Traffic Building Tips To Boost Your Marketing & Generate More Leads

August

19

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Without traffic coming to your website, you’ll be relegated to just another best-kept secret. Eric Seropyan from This Is My South Bay specializes in driving traffic to his clients' websites. I’m going to pick his brain so you can learn some of the latest and greatest tips in driving traffic and generating leads.

Join Eric Seropyan and Tim Fitzpatrick for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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Traffic Building Tips To Boost Your Marketing & Generate More Leads



Tim Fitzpatrick
Without traffic coming to your website, you're just relegated to another best kept secret. You gotta have traffic coming to your website. And our special guest today specializes in driving traffic to his clients websites. What I'm going to do today is I'm going to pick his brain, learn some of the latest and greatest tips in driving traffic and generating leads. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe you've got to remove your revenue roadblocks if you want to accelerate revenue growth, and marketing should not be difficult. I am super excited to have with me today Eric Seropyan from This Is my South Bay. Eric, welcome. Thanks for taking the time.

Eric Seropyan
Thank you, Tim. Thanks for having me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, absolutely. I'm excited to dig into this. A lot of people want to know how to drive more traffic, so we're going to talk about that. You're going to share some of your expertise. Before we do that, I want to ask you some rapid fire questions to help us get to know you. Are you good to go?

Eric Seropyan
Sure. Always.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Eric Seropyan
Well, I live in Los Angeles, so I live close to the beach, so volleyball. Beach volleyball.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Love it. Whenever I think of beach volleyball, I think of the beach volleyball scene from the original Top Gun. What's your hidden talent?

Eric Seropyan
I'm going to say I'm a little bit kinetic. I can kind of feel my way around.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's a cool hidden talent. What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Eric Seropyan
I've been given this, and I always give it to prospects and clients. Rome wasn't built in a day. Don't expect immediate results in life just because you just start doing it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That is fantastic advice. I think this is like marketing's own fault because there's plenty of people out there that are promising quick results.

Eric Seropyan
Exactly.

Tim Fitzpatrick
When in reality, Rome was not built in a day. Marketing is not a switch you can turn on or off. So. I love that advice. What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Eric Seropyan
Well, I think that when I meet someone new, they're kind of surprised that I'm in the field that I'm in. I don't think that I fit the mold of a techie person, so they're always surprised.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What does success mean to you?

Eric Seropyan
Time. I want to be able to have my time to myself and I can decide how I want to spend it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Eric Seropyan
Besides home? I would say the beach.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And what qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Eric Seropyan
I like being around people that are positive, so it kind of wears off on people if you're positive. And it's kind of this energy that bounces back and forth between people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. So, Eric, tell us a little bit more about what you do at This Is My South Bay. What types of clients are you working with? How are you helping them?

Eric Seropyan
Sure. So we have to back up. I live in the South Bay part of Los Angeles. I've grown up there. LA has about 25 million people, about 10 million of that. That's it. It's a small town, and about a million of them live in the South Bay part of Los Angeles. And so I love the area. I've grown up there. I live there. And I use it almost like a case study for small businesses to be able to do hyper local digital marketing campaigns. And so I always try to drive the point home that don't get stuck with the numbers, because you have sometimes people that are trying to get a million followers on social media, or they're trying to get a million followers a day on their website and like, ridiculous, crazy numbers. So be focused on the audience that you're trying to lock into. And so we kind of use our example to show the clients what can happen. Because if you own, let's say, a local restaurant in Seattle, for example, it doesn't really matter if you have 10,000 followers from Russia or Finland, or it has to be somewhat of a geotargeted campaign. And it could be 500 followers, it could be 5000 followers. It doesn't matter as long as you're able to have the right audience and to monetize them.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So one of the main ways that people initially look at driving traffic is SEO. Tell us what's happening with SEO in 2022, what's changing? What's new? Where are things at?

Eric Seropyan
Well, at this point, everybody has kind of thrown their hat into the ring as far as digital marketing goes, and there's a lot of competition. And so Google is trying to figure out how to be able to rank a website and for your audience that doesn't just kind of back up. When you go to Google and you type in a service or product that you're looking for, and you have the results page that comes up. Usually have the top three that are sponsored, the first three search results, and the bottom three, two or three that are sponsored. But that fat middle ten are organically placed there by Google. You can't buy that real estate. It's there because Google is thinking, okay, user, you should meet this website, you should visit this website. It's almost like it's playing matchmaker. And so that's the traffic that comes in that you can't buy it. And it's very clean traffic that comes in. Generally, it's exactly what the client is looking for, and it's yours to lose if you're in the top ten. Usually if I'm searching for something, I'll go to the first three to ten results, and if I can't find it, then I'll go deeper. But generally within the first ten, I'm able to find what I'm searching for. And so there's a lot of competition for that ranking. Now, what Google does through its algorithm changes is it tries to make sure that it does a good job delivering those search results, because there have been other search engines before Google that have come and gone that haven't been as successful as Google. And in my opinion, the secret sauce for Google has been that they are user centric, whereas other search engines have been more advertiser centric. And so Google has thought, if I make the users happy, the advertisers will find me. We'll worry about the revenue second. And so what's happened is they've been able to deliver such good search results to the users that a lot of us are going straight to Google when we're searching something. If we just got into a car accident, we're looking for a lawyer or our plumbing just burst or whatever, like at that moment, we're searching on a search engine, generally. We're not going to social media or we're not going through our emails. We're going straight to a search engine to find it. So some of the trends for 2022, I would say, is focused on hyper local, like in Los Angeles. If you were to type in, let's say, French restaurant, for example, it's a huge city, and there are many restaurants that would fit that category. But if you put a suburb, let's say Beverly Hills instead of Los Angeles, or you put in Santa Monica or whatever, you're going to get a Santa Monica French restaurant or whatever, you're going to get exactly what you're looking for. That keyword and the fact that it's localized. Always keep that in mind. We always keep that in mind when we're creating pages that we want to go after the zip codes and the suburbs of a particular town. Content is king always. We want to make sure that it's easy for the reader to digest and that Google understands it. So when we create content, we have two audiences. We can't do one without the other, because if we entice Google to rank us with the keyword, with the content that we have, they come to the site, but it's not really written for a human to understand it. You're not going to convert, and vice versa. If you write it just for the reader and you don't make it clear to Google what that page is about, then you're not going to get the ranking, you're not going to get the traffic. So you're almost speaking to two audiences. You want to make sure that you get right to the point as far as content quality goes. Make sure that you lay things out in bullet points so people can just skip to the section that they're interested in. FAQ kind of pages work out great because you can go straight to a situation that you have and be able to have it answered. I think mobile always has been growing for a number of years now. That the majority of traffic that's online is mobile right now. And so we want to make sure that the website is mobile friendly, that sometimes even website designers, they don't realize that they should check how the website looks on mobile. And when Google is ranking your website, it looks at your mobile first and your desktop second. And so keep that in mind. It has to have a good user experience. Load time needs to be good. If it takes 10 seconds to load, you're not going to get ranked. And even if you got ranked, if your website were to get ranked, probably you're going to lose the user because they're going to be waiting and they're going to be like, I'm done with this website, let me go to the next site.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, they're impatient, right?

Eric Seropyan
Yeah. So those are some of the top trends for 2022. I think that you have to think of the user coming in. They have a short attention span. So get right to the point about where you are, what you offer with images, with written content, and if it's something that you offer pricing, or if they can book online to come into your MedSpa or to your dental office or whatever you have, make sure that they don't have to sit there and call you and then be on hold. And then the receptionist transfers you. And everything should be right there as easy as possible. There are still people that are going to call with questions, or they'd rather book in person as opposed to online. But more and more people are comfortable with booking online, paying online, purchasing online, et cetera.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So there are a couple of things you said that I want to pull out here and tell me if I'm right here. First, the Google algorithm at this point is incredibly smart. Some of the things that businesses were doing even eight to ten years ago, that's actually going to hurt you now. So we can't really game the algorithm. The other thing you said was about content. And I guess my question to you about content is, is it really even possible to have a solid SEO plan that doesn't include some type of consistent content creation at this point?

Eric Seropyan
It's very difficult to get ranked. Yeah, it could be that you're in a tiny town and there's no competition and you're the only business in town that offers that and it's a local business, then yes, you'll be fine. But as far as having any competition, it's going to be difficult to get ranked without having content creation.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. And when you talk about content creation, are you talking about things like blog posts? Or is it they're updating content on static pages on the site? What does that look like? Or is it a combination?

Eric Seropyan
A couple of things. You want to mix things up. You don't want to just be doing one type of content. So you can do, let's say, for example, a monthly podcast, like something like what we're doing here. You could record it, and then upload it to your YouTube channel. Take the video embedded onto your website like a blog post, and you have a piece of content, infographics, blog posts. There's different things that you can do to create content. So I would say to mix things up if you don't know what to create, my suggestion always the beauty of the Internet is there are no secrets. Everybody's online, go look at your competitors, see what they're doing. A lot of times what we ask when we're onboarding a client is, give us your top ten or so competitors. Let's take a look at them. Let's see what they're doing. Because every small business has a story where when we're onboarding them, they say, if I could be like so and so down the street, I'm going to be happy they're doing well, they have a line out the door, et cetera. And so we're able to look and see what keywords they're ranked for, where they're getting links from, what kind of content they're creating. Everything's out and open. There are no secrets. And so a lot of times, even when we're onboarding, before, I used to say, give me keywords that you want to rank for. Now what I do is I take their top ten competitors that they want to target, and we run reports on keywords that they've ranked for, and we start with that. As opposed to having our clients take a pencil to paper and stare at the ceiling and think of keywords that work for their business. So once you have that list of keywords that their competitors rank for, they can check off the ones that they would love to rank for. And from that list, they get ideas, because every business is a little bit different, so they add some other keywords that are maybe not on that list there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Thank you for that. So if people are listening to this and they're thinking, gosh, SEO is something that I need to maybe start looking at. Well, the first thing I would say is, guys, SEO can get incredibly complicated. There's all kinds of variables with SEO. So hiring somebody like Eric who can help you with this, I think is a wise investment. But before they even go down that path, are there things that they need to be focusing on before they really start their SEO journey?

Eric Seropyan
Absolutely. So what you need to keep in mind is when you're starting your SEO journey, is that you can think of, let's say you would run an ad during Black Friday in a newspaper back in the day or even now, and you would have the Black Friday specials. That's very immediate. Like, here it is, we have it. It expires in four days to take advantage of the situation, the sale, et cetera. With SEO, it's almost like a marathon. It's not like you can just flip the switch or turn on the engine and be going, it's the long game. So you have to prepare yourself for that and you have to make sure that you have certain things in place that are consistently happening. And so what I would say is in the beginning, before you get started, you have to have an understanding and expectation that is aligned with reality a lot of times, and it's good to be surprised when things go better. But there is a way that you could spend ten times the budget and in the first 90 days you may have the same results as if you spent one 10th of the budget. So it just takes time to get things rolling. It would be great to have a twelve month plan, a six month plan, a three month plan and a one month plan. Like here's what we're doing the first 30 days and by the end of the quarter this will be done and then halfway through the year this will be done. And this time next year we're going to have this. And the twelve month is probably looking too far out, but just to kind of get an idea of where we want to be, where we will be happy when we get there. Things to do that are within your control because you can't control what Google is going to rank you for. Things that are within your control are to make sure that the website is functioning properly.That the pages are tagged correctly so Google can read it. You may go into a page and you see on the back end, google doesn't know if it's the contact page, if it's the About Us page, if it's the product page. You need to make sure that on the back end, when Google goes in, inspires your website for a split second, everything is crystal clear to Google what it is. We want to make sure that the user has a good user experience. Sometimes you go on to websites and then you go down the funnel and you're ready to purchase and the shopping cart doesn't work or the contact page has expired or there's broken links within the website or it takes forever to load. These are not what any of us would consider a good user experience. And we get frustrated when we leave. And in the back of our mind we don't really even remember the website that we went to. We just remember that we found that website through Google and we have a bad feeling towards Google if that happens too often. And so we want to make sure that the website has a good user experience. Those two things right there, as far as having a plan and making sure that the website is optimizable, those are within your control. You want to make sure that it's mobile friendly again, like we talked about earlier, because a lot of people overlook that. To run reports on it on mobile as well as desktop to see if there are any issues moving forward on the website.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love this. So these are really some fundamental things that you've got to have in place if you want to maximize the return on your SEO efforts. The other thing that I would add to this is even going before some of these fundamental things that your website needs to be fast, it's got to be optimized on-page optimization is at a higher level marketing strategy, do you really understand who your ideal clients are? And what do you say to those people to grab their attention and their interest? If somebody can approach you with that information, that makes your job much easier from an SEO standpoint as well, does it not?

Eric Seropyan
Absolutely. And we found that a lot of times we have something that we do where we ask the client for a target market, like an actual person that over and over again they're coming into the store or whatever, and sometimes it just doesn't match up and they're shocked. They think it's women between the age of this and it turns out to be men within a different age group. So it's kind of interesting. And I don't say it so that we drop the audience that they're interested in and go after another audience, but we can target a second audience also. And so there are places again, another beauty of the Internet is if you find that there's a particular demographic that is loving your service or product, we know where they're hanging out. And so we can advertise on those social media channels or go after those keywords on Google, et cetera. So it's very important. That's why when we do the onboarding part of it, we ask a whole bunch of questions as far as target audience and competitors and things like that, to kind of bring into focus, who are we going after, who are we talking to, who are we trying to entice? And it can't be a shotgun blast because the internet is just too expensive. You can't be talking to all 300 million people in America. It's just not going to happen. And so if your audience is, let's say, 50,000 within a certain town and a certain service that they would be interested in, let's go after them. That's a big audience that will change your business completely if we can get a percentage of those people to come to walk into your store or to use your service or whatever you're offering. But as far as just trying to do everything to everybody, that's very difficult to do for a small business or a midsize business.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I think you're going to be disappointed if you invest in SEO and you can't approach somebody like you, Eric, and say, hey, these are the ideal clients we intend to attract. And here's what we say to them. You're not going to be happy. You're going to attract poor quality leads or your conversions on your website are going to suck because the messaging is not good. There's not a clear journey. So you got to have that. You got to have the other stuff you touched on the on page SEO. You want to make sure your website from a speed standpoint, has been optimized. There's a lot of different moving parts here, but you want to make sure in place, otherwise you're not going to get a good return on the investment. One of the other additional things I want to ask you on SEO is as somebody goes down this journey and they start to reach out to people like you, Eric, what types of things should they be looking for? Like, for example, I've had clients where they've received SEO proposals, and they don't even know what keywords the company is going to target. They don't know how much volume there is. I've seen people getting SEO reports and it's like, hey, you're on page one for underwater basket weaving in wherever tim buck two. And they're like, oh my God, I rank on page one. Yes. And that keyword has five searches a month. Is that really helping your business? So this is a long, widgeted way of saying, what should they be looking out for? That may be red flags that like, gosh, this is probably not the information that I should be getting.

Eric Seropyan
I'm going to say something that maybe people are not going to like.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's all good.

Eric Seropyan
So precovid and fingers crossed after COVID, there's a search engine academy here in Los Angeles that I teach at. I teach courses on search engine optimization. And it's an entire week, and it's almost like learning a language in a week. And then you get homework, you go home, you come back another six or 8 hours in the classroom, and you go back and so on. And then you have to implement it. You'll be surprised. A lot of the students that come in, they're not looking to do digital marketing as a career. What they're looking for is they tried the person in another country. They tried their neighbors kid that said that he could upload some things onto their website or on Facebook or whatever. They've gone through some things that are not working, and they see that their competitor is doing their digital marketing campaign and they're killing it. And so they're tired of not knowing what it is and how to do it. How does it work, how do you optimize your website for a search engine? And they have a whole bunch of questions. And so they come in and we go through like 1000 slides, and 99% of them are not going to do it. They just want to be able to hire someone and be able to speak the language. Because when you explain link building to somebody that doesn't know what online link building is, and what the power of that is, or citation building or reputation management or whatever, when they don't know what it is. It's just words and it's just reports. So my suggestion is, if this is important to someone in your audience that's listening, you have to study up a little bit on what triggers Google to give you that ranking. I wrote an article on what upsets Google because I've had situations where in the beginning, when I was starting off, I did some things that really upset Google, not knowingly I had one situation that I always talk about. It stuck in my mind where I had a writer, a blogger, and I gave that person content to write. They wrote it, I took it. I paid him for his time. I took it, uploaded it to my clients website. It turns out that he was just doing a copy paste job. And so Plagiarism is a big no no for Google. And so you have to figure out what upsets Google and make sure that you don't do that. And it's not like you can read an article and see that it's plagiarized. There are apps that you flush it through to make sure that it's not anywhere online, that it's authentic new content and so on. So these are things that if someone is looking to, you know, they're going to run their business. Because I find that a lot of people they have a business to run. They have a family. They have things like they don't have time to take this on 100% and do it themselves. But they should know a little bit about what they're getting into before they throw their hat in the ring. Or else otherwise you're at the mercy of the marketer telling you whatever they're telling you. And like you said, the example that you gave, that a particular keyword that they're ranked for, does it help? Does it not help? It's difficult to tell with your business unless you have the conversions set up. We have some things that we do where we track the conversions. It could be that a form fill, it could be that you have a chat on your website. If they start typing from a campaign that we sent them to the website, it'll let us know. We do phone tracking. So if someone calls your company from our campaigns, not from what you're already doing, but from our campaigns, it will let us know that, hey, this phone call came in from our services. Like, it'll be in the report. So that way the client at the month can look and say, okay, I got 100 phone calls that came in and I listened to them, or I had somebody at the company listen to them. Out of the 100, we closed 35 of them. And so you can actually do a return on investment to see if it's worth it with the money that you've spent versus there's different ways to do this. But to answer your question, because I could talk about this for hours.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, we could go down this road.

Eric Seropyan
And you have to be able to have some understanding of digital marketing. And I don't mean that you can build a website or you can do these things, but you have to understand almost like a high level view of what's going on. So when I talk about, hey, we need to spend some time on reputation management, we need to get some Yelp reviews, or we need to get some Google reviews, you understand the importance of that and ways to entice people to do some of the things that you want to do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love this point. So I'm going to add one thing. So you either need one of two things. You need to educate yourself so that you at least have a high level understanding, so that you can have a conversation with somebody that's doing SEO and understand what they're talking about, or you need to have somebody on your team who can do that for you. That doesn't mean that you have to. It could be somebody in house. It could be there's people like us that do fractional chief Marketing Officer work. Right. Somebody that can have that conversation with the people that are doing the SEO work for you. You need one of those two things. Otherwise, like you said, Eric, you're kind of at the mercy of whoever you're working with. And that's not a good place to be, in my opinion..

Eric Seropyan
For either party.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Exactly. Yes, exactly.

Eric Seropyan
The thing with the digital marketing, especially SEO, is that you have to have faith that in the long term, this is going to be very good for your business. And we find it over and over again that when we have the campaigns running and it runs for a certain amount of time, the bulk of the leads, the qualified leads, come in from SEO, but it takes time. It's not like Google is going to just hand you the keys to the car and say, here, it's yours. They have other people, other websites that have put in the time, that have optimized. And I don't like using war analogy, so I'll use it. It's almost like we're not battling, but we're kind of positioning for that real estate. And so for us to get ahead, we have to jump ahead of someone that's already there. Sometimes they're ahead, sometimes they're number one and we're number four, and sometimes we're number two. And it's this thing that goes back and forth. And so you have to be consistent with it. And it is something I don't work for Google. I'm not selling Google. The bulk of the searches online are from Google. We all go to a couple of these websites like Bing and Yahoo and Google. When we're searching for something and we are ready to purchase, we are ready to reserve that restaurant, or we need a tune up for a car or whatever. We're towards the end of. The funnel. As far as searching goes, this is not a branding exercise. This is, you know, I'm here. I'm ready to service you right now, and the user is ready to buy.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So I want to shift gears a little bit. Eric, we've been talking about SEO or search engine optimization. One of the other common ways people drive traffic, and a lot of SEO people do this is they use paid advertising in conjunction with SEO. You use paid advertising to drive more immediate leads while you're doing your SEO work. When you think about paid advertising, most people think of Google Ads, retargeting ads, Facebook ads. One thing that almost nobody talks about is Yelp advertising. And before, when you reached out about being on the podcast, I saw that you did Yelp advertising. So I want to talk about Yelp advertising because a lot of business owners do not like Yelp. We don't need to go down that rabbit hole. But I know of at least two or three people that I have talked to who are doing Yelp advertising, and it is working phenomenally well for them. So much so that one of them just stopped doing Google Ads altogether and put all their money into Yelp advertising. Their cost per lead was better. They were getting better leads. So tell me more about Yelp advertising. I mean, who does it work for? Because it doesn't work for everybody. What types of businesses is Yelp advertising really strong for?

Eric Seropyan
It's an interesting question. We're a Yelp advertising partner, so we work directly with Yelp. So as opposed to doing it yourself, calling Yelp or whatever and being a complete stranger, you would call our agency and we would try to resolve issues. Or maybe you brought on a new service and you want to add those services to your campaign. And whatever the case may be, we do it from A to Z. When you work with an advertising partner, when someone is searching for you in particular, your competitors don't come up. It's just you. As opposed to when you're working on your own, they search you on Yelp in particular, but they're like, by the way, there are these other people that offer the same service. Just below your name. You get one video on your carousel when you work with an advertising partner versus if you work on your own. So Yelp is trying to have you work with advertising partner so that companies like us can give better service. Yeah, usually there's no cost to this. Generally, we don't charge. Some agencies probably charge, but we don't charge for the service. It's just another way for us to service our clients. So as far as Yelp goes, it's been hit and miss, mostly hit. There are situations where it just doesn't work out, and within a month or so, you know what that is. Generally, it has to do with reviews. The client doesn't have enough reviews or has bad reviews.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Eric Seropyan
You need to make sure that the reviews coming in are organic. So I'll give you an example, and this applies to everything, whether you're doing content creation, like, suddenly you don't have any content, and suddenly you have 500 pieces of content. It looks weird to Google. We had a client where they were in business for about five years. They didn't have any reviews. So I said we should get some reviews. And they're like, well, we have an email list of all of our happy with our clients. All of them are happy. Fine, great. So we did an email blast to these people. I forgot what it was. We got like 400 reviews in one month. We started zero that month. End of the month, we had 400 reviews, and then we didn't receive another review for another three years. So it looks weird to Google and to Yelp and its algorithm. So you want to make sure that you have a consistent grip. You have reviews that are coming in. If it's going to be 100 a year, make sure it's one or two a week, four or five a month, ten a month, as opposed to all of them in one month, it doesn't work. So as far as things that when it doesn't work, it could be that they didn't target the keywords properly. It could be that the campaign wasn't set up correctly. If you're able to do those things correctly and get the reviews coming in, and if you have at least a four star on Yelp, it's a very good tool. And it's a tool that's overlooked. And it's a big tool, because what happens is when somebody goes to your website, they're trying to fill you out to see if they want to get your service. They'll check out your social media, check out a couple of pages on your website, and towards the end of their decision, whether they're going to make the decision or not, they go to your reputation. It could be Facebook reviews, it could be Google reviews, it could be Yelp reviews. But they want to see what others are saying about you. And so you have to make sure that you give your reputation management campaign some attention and some love, because if you don't, your competitors are doing that. And so make sure that you have some kind of campaign running. Even if you're not paying, make sure that you're posting there, that you're answering questions. Usually one of the things that Yelp will look at is your reply time. Now, we had one client that was complaining that their competitors are doing very well on Yelp and they're not, and things like that. And so when we on boarded them, we took a look at their reply time, and it was over 2 hours. Whereas their competitor was around ten minutes. So you have to be able to our attention span is so small that we ask a question. If we don't get an answer within a short amount of time, we just go to the next person, the next company, or we get frustrated or whatever. And so 2 hours. And sometimes they would tell me that message came in on a Friday night an hour after we closed, and then we open Monday and we don't check our messages until Monday morning. And that screws up our reply time. Well, you figure it out. Make sure that you get a notification on your phone that someone from your company answers it at least to say, we're closed, we'll have an answer for you, something. And so there are certain things that we consult our clients on that help in the algorithm. You are not going to get ranked in the algorithm if your reply time is 2 hours. And so there are things that people will say, well, it didn't work for me. And we kind of do an audit to see, well, why didn't it work? Because it's a huge platform. There's a ton of traffic coming there. And it's usually when you get down to reputation management, they're right at the end of the funnel. They're ready to buy, and we want to make sure that we're right there. We have the right keywords in place. We have the right geographically, we've dropped a pin in the right area with the right radius and the right services and everything, and that we're giving them good service. One thing that I always find that I preach all my clients on is when I look at a service that I'm going to use and I go to Yelp and I check the client, I always go to the One Stars right away. And so I want to see what happened that this person gave a bad review. I know that we can't make 100% of the people happy 100% of the time. And so what I'm looking for is, what does the brand do once there's a negative review? Are they responding? Are they insulting the client? Are they trying to make it right? What are they doing? Because sometimes if the service just wasn't what the client was expecting and the brand says, we're sorry you had a bad experience, we would love to make it up to you. Here's what we can offer. Or call this number and ask for this person, and we would love to give you a complimentary whatever. As opposed to if I look at the reviews and they haven't replied over and over again, the bad reviews, they don't reply, and the good reviews, they reply. Or they reply to the angry client with an insult that's the last thing you want is they had a bad experience.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's not a good look.

Eric Seropyan
Yeah. And then the brand insults you on top of that. So there are certain things that we try to help our clients with in consulting with, because this is a big part of SEO because Google looks at your reputation on the top three reputation sites and forums and everything, it's scraping everything to see what people are saying about you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So Yelp Advertising is it primarily for local service based businesses?

Eric Seropyan
I find that local businesses do well with it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay.

Eric Seropyan
But if you have an ecommerce site, obviously you want to make sure that you have good reviews. It works for everything. Reviews, if you're doing whatever you're doing, when they land on your site, a lot of people will go to your reviews. So you have to have a healthy drip of reviews coming in. People a lot of times ask me, how many reviews should I have? And I always say, okay, let's take a look at the top ten competitors that you gave. Let's see how many they have just to get an idea. It's not like if they have 100 and you have 50, if we get to 50, it's not like we're going to beat them or something like that, but just to kind of have an idea what's happening out there. And so, again, if you can think of it as, I need to get one review a month or one review a week, or whatever your goal is, and to be able to get that and to get things flowing so that when people land on your website and then go to your reviews, you have good interaction. You're going to have some negative reviews. So it's good to have. If you have one out of 20, that's a one star, but the other 19 are four and five. It's going to be a different representation of your company as opposed to you have three reviews and they're all negative because you're way more likely to complain on Yelp than you are to say that you had an average experience. Most of the reviews are either one star or five star.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So if you're listening to this and you have overlooked Yelp Advertising and you're a local business, I would encourage you to investigate it. Reach out to Eric, talk to him a little bit, and test it and see whether it might work for you, because there's a lot of people that completely overlook it, and I think there's some opportunities there for the right businesses. Eric, this has been a great conversation. Man any last minute thoughts you want to leave us with today?

Eric Seropyan
I would say when it comes to digital marketing, it's a game changer. When you can establish your business and create your own community, just give it some time and be consistent with it, just like anything else in life, whether it's with your friendships, with your family, with your health. It's not like you can eat one healthy meal and suddenly you're healthy, or you just run around the block and you're healthy. You have to kind of work at it, stay with it. And there's a lot of business out there. There's a lot of traffic going through some of these platforms that we talked about and just stick to your plan. And as you're doing your plan, you're going to see that some platforms are working better or some campaigns are working better or worse, and you make adjustments in your plan as you go forward. But stick to it because there's a lot of opportunity out there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where can people learn more about you, Eric?

Eric Seropyan
Sure, they could go to my website, thisismysouthbay.com. And if they want on the homepage there, they can put in their email address and their website address and we'll email them SEO report on their website. If they have any questions on things to do with SEO, they can click on Book Now and book a 30 minutes free consultation. I'll answer any questions they have, any strategies or anything they want to go over, they can book a meeting.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. I love it. Guys, go check out this is my South Bay if you want to talk to Eric, schedule a call with them. Eric, I really appreciate you taking the time. And those of you that are watching, listening, I appreciate you as well. If you want access to the 90 day marketing plan template that we use for our business, for our clients, go to growthmarketingplan.com. At growthmarketingplan.com, I've got the instructions there, the template, some sample plan so that you can start working your plan. As Eric mentioned, you got to have a plan. If you do not have a plan, you're just throwing spaghetti up against a wall hoping something sticks. If you are struggling with your marketing, you're not sure what those next steps for you should be, you can always reach out to us over at rialtomarketing.com that's R-I-A-L-T-O marketing.com. Just book a free GPS call with us and we'll talk to you and give you some guidance on the direction that you should be heading based on where you are and where you want to go. Thanks so much. Until next time. Take care.


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