Turning Clients Into Raving Fans With An Automated Advocacy Machine

March

22

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Can your business grow like clockwork? The answer is absolutely yes, but you've got to have marketing working for your business. Our special guest today is going to share an awesome way to accomplish this. It is called Advocacy Marketing. You don't want to miss this conversation.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Billy Robbins for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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Turning Clients Into Raving Fans With An Automated Advocacy Machine

Tim Fitzpatrick
Can your business grow like clockwork? The answer is absolutely yes, but you've got to have marketing working for your business. Our special guest today is going to share an awesome way to accomplish this. It is called Advocacy Marketing. You don't want to miss this conversation. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe you must remove your revenue roadblocks to accelerate growth, and marketing shouldn't be difficult. Thank you so much for taking the It's time to tune in. I am super excited to have Billy Robbins with Intent Company with me today. Billy, welcome and thanks for being here.

Billy Robbins
Yeah, thank you, Tim. I'm glad to be here. Thanks for inviting me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I'm excited to dig into this with you. Before we do so, I want to ask you a few rapid fire questions...

Billy Robbins
All right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
To get to know you.

Billy Robbins
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Dude, let's jump in, man. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Billy Robbins
Usually hanging with my family. So whatever my kids are into, I'm into. So my 10-year-old big into soccer and Fortnite, so I spend a lot of time. I'm terrible at Fortnite, man. Those 10-year-olds.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's good, man. How many kids do you have?

Billy Robbins
Well, it depends how you define a kid. I have one biological son, he's 10 years old. I have one daughter that we adopted when she was seven years old, but now she's 21. Then we have two other 20-year-olds that live with us that we have pseudo-adopted and just have them in our home and doing life with them and stuff. We love the kids. So we got between one and four, depending on how you want to define it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, cool. I love it. What's your hidden talent?

Billy Robbins
My hidden talent that people know about? Maybe Rubik's Cube.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Rubik's Cube?

Billy Robbins
Yeah, I like solving rubik's cubes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You might be dating yourself a little bit by talking about the Rubik's Cube.

Billy Robbins
I am. There it is. That's another one, though. The kids, if you ever watch on YouTube, you got these 12-year It's like four seconds. It's like unbelievable.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I was never good at Rubik's Cube. But there is a method to the madness.

Billy Robbins
No, it is. Actually, it's all formula. Actually, I always say there's so many analogies with marketing because basically, you just got to be able to address the situation, know what you're looking at, and then know the right formula to get out of it. Actually, the reason I even got into this was, again, because my 10-year-old actually was about four years ago. He goes with mom, and he's like, Oh, I want that. He gets a toy, and then comes home, and he's all like, I have no idea how to do this. Dad, fix it. I'm like, I don't know how to do that. When you don't know how to figure out, what do you do? You go to YouTube University, right? How to solve a Rubik's Cube. I sat there all night long trying to learn it, wrote down these flashcards, figuring it out. And by the time I figured out how to do it, I was hooked. The kid never even played with the thing, and I'm all like, it was like, It's my toy.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. He's like, Dad, can I have my Rubik's Cube back? What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Billy Robbins
Make serving people the priority.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. There's so much great advice, right? And as entrepreneurs, there's so many things that we've learned. It's always hard I have to pick one.

Billy Robbins
I find that the things that are most important to learn are these eternal truths that are just like this. It's like a foundation you put everything on. One of the things we talk about in our business is serve people, solve problems. It sounds almost like a cliché little thing to say, but actually, if you at any given time in our interaction with the client, team, people, whatever situation you say, Am I serving the people I'm called to serve? Am I solving the problem I'm called to solve? That answers a lot of things in business and marketing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What success mean to you?

Billy Robbins
Fulfilling all that God has called me to do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Where's your happy place?

Billy Robbins
On the couch with my family.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What qualities do you value in the people that you spend time with?

Billy Robbins
I want them to have passion for something. I don't even care what it is, but I want people that are passionate, people that are optimistic, people that want more, and they're willing to do things to get it, take risks.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it, man. Tell us more about what you're doing with the Intent Company.

Billy Robbins
Yeah. So Intent Company, we started over seven years ago. I've been in full service digital marketing for the last 19 years and started a a few agencies, buried a few agencies, did corporate executive marketing, got to work with really big companies for about seven years. And then seven years ago, went back out on my own and made the decision that... That's actually where one of that phrase is came up, to serve people, solve problems. And I decided that if I was in this agency, I was only going to work with companies that I had direct connection with the founder who started the company. Because people start companies because of these passions. Usually, you think about it. The reason why you start a business is you see a problem that's in the world that you feel uniquely suited to solve. You want to go after it, and you feel like you can do it better. Maybe you learn that skill in a trade or in a whatever, but then you decide, I'm going to go solve this problem. Or you have a people group that you feel like a connection to go in and serve. For me, it's entrepreneurs. I love entrepreneurs. I love I love people that take risks. I love people that are willing to go and try something new to get more. And so that was really important. And then marketing and technology and all those things is a passion of mine. So that's the way that I can help solve some of their problems. But I remember early on, I made two promises when I started my business. Number one, I said, I want to do work that I love with people I love and for people I love. And so I use that as a thing. My team are people I genuinely care about and I want deposit into their life. The clients that we are, the people that we're serving, are people that I generally care about their mission and what they're after. And then I only want to do work, the type of marketing that's exciting to me. It's marketing, it's business, it's this, it's that. But I want to work on activities that I find passion and fire in, in staying in that place.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Man, if you can check all those boxes, life is good, right?

Billy Robbins
Yeah. You got to be intentional. You got to be intent.

Why Most Marketing Fail

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. You have to know where you want to go, right? Yeah. We're obviously going to talk marketing, man. You and I are both in the space. Why does most marketing fail?

Billy Robbins
Well, I mean, one reason why marketing fails big time today is that there is no predetermined expectation. If you think about it, I think one of the biggest hindrances to business is growth, as I call it shiny toy syndrome. We are constantly bombarded with the Google did this and TikTok came out and that thing and this other thing. And we're chasing all of these tactics. We chase all these little tactics and we got to build the funnel and do the thing. And if you buy the course with the challenge thing and the stuff, and And it's not that any of those things independently are bad marketing strategies where it's not like, oh, that funnel stuff is garbage or that email thing. It's like, no. It's that you're taking a tool like a hammer, but it's not part of It's not like a blueprint. It's not like, I see the empty lot. I can see what we're going to build. We know the people, the timing, the place, and the things, and we put all this stuff together to go and achieve something intentionally. And so that's one of the major reasons, Because when you're doing haphazard random marketing activity, typically, you don't even know what success looks like. You don't know how long you should persevere. You try it, you get frustrated, and then you give up and you try something else. Most leaders of companies, they're the ones, right? Most leaders of companies are visionaries. They see the vision, they see their competitor doing the Insta thing, the YouTube thing, the whatever thing. They're like, Oh, we're going to do that. They try it for three months, doesn't work, waste everybody time, and then they switch. What does that do to the team? It makes them feel frustrated. It makes them feel, Why are we doing this again? We're going to try something new. It's not part of a cohesive strategy. You need to have a philosophy about marketing in a strategic approach first, and then put the different tools and tactics and optimizations place to be successful.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I want to pull some things out because I love this, and I completely agree with everything you just said. When I think of marketing, it's like we're all battling information overload. When When we're battling that, we're overwhelmed. We don't know what to do. And like you said, people just end up throwing stuff up against a wall, hoping something's going to stick, right? And hope is not a marketing strategy. And so the way I look at it is strategy must come before tactics. I think of strategy like that fuel. And then when we put a plan together, that's where we're starting to outline what vehicles we're going to use. Any of the vehicles can work. Frankly, most businesses need fewer vehicles rather than more. They need to go deeper. But when we have a plan of what we're going to do, it helps eliminate that distraction. So that when the newest tactic comes across our screen or in our inbox, we're like, No, man, it's not in our plan. So it doesn't mean no forever. It just means no right now. We're going to work this plan. When people just chase things, they can't measure.

Billy Robbins
No.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And they just spin in wheels.

Billy Robbins
Yeah, and that's the thing. There's really two big principles that we do all of marketing off of that fit exactly what you're saying, Tim. The first thing I always say is I believe the main philosophical way that you should look at marketing, I would say business, is through the eyes of the customer, customer journey marketing. I always say this phrase when I'm talking to new clients or things, I say, Whether someone buys a pack of gum or a Porsche, they must go through the customer journey. They must, one, be aware of that you exist or even aware that they have a problem. Sometimes marketing is you need to create awareness that they have a problem that you solve. So awareness. The second step is affinity. So I would say awareness is like, do I know you? Do I know who you are? Great. Okay. Next step is affinity. Do I like you? The next step is action. And that's what everybody feels like they're going after. I'm going after action. I'm going after sales. But if you really think about what an action step is, is them saying, I believe you. They're saying, You know what? I believe what you're saying enough where I'm willing to pull out my wallet, pull out my credit card, whatever it is, pay you for what you said you're going to do. And most companies stop there, but they're missing the single most important thing that you can be doing is the next step. And it's so obvious, but then so completely underutilized, and that is advocacy. Because somebody can believe you, but it's not until they trust you that they're going to get exponential return. And the trust comes from experience. You did what you said you're going to do. You gave me a great experience. You wowed me, all those different things. Because you got to think, there's one thing to get a transaction. It's another thing to get a customer who tells everybody they know about you, buys again and again, adopts more of your product set, stays longer, signs longer contracts, leaves more positive reviews. And the value of an advocate is easily 30, 60, 100 times more than the average customer. But we don't think in that way. We're just like, I just want the next customer. You and I, we deal with a lot of people in the MSP space and IT and telecom reselling this and that. And I always say to them in a service-based business, Isn't it funny? I said, 80% of your revenue comes from 20% of your customers. Everyone should know. I said, Yeah, because it's the Pareto principle. It's the law, the law of 80/20. But I said, Isn't it interesting that the 20% that give you the most money are the easiest to work with? You enjoy them probably the most personally. They give you the most referrals. You have the most relationship in there. They're like, Yes. I said, The 20% of your revenue that comes from the broad 80 % of your clients, in fact, the ones that spend the least amount of money with you are the hardest to work with. They're the biggest pain in your company. They are the negative detractor, but yet they get all of our attention. The whole squeeky wheel gets the grease thing. But it's like, if we're not intentional about the way we grow a business, literally all the attention in time is going towards this lesser value relationship that's not bringing the revenue. But we don't stop and say, let's focus on the best customers, maximize that relationship with our best customers, because that's where the massive is going to come from. That is in that place, but we just don't do it. Because why? Because they're already settled. They're already satisfied. But be intentional about serving your best customers, and it's going to have the biggest impact on your business.

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The Most Effective Marketing Strategy Today

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's the most effective marketing strategy today?

Billy Robbins
Advocacy marketing. If you already have customers, if you already have customers, you've got a decent customer base, then how you market to your customer after you have them. I would even say even things onboarding. We do a lot of things with automation and help brands automate their onboarding process and things like that. Consistency. You've got to deliver the goods. It's one thing for them to say that they believe you and pay for something. It's another thing for after they've received your product, after they've been onboarded, after that experience that they're like, I love these guys. We have a very strategic system that we do. At the right time, we're asking for reviews, we're doing surveys based on the result, we're asking for referrals, we're getting customer support involved. Life cycle marketing, getting the right upsell at the right time. There's more value there, more opportunity there than there is by trying to do some front-end LinkedIn marketing to get your calendar filled. Now, I'm not against front-end marketing. I'm not against new client acquisition. But if you don't have a solid post-purchase system in place, you're missing it. Dan Kennedy has this great quote, and he says that he who can spend the most money to acquire a customer wins. Now, that's funny. It's like, Well, wait a minute. That's front-end marketing. How to get the most customer. Yeah. But here's the thing. In service business, especially, there's only two ways that you could spend more than your competition to acquire a new customer. One, you skimp on your delivery in your operations. We know those, some of the bigger companies, they spend all of their money on front-end marketing. They don't deliver the goods. They got poor reviews. In fact, most of the people that probably follow you, Tim, they're the ones like, Yeah, I go in and sell them after. Because they've been hurt. They had a terrible relationship, but I deliver the goods and they love me. They skim, literally, on operations, put all their money in the front-end marketing. But the other way you can compete is what if you double the lifetime value of your customer? And that to me, and metric-wise, is probably, if not the single top three most important metrics that you can look at in your business is the lifetime value of your customer. How much does that customer spend over their lifetime? And not only how much do they spend, how many people do they refer and what's the value of their referrals? And then how many do they refer? I mean, if you can grasp the value of what a brand advocate means for your business, it's like a hundredfold increase. And so if you could double the lifetime value of your customer, you could even compete on the front-end more competitively because you get more on the back-end. It's just that I believe it's the most ethical and effective way to market if you're a healthy business and you got a decent client base.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So how would you specifically define advocacy marketing? Is it post-purchase marketing?

Billy Robbins
It can be, but really what it is... I think there's a deeper relationship you can have with your customer. Can people advocate for you that have never bought from you? Sure, they could. They can like you to the point Where I've actually had that. Actually, funny, I was at a major master agent thing last week. I got invited to speak. I was trying to close this client. Never ended up closing the business, but they liked what we talked about so much that they had me be a guest speaker for one of their mastermind groups. They had a room full of MSPs, had me come in talking about advocacy marketing. They were advocating for me, even though technically they're not my client yet. But typically, it's going to be in this idea of I use this phrase, turn your customers into raving fans. Turn your customer into a raving fan because there's a difference. Your customer base looks differently. There are some, again, that love you and some that don't have the best relationship with you. Again, it's just a weird dynamic. The amount of revenue that someone spends with you is almost tied to how much they like you. And this advocacy thing. So you don't ignore your customers. And I'm not saying you're going to be like, Yeah, I did great customer support and so on. But You can communicate with them in a way that elicits them to share more of your stuff, leave more reviews, give you more referrals, buy more of your products. And we don't focus on that area. And again, we do it in a very tactful way. We've got all these different techniques that we use to not feel like you're being salesy and upselling constantly and everything else. But that all comes from if you truly are an organization that is there to serve people and solve their problems, the average MSP, we got 15 to 20 different products and services that they offer. But on the option, there's four or five on average that their clients are having. That means that 75% of their product mix is not being adopted on a regular basis. What would happen to a company You have half of that got adopted? Massive revenue increase, and you didn't even have to spend $1 on advertising. You didn't have to give Google money, you didn't have to go buy Facebook ads, Insta ads, whatever. Again, not against those things, but you're missing the big thing, the big awesome opportunity is found on the back end, but it's completely ignored.

Tim Fitzpatrick
We spend so much time trying to acquire new clients. Why not maximize that opportunity? It's much less expensive to do more business with the people that you're already working with and to get referrals from those people. And that's really what you're focusing on with advocacy marketing. But it goes back to what you touched on in the beginning here, in order to do that effectively, you have to have the customer journey mapped out very well and understand all of the touch points on the back-end that you're taking advantage of. Frankly, the way most people look at the customer journey is a funnel, right? But when they look at it as a funnel, they're missing all of the advocacy elements that are on the back end of that.

Billy Robbins
Even going back to the funnel aspect, think about this, what an advocate does. When an advocate refers someone, you literally jump past awareness. Tim, you give me a referral. I already know who the person is, and my relationship with you, me trusting you is automatically I'm going to adopt that trust. I'm like, Well, if Tim recommend him, that must be good. When you get on that phone call, all of a sudden, you've leapfrogged through all of the awkwardness that you have with a net new lead that you're trying to pitch. So the sales process is shorter. If they trust you already more, they're going to buy more of your products, they're going to buy more of your stuff upfront. So the sales process is even easier. It perpetuates everything. I tell you, I do a lot of coaching, too. I do a lot of just CEO coaching. I don't want to say life coaching. I don't know. But, dude, entrepreneurship is hard. You're up there, you're by yourself, you're solo. I talk to a group of guys pretty regularly, and we talk about things like, why did you start your business? When you first started your business? What was the grand, glorious call that you had? What lifestyle did you want? I know for me, I make that stuff front and center. I wanted a business where I could be at every single one of my kids' practices. I wanted to be soccer coach. I wanted to be this. I wanted to be that. I wanted to give opportunity. We start a business with all these big ideas of lifestyle and meaning and life and impact. Those are the core things that actually drive us. Then all of a sudden, you're like, How do I make payroll? I'm working 60 hours a week. All of a sudden, you own this job that controls you, and you're stuck into this thing. Let me ask you a question. Would you rather have the same amount of revenue but have half the customers? Would that be a better lifestyle business? Yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, absolutely.

Billy Robbins
Right. So instead, what happens is you're trying to grow revenue, meet all these things, but you're doing it by all this new client acquisition. Then you're operating out of fear and doubts. You're getting smaller clients, maybe that aren't a best fit. And it all starts to build and all add up. And all of a sudden, this thing is out of control, and you got to go a million miles an hour just to hold it all together. But literally, if there were more advocates in your business, you can make more money. But even if it was the same amount of money and you had half the clients, better relationships, better connectivity, better trust, the ease on your business would be so much more. And isn't that valuable? What's the value of that? How do you place a numeric value on peace of mind, on being able to be with your family and spend time with your kids and do the stuff that you want to do and actually go on the vacation, go for two weeks somewhere and not care about what you're leaving behind. Those types of things are actually what creates... That's the juice of life. That's the value of life. And that's not a marketing thing, but it should be impacting the types of marketing and the decisions that we make. And advocacy marketing is that thing that just it helps facilitate all of those types of things. Healthier business, more reliable, more peace, more joy, more impact. And again, it's just something that's ignored because we just go run right back to Facebook and Instagram and LinkedIn, direct messages. Would you want to be my client? Let's go. Let's call. And again, I'm not against those things to get going somewhat, but we're missing a major component if we're not focusing on the post-purchase stuff.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I want to pull something out that you said because honestly, it doesn't... I mean, we can tie it back to marketing, but you said what you wanted out of your business was front and center. One, awesome. We have to know what we want out of our business. Otherwise, we end up building a business that doesn't serve us. There's a lot of business owners that really know what they want. If we don't know what we want, we got to take a step back, identify that. Because once we know what we want, that serves as a guidepost. It serves as a checklist where we can go, Is doing this actually going to get me what I want? Yes, no. It helps you make great decisions. So thank you for sharing that.

How to Do Advocacy Marketing

Tim Fitzpatrick

I want to pull this back a little bit to the advocacy marketing side of it because if this is jiving with people, which I certainly hope it is, because again, look, any marketer will tell you you're far better off maximizing the existing clients that you already have. And you guys really have this system dialed in. If I want to get more involved in advocacy marketing for my business, what do I need to do? What are those steps?

Billy Robbins
Yeah, I mean, there's lots of things you can do. I was going to mention this a minute ago. One of the things is if you're not actually committed to taking care of your customers, don't even try. Because there are some businesses I alluded to them a little bit ago. But if you don't deliver the goods, then don't even attempt it. You've got to get your operations in place. You've got to get your product delivery. You got to get customer support. You got to get those things in place because you actually have to serve them. You actually have to take care of the problems because all the right emails at the right time aren't going to matter at all if people are just totally dissatisfied with working with. So any marketing aspect is really just packaging up who you are and the story that you have and delivering at the right time. So you got to be committed to great customer experience first. Number two, spend time with your customers. What makes them tick? What is their buying motivation? I just mentioned a moment ago about how you think about the passion of why you started your business and all those things. I'm going to tell you what, if you're in contact with the C-suite with the founder, the owner of the companies that you get to serve, you ask those questions. What is their purpose? What do they want to do? A business is a vehicle for underlying goals and desires that they have. And the more that you can understand those goals, the more that you can serve those people. And so get time to know people. It's like part of our system is things like surveys and things at the right time to get that information. But before you even have, let's say, an advocacy system, who are your 10 best customers? If you can, take them out to lunch. If you can, get on the phone with them, do something with them, get to know them, ask them what makes them tick, figure out what makes them uniquely then, because you might not even be aware of why are this group so attracted to us? Maybe there's part of your messaging or the delivery of who you are that just really separated you. You're like, Oh, wow, I didn't even realize how much of an element that was. Now you get to maximize it. You got to know the people you're serving. You got to know what they I want. I'll tell you, there's one of my favorite marketing books, which I don't even know if it's really a marketing book, but I'll tell you, there's a book called Wired to Care by Dev Patnaik, and it's all on empathy. It's all on empathy. And he's like a product development guy. He's going to product development thing, and they talk about how they design products for people. But the book is literally all about empathy. And I'll tell you, man, there's something that goes when you can develop the skill of empathy. And again, that's the essence of customer journey. The essence of customer journey is because I think businesses look at things from my perspective. How do I get more of the people I want to my landing page? How do I get more of them to give me their email address? How do I get more of them to buy my product? And say, oh, stop. Who are you serving? What are they looking for? What are the needs that they have? Because really great marketing is actually just serving their needs intellectually in a way that puts you as the authority, the thought leader, the expert that they're attracted to come and talk to. And that's a much better conversation to have than being like, Oh, I was number one on Google Maps. Sure, local SEO, it's good. Let's be number one. But there's something more, I'm more attracted to who you are. That's why be very you. That's something I'm definitely, all my stuff, I'm really upfront about my family, my faith, my this and that. It's just who I am, and I attract certain people who want to be around a person like that. That's better because, again, you're just doing relationships with people that you like better. So get to know people, get to do things, and think about, how can I continue to serve my clients after the purchase in a way that makes their experience a lot better? I'll give you just one example of one of the components. We have eight major pillars in what we call our advocacy machine. The second one is called value add resources. I always use this as a technology thing. I bought the new iPhone, iPhone 15. It's like 1,500 bucks. It keeps getting more and more expensive. You know what I mean? I always make a joke I'm like, The value of this phone is actually dependent on the individual. How valuable this phone is is based on my ability to extract the value out of it. So just because you provide amazing value, It doesn't actually mean that people are getting it. If I decided to use this as a coaster, that's a pretty horrible use of 1,500 bucks. If all I know to do is make a phone call and send an email, still not that great. My ability to actually love this product is based on my ability to know all of the features, how it works, and it tracks it out. If you guys are implementing phone systems, which most do, why not send videos immediately after install, showing them how to use the seven most important features? You already bought them or anything, but all of a sudden, their whole team, everyone's going to align, has this quick little thing they can reference. They're going to like it better. They're going to enjoy it more. They're going to have less questions. It's going to be less impact on your customer support, less complaints back to the IT guy. All of it just adds to this like, wow, I was able to extract more value out of it.tEven post-purchase marketing is really just about a continual serving and understanding how can I continue to add value. Really, that's all an upsell is. Educate. You got cybersecurity stuff? Educate. Talk about the threats, educate on them, talk about the vulnerabilities, and then make yourself available. I'm here to talk if you want to solve that problem. That aspect and idea of just continual service is a great way to do it. Now, a little personal plug, if you go to our website, inteccompany.com, we have a resource tab. Under there, we've got a bunch of free tools. We've got all kinds of free stuff, customer journey stuff, advocacy stuff, all the things we're talking about. That's our way. We want to serve. I figure if I tell a story, build authority, the right people will come to us.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it. I heard you say two steps to getting started with advocacy marketing. The first one, super critical. If you're not already delivering an amazing experience and getting results, you got to get that fixed before you invest in advocacy marketing. Once you've got that dialed in, then we need to go back to what you initially talked about, which I focus on this as well. Everything from a marketing standpoint starts with your target market and your ideal clients within that market. We've got to identify who our ideal clients are, and then we need to take the time to really understand them. Talk to them, interview them, survey them. What was the buying journey like? What are their goals, their aspirations? Why do they buy from you? Why did they continue to work from you? All of that information lays the groundwork for you to really understand them. And once you do that, then you can start to put some of the necessary tools, tactics in place to build this advocacy machine.

Billy Robbins
Yeah, I agree with that. A good business that's committed to this should actually say no to certain leads. And that might be on thinking for some businesses being like, Wait, somebody wants to pay you money and you're going to say no. It's like you got to know your best customers so much that you're like, we're just not a great fit. I had to say that to somebody yesterday. We were talking like, Could I have sold them something? Probably. But it sounds like you're just not the right customer for what we have, not the right fit, appreciate having time to talk. Bless you. You should do that. Most businesses probably need to fire 10% their clients.

Tim Fitzpatrick
When you say no to somebody that's not a good fit, you're serving them, you're doing yourself a favor, you're doing your team a favor because nobody's going to be happy long term. To me, when people make those decisions, it's all about making a quick buck than it is for really the long term benefit of anybody involved. But unless you've identified who your ideal clients are, you can even determine whether somebody's a good fit or not.

Billy Robbins
Exactly. Yeah.

Conclusion

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it, man. Awesome stuff. Any last minute thoughts or guidance you want to share with us, Billy?

Billy Robbins
Really, again, I just think that this type of marketing, this idea, it's really an overflow of what's happening internally. As the leader, as the CEO, as the organization, whatever you're in, continue to feed and develop and grow who you are and your ability to serve people and your ability to solve problems. The more you grow an organization, it's actually more like the relational aspect. It's funny. I get more and more disconnected from my business. Things that I used to do 100% of the time five years ago, I don't even have to do it anymore. I'm like, I don't know. I got a team for that. Really founder-led sales, founder-led communications, that's where you got to get to. You got to be in front of your customers, talking to them, figuring out ways that you can serve them and bless them better. But if you have that heart where you're like, I am here to serve you as the people I'm called to serve, solve the problems that you have, you're going to come up with so many creative ideas. And then all of a sudden, like we said, opening, you're going to use that as a framework. When this new TikTok strategy or the thing happens or this happens, you're like, Wait a minute. Is this a tool in my hand that I get to use to better serve the people I'm called to serve or to solve the problems that they solve? And if the answer is no, that's just not for you. And you adopt the things that are resonating with that. And so, yeah, just take care of people. It's really, I think that's simple.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You already mentioned it. If people want to connect with you, intentcompany.com. Once they're on the site, they can go to your resources. You have all kinds of stuff there. So please, I would encourage you, if you've enjoyed this conversation that I've had with Billy, he obviously knows what the hell he's talking about. If you want, if this whole concept of advocacy marketing is really resonating with you, head over there, connect with them. Billy, thank you for taking the time, man. I appreciate it. Those of you that are watching, listening, I appreciate you as well. If you want to connect with us, you can do that over at rialtomarketing.com. The other resource we always have is over at revenueroadblockscorecard.com. If you want to identify you can do that over there. So take advantage of it. Again, thank you, Billy.

Billy Robbins
Thank you. I appreciate that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Thank you, audience, for watching. Yeah, absolutely. Until next time. Take care.


Connect with Billy Robbins


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

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