your team's time more importantly. Interviewing ten to 15 people, having your whole team go out and interview that. How much time are you burning? The productivity right there. Yeah. So we really have to get out of that mindset of I need to see a lot of candidates

Tim Fitzpatrick
And then we're going to make a decision.

Rick Girard
Then we're going to make a decision. And by the way, the other thing is you're not making the decision anymore.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah they are.

Rick Girard
100%. There's no selection process anymore. It's completely shifted. And even I get a lot of CEOs that I know that complain about we just can't find good people. Well, of course, the only way that you're looking is you're just posting and praying that somebody's going to respond.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. No matter what the market, if you want to hire great people, I kind of think it's always up to them because they have opportunities. Right. So no matter whether there's a bunch of jobs out there or not, great people, they got their pick.

Rick Girard
So they do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. You need to stand out.

Rick Girard
Yes, 100%. If you don't, then prepare to fail. I don't know. There's a lot of habits that are acceptable to me. It's not acceptable to be building a business and burn through a ton of especially if you have investors burned through a ton of investor capital experimenting. It just doesn't make any sense, especially when your goal is to get the profitability in revenues as quickly as possible. But it's like the mindset is widely accepted that that's the case.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. You touched on this. I want to pull this out. Do you also think that one of the biggest opportunities is for executives to shift their mindset on what they're doing? Right. I just read an article last couple of days about companies that rethought everybody's got to be in the office, and because of the pandemic, they have completely shifted like they never thought they would do it, and now they're shifting to all remote. That's not to say that everybody needs to shift all remote, but sometimes the way you've always been doing things aren't necessarily the right way to do it, but people get stuck in that rut. What are your thoughts on that?

Rick Girard
I think the military has the same adapt or perish. Right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Rick Girard
Look, you have to do what's best for the business. I mean, there's some businesses where you can't have people not in the office, but a lot of roles, you don't need people in the office. And the hybrid model is working out pretty well for a lot of companies. Yeah. I've had a couple of companies like myself. I can't work that well from home. I have too many distractions. I'm like, "Oh, I'm going to go make a lunch. And that ends up taking on wonder what's on Dr. Phil. I didn't watch that stuff." But, I mean, there's too many distractions for me. Or I go to walk the dog and that takes a lot longer. Yeah, but I do enjoy the hybrid model, and some people do. Some people are really tied into I want to be 100% remote. I'm super productive. Let them be. If you got a high performer who's doing well in that environment, let them work the way they're working the best. But again, I think we've kind of come to grips with that. I think the companies that are trying to force the issue are the ones that are paying the price for it by losing people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, they are. And they're going to continue to have recruiting issues. They're not going to find good people.

Rick Girard
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So this has been a fantastic conversation. You've dropped some serious value here, Rick. Is there any last-minute thoughts you want to leave us with today?

Rick Girard
Yeah, you kind of hit. I would recommend that everybody really kind of look at their mindset behind hiring and shift your perspective, because there's really no reason. I'm not seeing with some of the people I work with that we're having that difficult of time. I think the most difficult time that we're having in the recruiting process is that we're reaching out to people. People have just been so inundated with emails and content that they're just taking longer to get back. And you have to be like really persistent. But your biggest asset is if you're the owner of a company, is you is to be able to just drop a note because no CEOs are actually doing that. And we've got a couple of clients we work with that are getting 100% response rate back on people that they're just dropping a quick note and saying, "Hey, I'd like to get to know you. We don't have anything for you right now, but we might. And it'd be good for us to get to know each other." it's a very easy thing to do. And then when you're ready to pull the trigger, you make that phone call, they come in, interview, and boom, they already know who you are. It becomes easy. So creating like a proactive process and then building it around your values. If you haven't taken the time to develop your values, then you're going to get your lunch eaten for you, because the companies that are, they're the ones who are not having a hard time hiring right now.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, got it. So a couple of places people can learn more about you. One is your website, which is Stridesearch.com, right?

Rick Girard
Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And then you also have a podcast HIRE. I initially put this in as H-I-G-H-E-R-I should have known. It's H-I-R-E, Hire Power Radio, right?

Rick Girard
Correct.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. And I'm assuming you're just talking about all things hiring on your show.

Rick Girard
No, it's a religious show.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Right up my alley.

Rick Girard
It's all things hiring, actually. We bring in a lot of entrepreneurs and we share a lot of their stories on maybe bad hires they made and lessons learned from it. And then we bring in some experts and we talk about best tactics and strategies to make sure that you're landing the strongest people for your company.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Well, if you fired, any entrepreneur that has hired any people has made that mistake. And I'm sure we all have some horror stories.

Rick Girard
I know I'm guilty.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I've got a few and it was my fault.

Rick Girard
It's always our fault.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, that's right. Awesome. Rick, thank you so much. Guys, Rick obviously knows what the hell he's talking about. If you are in growth mode, you're looking to hire people and you need a system in place, reach out to him, go to Stridesearch.com. Sure he would be happy to chat with you. Rick, I appreciate you taking the time. Those that are watching, listening, really appreciate it. Again, I'm Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. If you are struggling with your marketing, you're not quite sure what that next right step is to get where you want to go or you feel like you're throwing spaghetti up against a wall just hoping something is going to stick, hop on over to our website. Rialto Marketing dotcom. It's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing dot com. Click on the get a free consult button. Be happy to chat with you and give you some clarity on what those next steps should be for you. Thanks so much for watching. Till next time. Take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

Do you know you have an opportunity for revenue growth and are unsure how to make it happen? Do you lack someone with the time, skill set, and desire to take ownership of marketing to drive results?

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