What To Do When You Are Stuck In Business

What To Do When You Are Stuck In Business

No matter how great you are, we all get stuck in our businesses. Jon Dwoskin from Jon Dwoskin Experience is going to walk us through what to do when you get stuck so you can push through your roadblocks.

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What To Do When You Are Stuck In Business



Tim Fitzpatrick
I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. I am really excited to have with me Jon Dwoskin from the Jon Dwoskin experience. Jon, welcome. Thanks for being here, man.

Jon Dwoskin
Thanks, Tim. I appreciate you having me. Appreciate it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, absolutely. You know, I was on your podcast, I don't know, a month or two ago, so it's nice to switch sides of the mic this time.

Jon Dwoskin
Yeah. Yeah. It's fun to see the other side of Streamyard looks like because you usually when I'm on podcast or recorded, they're in Zoom and this and the other. So yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, yeah. So for those that don't know what Streamyard is Streamyard is the streaming software that we're using to stream live. If you have ever thought of streaming live, go check out. You owe it to yourself to put it in the Streamyard. It is fantastic. It is so easy to use. So yeah. Yeah, I'm not I'm not used to seeing the other side of it either. So it is cool. Now look, we people get stuck in business all the time, so I am super excited to kind of work through this process and give people some tips on how to get through it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Before we do that, I always start with just asking some kind of rapid-fire question to help us get to know you. So you ready to jump into this?

Jon Dwoskin
Sure. Let's do it!

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK, let's do it then. So when you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Jon Dwoskin
With my family, my wife, my two kids, my friends playing tennis, playing golf.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Now, what's your hidden talent?

Jon Dwoskin
I play piano. Nobody really knows I play piano, but I've played since I was seven. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Dang Ah. So you've been playing since you're seven, you're kind of you're Mozart ish now.

Jon Dwoskin
I'm not even really that close.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, well, it's so enough to know where it's kind of a party trick you can start playing.

Jon Dwoskin
I most people even know. I mean I play and I don't you know but I enjoy it and but yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
OK. Is it relaxing?

Jon Dwoskin
It's so relaxing. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I could imagine that. What's the best piece of advice that you've been given?

Jon Dwoskin
You know, my parents used to tell me two different things has just come to mind. One is you can learn from everybody, whether they're older or younger. So never discount anything. Just always be in a learning mode, which I always think was so important. And then the next was, don't ever be jealous. Jealousy will kill you, It's just, you know, just be happy for other people and don't be jealous. And I think it was very simple, but great advice. Be open for learning and be happy for other people.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You know that reminds me of, don't be jealous reminds me of a quote that I heard from Steph Curry and he said his dad always told him, "Don't count other people's money." And I thought that was such a great quote because so many people it's so easy to fall into that trap. But damn, if you're counting other people's money, you're never going to be happy.

Jon Dwoskin
Probably by Steph Curry is, you know, that foundation. That's kind of how he plays on the court, right? He's just effortless the way it's. Yeah, it's amazing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So what's one thing about you that surprises people?

Jon Dwoskin
You know, this is kind of funny, but so I live in Detroit, you know, the suburbs of Detroit. And I went to Eastern Michigan University and it was a great school. I got a great education. I double-majored in journalism and economics. But people I'll be in meetings and people just assume I went to University of Michigan. So I always laugh with my wife who went to U of M and my kids because people say to me, people will be talking, I'll be at a meeting.

Jon Dwoskin
They'll say, you know, like at Michigan, like when we when you were there as like, well, "I didn't go to Michigan" and they'll say, well, "Where did you go?" And I say, and I tell them, "I went to eastern Michigan" and they say, "You did?" You know, but it's always like a surprise. I go to Michigan. I always think it's hilarious, though. And when I tell them I went to Easter and they're like surprised that I went to Easter.

Jon Dwoskin
So I don't know. People think I'm smarter than I am.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So I guess you should take it as a compliment that they went to Michigan?

Jon Dwoskin
I guess so, yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's a good one. I like that. What does success mean to you?

Jon Dwoskin
You know, it's changed so much over the years. I'm going to be forty-nine on Saturday and so success at this stage of my life is so much different than it was when I graduated college. Twenty-three years old. But to me, success is about fulfillment. Period. You know, I have a business, my end game was always to create the business that I have right now, which is my business coaching business and speaking and things of that nature.

Jon Dwoskin
We can get into more details later. But success minus fulfillment equals failure or success. Without success, without fulfillment equals failure is one of my favorite Tony Robbins quotes. And I really believe that success is about just being fulfilled and everybody works so hard. And, you know, there are people who are listening to this who are saying, "I'm in that space" and there are people, I think, who will listen to this and say, "I'm not in that space", but I can see that space doesn't even exist or are so far away.

Jon Dwoskin
But I think you need to wherever you are, you have to build to that place. And whether it takes a day, a week, a year, or even multiple years, you can get there. It just may take some time.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. You know, a thing I love about that, too, though, is you can get fulfillment on the journey, not just the destination.

Jon Dwoskin
Absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Which is why I love that that thought process on that

Jon Dwoskin
You shift your mindfulness a little bit and you change the narrative and you can find these valleys of fulfillment that maybe you didn't see before. And looking at things with new lenses in perspective, again, can add such fulfillment. I think, you know, many people say we're in still the pandemic and many say we're in an endemic.

Jon Dwoskin
But I think Covid this last year and a half has really kind of put things in perspective to find areas of fulfillment, gratitude, and appreciation where maybe many of us haven't had it in the past. I know I have a much deeper level of all of those things as we fast forward from March of two 20.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I love it. So where's your happy place?

Jon Dwoskin
In my house. I love being in my house. You know, it's and I love being in my house. I love being with my wife and my kids and my dogs. I'm very content and happy at home. I'm you know, I think also that's, as you say, what surprised me people. I'm much more of an introvert than people think I am. People think I'm much more extroverted than I am, but I'm kind of a homebody and I like being home.

Jon Dwoskin
And I mean, I like being out with friends and out and about and talking to people and hanging out with my buddies. And but I like being home. I like being so, so locked down for me was not a stressful as I mean of course there was stress elements of it because of the world and things of that nature. But, but being in a house and not being able to leave with my wife and my kids and my dogs, it was great.

Tim Fitzpatrick
We have more similarities than I thought. My wife said through this whole pandemic's, she's like, "Gosh, you're a lot more of an introvert than I am. Then I realized I always knew you were a little bit more introverted." But , it's like, man, OK, I'm sure I've been totally content. I got plenty of things to do.

Jon Dwoskin
All right. I'm content. I'm very I mean where you're looking at me, I've been here for fifteen months like this, so I kind of do want an office. I'm going to I'm trying to find an office where I can rent an empty office in somebody's office. Because I would like a place if I want to get out of this, just like this room I'm in right now is, is very small and compact. And I don't you know, if you look at the last year and a half of stuff, I've done my podcast, my tips, my this everything is in this spot wearing a black t-shirt.

Jon Dwoskin
So I would like to get out a little bit, but overall, much more of an introvert. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What about qualities? What kind of qualities do you value in the people with whom you spend time?

Jon Dwoskin
Yeah, just kindness I think is kind of sums it up. I mean I, you know, I like a good edge of somebody and personality. I like to laugh and have fun and personality. But, you know, just, you know, fun, you know, laugh, you know, you can laugh, but at their core kind. Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that this will be a whole different place if most people approach it from the thought process of being kind all the time. So let's learn let's talk a little bit about what you're doing now with your coaching business and just anything that you want to share about your past experience and who you're working with and how you're helping them today.

Jon Dwoskin
Yeah. So I don't tell anybody who I work with. I don't share my client roster. And I think if I did, I actually would probably get even more clients because I work with solopreneurs, Fortune 100 companies, and everything in between. But everything I do, clients share so much confidential information with me. I've always had the philosophy. I just don't repeat any of it to anybody. And I think that's really important. But what I do with these individuals, with these companies.

Jon Dwoskin
Is keep them consistent in their execution, right? Work with them on leadership skills. It's interesting, so many people are successful and stuck and stuck in multiple one or multiple lanes. I think one of the things I do is, I help people simplify things. I help people bring out ideas of things. I help people take the complicated and the complex and younger it down to a kindergartner to a second-grade level so they can then productize it and then sell it internally and sell it, sell their products externally, teaching people how to productize themselves, teaching people how to look at their organization more as an operational system, teaching people how to manage people.

Jon Dwoskin
Most people you know, most companies promote managers because they were good at their job and then don't train them or even know if they're good at managing people. And most of the time they're not. And so training these people is really, really important. Creating business plans, reverse engineering those plans, and providing tools and best practices and what can be implemented into their business immediately. My coaching, I look at myself as a month-to-month investment guarantee value add. You pay me twenty, I give you a hundred.

Jon Dwoskin
Right. I'm, I'm more than that. But that's just kind of an analogy as far as the mindset. I don't do any contracts with my clients because I guarantee my value. And every and the trick with coaching is consistency. Right. You know, somebody call me and do two hours of coaching because they're stuck and they don't want to do any more coaching. I'll do that. But eighty eighty five percent of my clients come in.

Jon Dwoskin
We do a deep dove and then we do 15 to 30 minutes a week. If they need more time, we add more time. But it's about what's the plan this week? What do you need to do this week? What do we have to plan out, map out? What do we need to really strategize on? And we get a ton done. And the key is consistency. Absolutely consistency. And I think that's what people are. People stop because it's a.

Jon Dwoskin
Coaching is a lot of work right? It's 15 to 30, sometimes an hour a week. But then they're working 40, 50, 60, 70 hours on top of that. Now, I guarantee you, my accessability, I return every call takes the same day, but they have got they have to do the work. And I can point one or two clients that coach with me, but then they want to do the work. So they say, "Well, I don't it's not really working as fast as I thought."

Jon Dwoskin
Well, well, yeah. Because I would say, "You have to actually do the work. You have to take the stuff. We talk about it actually work and doing ten hours a week isn't going to cut it", you know, so you have to be ready to jump in and stretch yourself and be really ready to grow.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So let's talk about getting stuck. Kind of led into this in the beginning. We all get stuck in some way, shape, or form. Your client. You're helping them get unstuck and push through those. Why do people and companies get stuck and how can you help them get unstuck?

Jon Dwoskin
Yeah, well, one thing is, is they overcomplicate things. You know, I think business is through my lens. Business is pretty simple and people make it really complicated. And I when I'm going into a company, I see things and can reverse engineer things intuitively and instinctively. Down to the simple and so I go into a boardroom and everybody's in the boardroom and they're talking about this and how and it's like they're spending 10, 15 minutes talking about something that could be summed up in under two minutes with much easier clarity.

Jon Dwoskin
And so I coach a lot of those people. I coached a lot of people just to even prep for major corporate meetings because they're going in and they don't even know how to articulate what they do, right? What they do, they don't know how to do it succinctly, tightly, where it has impact.

Jon Dwoskin
And it has clarity. And so working with people on communication and leadership skills, there's so much art and science when it comes to if you're the person who's running the meeting, the agenda to the meeting, how you roll out the pre meeting, how you roll out to get people prepped for that meeting, how you get people the agenda, how to have an effective meeting, how to what to do after the meeting, certain things to run and do at a meeting.

Jon Dwoskin
There's all of these elements of just interacting with human beings and making things just simpler, whether it's the CEO, the owner of a company, the and how they lead and articulate their message, whether it's a manager managing people, understanding the importance of one on ones and how to bring the best out of every single person and get them to their potential, whether it is a salesperson who ironically doesn't really know how to sell or is afraid to ask for business, these are ways that people get stuck.

Jon Dwoskin
These are the people that I coach to work with salespeople to basically teach them how to ask for business and then role play and set a plan of action and how to market and brand themselves managers, how to get the most out of their people, provide them tools and best practices where they can do that, and CEOs and leadership teams to really how to run an effective company and lead people and build a culture that is always evolving.

Jon Dwoskin
And one of the things I think people get wrong with why they get stuck is a leader should be talking about the vision of their business every single day, and that should trickle down to the managers and them talking about the vision, because everybody needs to feel connected to the vision of a business, as though sometimes people don't know how to do that or why they need to do that.

Jon Dwoskin
But the people working at a company need to feel connected to the vision and then how their work connects to that vision and why they matter. And then if your people are not feeling like they matter or understanding how they're connecting to the bigger vision, then they're just not going to give their hundred percent, they'll give their two percent that looks like one hundred percent. And then everybody just starts to kind of get a little stuck.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Do you think, does the vision help them if they're buying into the vision, does the vision help everybody on the team find meaning in what they do?

Jon Dwoskin
Well, yeah. I mean, think about it like this. You know, if you ever put together a puzzle. Right. So, you know, one of the things I do with clients is I'll break people into groups when I'm doing some group training and I'll give them the pieces of a puzzle, but I don't give them the cover. Right? And so it takes them a long time to figure it out, so then I make them pull it apart and then I give them the cover and they do it again and they do it really quickly.

Jon Dwoskin
And so it showcases an example of if you're not putting the vision in front of people, they'll create their own and it will take 10 times as long. And if you just look at time, right, if you save somebody four minutes a day, that's twenty-four hours a year just to kind of quantify that. So letting your people define the vision, and then and the amount of time it's going to take them to figure things out and you're not sharing with them what that is and how to do it and training them up.

Jon Dwoskin
You're going to get stuck because all of a sudden you have a company of, let's just say one hundred people and you have one hundred definitions of what the vision is, because the leader hasn't articulated the message and the vision effectively. So how can people not get stuck in that? It's like a highway with one hundred different cars going all different speeds in all different kind of directions.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So the vision acts like the cover to the puzzle. It helps guide you in what you need to do to get there.

Jon Dwoskin
Correct.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that analogy. That's a great analogy. So a lot if I'm hearing you correctly, a lot of companies get stuck because of complexity and lack of vision.

Jon Dwoskin
Correct.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. One of the quotes that always stuck with me about complexity is that complexity is the enemy of results. When we complicate things, it is so much easier for those things to fail. And when they fail and they're complex, it becomes that much harder to really dig in and hone in on where the breakdown is occurring. but when we keep things simple, man, they just operate more efficiently. If we run into issues, it's much easier to identify and we got to break down here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's not easy to make things simple, which is why most people overcomplicate things. It's so easy to overcomplicate it.

Jon Dwoskin
I think a lot of times people want to sound like the smartest person in the room because they want to just do that. And so when you're and then I, I've worked with companies. I continue to work with companies that merge with other companies. And, you know, you go to this meeting where everybody's kind of like, you know, even energetically, kind of like pounding their chest, in a way, where it's kind of like and the way I see, I see and hear things that people aren't paying attention to.

Jon Dwoskin
And so and it's interesting because sometimes you can't come out and say, "This is what I'm seeing and this is what's really going on." Sometimes it takes a three to eight-hour meeting to bring everybody else along the journey so they can then say, "Oh, this is what we see." But I can see it sometimes within the first couple of minutes. But I can't tell the client that because I have to take them on a path so they can raise their level of awareness and see it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. So you start working with somebody. You realize that they're stuck because of complexity or a vision issue. I'm assuming that next step in some way, shape, or form is some type of plan. How do we let's talk about the importance of of a plan and why we need to have one in place.

Jon Dwoskin
Sure. Well, a plan, an action plan is absolutely critical. Right. So, you know, to me, I look at myself as a guide to help people.

Jon Dwoskin
I'm there to be of service and to guide them with my expertise into the next level of where their business is going. And as I create a plan for them and then create an action plan for them, we define what success looks like and we define what failure looks like. And then we reverse engineer the plan from there. And then everybody understands what the plan is with very critical, specific, and measurable goals of what needs to be done.

Jon Dwoskin
And then rolling out, OK, this person needs to do this is doing this. This person is doing this. This person is doing this. Agains simple, right? And then you have part of the action plan is, OK, what's our in some cases daily or weekly check-in to make sure that everything is getting done, everything needs one owner, everything needs a deadline, everything needs a next step. Most people where they get also stuck and lost is they don't have deadlines and we don't know who owns a project.

Jon Dwoskin
And so everything needs a deadline, an owner and a next step if it's going to accelerate down the path to be ultimately completed.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Is there a framework that you use consistently from a plan standpoint, or does it vary depending on what you're working with the client on?

Jon Dwoskin
It varies. It varies. But the, I hate using the word template, but the formula is the same. Right. What's the project? Right. What does somebody need to do? What's the next step? Who the owner? What's the deadline? Right. And you just have and what are any issues that are going to get in the way? How do we overcome those issues. Right. Who's the co-owner?

Jon Dwoskin
That is going to be somebody that you can reach out to and you just kind of create it. You can create it in an Excel sheet and then you just keep it ongoing. "OK, we're going to meet every Monday and we're going to meet every Friday at eight a.m. for twenty minutes to go over this. And everybody's got to come prepared."

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. I you know, from a marketing standpoint, it our view is that it's all about the plan. You've got to have a plan and the way it was explained to me, and it always stuck with me was when you plan, it outlines your priorities.

Jon Dwoskin
Correct.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And when you have priorities, you have clarity. And when we have clarity that reduces stress because we know exactly what we need to do, which I think is so, so important.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So, yeah, I mean, execution with a poor plan is better than no plan at all. So you know. And the other I. Have you ever read the book The Slight Edge from Jeff Olsen?

Jon Dwoskin
No, it sounds great, though.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's a really good book. It just talks about like the small habits that really lead to exponential either growth or a downward spiral. But one of the things he talks about in there from a planning standpoint is the plan you start with isn't the plan you're going to end with. You know, so it's just your plan just helps get you moving and taking action and knowing where you need to focus right now. But the plan will evolve. So forget about trying to create a perfect plan that doesn't exist.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Just put one together and start moving.

Jon Dwoskin
Well, the plan will evolve itself. Every action. I think the key is really deadlines, right? This. And what's the deadline?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome stuff. So I don't think we can have a conversation about, you know, companies without talking about culture. Culture, I think is critical to the success of any business. How do you grow a culture of just thinking big and what does thinking big mean?

Jon Dwoskin
Sure. Well, let's start with that. What does thinking big mean. Thinking big is doing small things every day that get you to your big. Period. Right? So if you want to think big, you've got to do the small things every day that get you and compound to your big whether that's your goal, whether that's your purpose, whatever, whatever that is. But when you talk about culture, I think people don't understand leaders don't understand the amount of power that they have in a culture.

Jon Dwoskin
Ninety five percent of everything that they do say how they walk, how they, you know, if they roll their eyes, or whatever they do affects the culture. That is the bar of the culture. And sometimes people don't want to they act surprised by it. But it's sometimes what I'll say to him is like, "Stop pretending you're confused. Like you run this company. You're a leader. When you scream at someone, you change the culture within it", you know what I mean?

Jon Dwoskin
If you're going to walk if you're going to live in your office with your back and I think this is starting to come back now. But if you're going to not be accessible, not be approachable, have a closed-door, your lights always off, and if you're going to be that person and you're the leader and the owner, that's your culture. You may have a subculture that wants to live in a different more of a fun environment, but the culture is what the leader sets the tone to. Period. The end.

Jon Dwoskin
Whether a leader wants to accept that or not. I mean, that's his or her choice. But that's the culture. The problem the obstacle is, is you the bigger the company gets is when you have managers that are the wrong managers that manage a ton of people, they create subcultures.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes.

Jon Dwoskin
Those are either consistent with the culture of the overall company. If they're the wrong type of manager and don't know how to manage people, that subculture becomes a very negative, unproductive, culturally kind of environment where most of the time people are just complaining.

Jon Dwoskin
And ad because and when you have an owner of a company or a C-level exec who's out of touch with that, a lot of times they let that just kind of happen and they're not. And that's a big problem. And once you have one manager, you know, one apple ruins the whole you know, that one drop of blood grows again. Once you have one manager who's leading people negatively, it spills over to the other groups and then you really begin to lose your culture.

Jon Dwoskin
So people are absolutely critical managers are some of the most important people you can have in an organization managing people to make them feel like they matter. I mean, everybody's important in an organization, but good managers are so important. So are good salespeople, because you've got to do sales. But overall, a leader has to take for an owner or C-level who's bleeding, has to take full accountability in the culture.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, so, I mean, really, as a leader, your actions, what you say everything is under a microscope and you realize that and will linger.

Jon Dwoskin
And it lingers, by the way, I companies where the owner of a company has not yelled at someone in two or three years but the culture is that that leader, that owner is a yeller and they're terrified of that person. And even if people had circulated out and there's still an X percentage of people at that company, that is still the walking on eggshells culture.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Jon Dwoskin
And so it's that's it's a really interesting thing. And so that owner will go either two ways. They will bring people on that are yellers underneath them or have that kind of tyrant behavior so they don't have to be that person or they will evolve the culture to something that's more in alignment with the soul of where they want their company to be. It's really an interesting thing to, I think, to watch within companies.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's yeah. So, you know, the other thing that where I think a lot of people go wrong with culture is in their hiring process. They just don't, you know. One of my mentors always described to me is you hire for cultural fit firstand firsthand skills later, right? Because, look, you can teach people skills, but if they don't buy into your culture, your vision, man, that's not going to change. So you've got to hire for cultural fit first and then hire for all the other stuff second, which goes down to, you know, again, I could be the leader and I'm walking the walk, but then I hire managers that aren't walking the walk and not just that's just going to screw everything up.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. John, you've dropped some serious value in this conversation. Are there any words of wisdom, parting thoughts you want to leave us with?

Jon Dwoskin
You know, I'll ask for one. I'll leave you with a couple that I see as issues for people. Ask for help, right? A lot of people, whether it's ownerr it doesn't matter. You know, you got to ask for help. And a lot of times people think that, you know, a lot of times people think that they can just do it themselves. And, you know, I'm a big fan of the same level of consciousness that got you to where you are is not going to get you to where you need to be as a coach.

Jon Dwoskin
I raise someone's frequency and vibration and consciousness. I raise their awareness, give them a picture of what's going on. And you need that outside perspective. Sometimes people telling you kind of like, "Hey, here's what I see." Right? Here's what I know. Here's what I see. Here's what I'm hearing after talking to people. And so if you don't like the way things are going, ask for help. Right. And I think that's one of the most important things, because the more us for help, the more your people will ask for help.

Jon Dwoskin
Culture is is absolutely No. One. Next, I would say make sure as you run a company that your people feel connected and that they matter. We're in an environment right now where jobs are coming back and recruiters are calling into a lot of companies and the people that aren't happy or don't feel connected or don't feel that as a company, you are working in alignment with the values that you that are on your wall. They're not going to stick around.

Jon Dwoskin
And I think it's also important to note that, you know, today the average I say millennial in a positive way, they stay at a job two, three, four years. And so sometimes people in older generations complain or worry about that. But to me, there's nothing to complain or worry about. You know, you bring somebody in, you understand what they want to do, how long they want to stay. And if you have the relationship with them or you say, "Hey, listen, I know you may want to leave in two or three or four years, the only thing I ask is give me six-month notice, help find your replacement, build the training guide and manual along the way through the months and years that you're here."

Jon Dwoskin
And so the transition just happens seamlessly. And so don't fight what is happening. Just dive into it and be smart about it, because those people may leave your company and end up being one of your best clients for bringing going to a company that is one of your best clients. And so just be open to where the world is going. Lastly, I'll say this. Every company must be thinking about how they are reinventing themselves. We are in a decade right now where by the year 20, 30 pre Covid studies, were saying that 80 are pointing to that.

Jon Dwoskin
Eighty five percent of the jobs that exist do not exist today. And so we are in a world where artificial intelligence, virtual reality, I mean, you know, self-driving cars and technology that hasn't even been invented yet, that's going to shape 2026 to 2030. And so every company has to get their systems and processes in place. If you want to grow a great company, you need great people. But you also have to constantly be forecasting and projecting where are we going to be in three years and how do we constantly reinvent ourselves and use e-Commerce as a platform to really elevate what we're doing today.

Jon Dwoskin
So those are just a couple thoughts that are kind of in my head as you ask the question.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. Jon, thank you so much for sharing this. If people who are watching, listening, if you're stuck and you need help, ask Jon for help. I know we can help you, Jon. Best place for them to find you.

Jon Dwoskin
Yeah, you can call my cell at two four eight five three five seven seven nine six or shoot me a text or go to Jon Dwoskin, J-O-N-D as in David W-O-S-K-I-N Jon Dwoskin dot com. I have over nine hundred episodes at a podcast, hundreds of blogs, hundreds of videotapes, tons of free content that's updated pretty much every day.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Fantastic. Thank you for those of you tuning in. Again, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing. If you want to gain clarity on where to focus your marketing right now, hop on over to our website, Rialto marketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O marketing dot com. Click on to get a free console button. I guarantee you will walk away knowing exactly where you need to focus right now to get the best return. Til next time, take care.

Jon Dwoskin
Thanks, man.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You bet.





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About the Author Tim Fitzpatrick

Tim Fitzpatrick is the President of Rialto Marketing. At Rialto Marketing, we help service businesses simplify marketing so they can grow with less stress. We do this by creating and implementing a plan to communicate the right message to the right people. Marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the RIGHT plan.

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