What To Do If You Only Have 20-Minutes A Day For Marketing

November

3

0 comments

If you want to be successful with marketing, you’ve got to be consistent over time. It’s a long term investment that can be very time consuming. What should you focus on if you only have a limited amount of time for marketing each day? Our special guest today Paul Green from MSP Marketing Edge is going to share his thoughts on this and a whole lot more. Check it out.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Paul Green for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

Watch This Episode


Listen To The Podcast

Subscribe To The Podcast

Apple Podcasts
Spotify
Google Podcast
Stitcher
iHeart Radio

Read The Transcript Here


Podcast Transcription

What To Do If You Only Have 20-Minutes A Day For Marketing

Tim Fitzpatrick
If you want to be successful with marketing, you've got to be consistent over time. It is a long-term investment that can be very time-consuming. So what should you do? What should you be focusing on if you only have a limited amount of time for marketing each and every day? Our special guest today is going to share his thoughts on this and a whole lot more. Stay tuned. I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe you must remove your revenue roadblocks to accelerate growth and marketing shouldn't be difficult. Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. I am super excited to have Paul Green from MSP Marketing Edge with me. Paul, welcome. Thanks for being here.

Paul Green
No, thank you very much for having me on, Tim.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yes, I'm excited. I know we tried to do this a while back. You had some computer problems. I am so glad we're able to do this today. Dude, I love your background. Is that real?

Paul Green
Oh, 100 % real. Yes. I've spent thousands of dollars on all these screens and things. This is my at-home green screen setup.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. Hey, my man, I love it. I wouldn't have known otherwise. That's why I asked. Before we jump into it, I want to ask if you rapid-fire questions help us get to know you. Are you ready to jump in with both feet here?

Paul Green
Let's do it. Let's do it. Okay.

Tim Fitzpatrick
When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Paul Green
With my 13-year-old daughter and our two hobbies are musical theater. We love Le Miserable and also escape rooms. We are the best escape room pair you'll ever meet.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Wow. Okay, escape rooms. I've done that once. It was super fun.

Paul Green
We've done 45 this year alone. We've done quite a lot.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, so you weren't joking. That is your thing. What's your hidden talent?

Paul Green
Escape rooms. I have to do it with my daughter, though. It turns out when I do it with other people, I'm not so good. But we can crack a 60-minute escape room in about 25 minutes, which is pretty cool.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Have you found that the more you do it, the better you get?

Paul Green
Yeah. So you spot patterns. I'm an emotional person more than a logical person, but all escape rooms have patterns, and you just got to think the designer, what's the designer doing here? Is it the escape room where you have to solve it A, B, C, D? Or can you do it all concurrently? We've learned to spot the patterns within minutes of what escape room it is. That's almost become the new challenge for us is what an escape room is this?

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Paul Green
Oh, my goodness. Probably to work on the business rather than in the business. I started my first business in 2005, and I did the same mistake everyone does, which is like, work 80-hour weeks. My unofficial mentor, who's now my best friend, said to me, You've got to spend more time working on the business and less time working in the business. He's absolutely right. That's great advice.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, we got to get off the treadmill. Now, right?

Paul Green
Yeah.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What's one thing about you that surprises people?

Paul Green
You may not know what this is, but I am the world's biggest Doctor Who geek. Have you heard of Doctor Who, Tim? Do you know what that is?

Tim Fitzpatrick
I have, but I'm not… You need to… Yeah, fill me in.

Paul Green
Okay. It's the longest running sci-fi program in the world. It's a British TV show about a time traveler who's an alien with two hearts who gets into his blue police box and goes traveling around the world. It's the 60th anniversary in a couple of weeks' time. In fact, on Disney+ in a couple of weeks' time, all of Doctor Who from 1963 up until today is going to be available because they've done a licensing deal, and it's just huge. I could talk about Doctors, and they were there for 10 hours non-stop.

Tim Fitzpatrick
60th anniversary, are they still producing new episodes?

Paul Green
Oh, yeah. It took a break in 1989, and then it came back in 2005, but it's the same program, so it's the same continuity. They've got 60 years of continuity. It's insane. It's an insane show.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's got to be the longest-running television show of all time.

Paul Green
I think it is, yeah. I don't know about all time, but it's certainly the longest-running sci-fi show with the same continuity. They never rebooted it. They just refreshed it. In fact, the whole thing is the main character regenerates. He turns into a different actor every three or four years, and that's what's kept it going over the years. The same character, different actors. Really clever.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Well, I think of… I'm not a huge fan of it, but The Simpsons has been running for years in the US. I don't know how long, but it's been a very long time.

Paul Green
1988, I think it started The Simpsons.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, yeah, but it's not 60 years.

Paul Green
No.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's so but with that, it's cartoons. You don't have to worry about how the characters look all that much in real life. Dude, that's fascinating. Okay, Doctor Who? Hey, I learned something new today, man. That's one of my goals every day, so you helped me accomplish that. What does success mean to you?

Paul Green
Success is having time and money, and it's enough time to do the things you want to do and enough money to do the things you want to do. I'm a sole parent. There's just me and my 13-year-old in the house, and I love what I'm doing. I love doing things like this with you. But success for me is sitting down, having a meal with her, going to the theater with her. She's 13, so there's a limit, right? Because obviously I'm the bad guy as well as the good guy. But yes, success is about time. But time without money is horrible. Money without time is horrible. I think the most successful people I know are those who've got just enough time and just enough money to do exactly what they want to do.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's a great definition, man. Where's your happy place?

Paul Green
There's a place in the UK called Devon, which is the nice seaside. It's where British people go. It's where British people used to go for the holidays before planes came along in the 60s. I love it in Devon. I will retire there. It's just by the sea. It's quaint, it's old. It's what you'd expect old England to be by the seaside. I do just love it down there. I think that's going to be my future happy place. But for now, it's just home. I love being at home. I love being with my daughter. It's good.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Paul Green
I think the number one quality is loyalty. I was thinking about this and I've got ten people that work with me in my business and eight of them are people I've worked with before in previous jobs, one of them like 25 years ago. The fact that they're willing to come and work with me again, that makes me proud because it shows that they're loyal to me and I'm loyal to them. I think about again, my friends, I've only got a few very close friends, but we've been very close friends for a very long time. I think loyalty above all else is important for me.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Tell us a little bit more about what you're doing with MSP Marketing Edge. And for those that... I've been interviewing a lot of MSPs on my podcast. But for those that don't know, MSP, managed service provider, they're IT consultants, right? What are you doing? How are you helping them?

Paul Green
Yeah, sure. Well, they're more than IT consultants. Their MSPs are the most wonderful people on the planet. And I don't just say that because they help me pay my mortgage. They really are. These are the IT support guys, the tech support guys. And what used to be just known as IT support is now called managed services because there's so much more to it. There's cybersecurity, there's telecoms, there's protecting you from yourself because quite often the clients get themselves into problems by not following best practice. What I do is I work with them on their marketing. Most MSPs, like most business owners, are not very good at marketing. They don't enjoy it. It's a distress activity for them. Whereas they find computers and technology easy and logical, they find marketing the dark art. I'm a marketing guy, I'm not a tech guy, but my superpower is making marketing easy for MSPs. Our service, the MSP Marketing Edge, we work with 700 MSPs all around the world. We're in about 15 different countries. What we do is we make a ton of marketing stuff for me and my team, and then we've arranged it into a series of systems. We help our MSPs set up marketing systems so that they can have marketing on a regular basis. The secret to good marketing, and this isn't just for MSPs, I've worked with all sorts of different business owners in different sectors, the secret to good marketing is not doing a bit of marketing now and again. It's not running a one-off campaign once or twice a year. It's about having a system. You're constantly and systematically creating audiences of people to talk to and then building a relationship with them. That's typically done through content marketing. The businesses that win, who get good at marketing and get good and better than their competitors at winning new clients, are the ones that put in place these systems. They can actually have less marketing impact than their competitors who do big marketing campaigns once or twice a year. But that consistency and doing it day in, day out, just little bits day in, day out, that's the thing that makes the difference.

Getting Good At Marketing

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, I totally agree. A lot of people think about marketing like a light switch. I can turn it on and off. That's not the case. I always think of it more like a flywheel. When you do it each and every day, you're feeding the flywheel, you're helping to build momentum. Once it gains momentum, hey, it's fantastic. You just need to continue to feed it. But if you stop feeding that wheel, it takes so much more effort to get it back to a place where it has momentum. Now, Paul, I know you used to be a radio presenter and a journalist. How did that help you get good at marketing?

Paul Green
Well, I think actually my entire life, all the things I did before I got into marketing at the age of 30, which is 19 years ago, that was... I'll just give my age away. Believe me, I'm feeling it today. The gray hair and everything.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Hey, man, you and me both, dude.

Paul Green
When I was 19 years old, I got my first job as a journalist. I was on a little weekly newspaper. This is pre-internet, so it was just such a blast. The day one of journalism school, they taught me how to look at things from someone else's point of view. I didn't realize that they taught me the most invaluable marketing lesson that day because that's one of the basic rules of marketing. You don't do things from your point of view. You look at it from the point of the view of the person that you're trying to influence. All everything in journalism, learning about deep interview techniques. There's me as a 19, 20-year-old interviewing 50, 60-year-olds about subjects I didn't understand. I learned how to get a quick understanding, how to form opinions about things, how to do deep questioning, how to then present that, how to edit things down. It's harder. If you see a 20-word story, that 20-word story takes 10 times longer to write than a 200-word story. It's insane. And all of these, you'll be listening to this, Tim, thinking, Well, these are all marketing skills. Then I went into radio and radio is about sitting in a little soundproof box on your own, having a conversation with 100,000 people. But the secret to good radio presenters is they're not talking to 100,000 people. They're talking to one person. You get it in your mind clear, this one person you're talking to. I was 23 when I got into radio and our target audience was 45-year-old mums. I was very immature as a 23-year-old guy. What did I know about 45-year-old mums? Nothing. I had to learn how to talk about things that she would find interesting because the advertisers wanted 45-year-old mums. That was why she was our target. Again, I learned how to do messaging that appeals to people, how to influence to people that aren't you. I learned how to have a one-on-one conversation. I got bored of radio after 10 years. I left, I think it was about 30, 31, started a marketing business, never done a marketing degree, never done any formal marketing training. I've read every marketing book I can get my hands on. I've done tons of training courses, but actually that core learning, I realized my entire media career was just teaching me about marketing. So if you want to get good at marketing, go and be a radio DJ.

PUSH THROUGH YOUR REVENUE ROADBLOCKS! 

Get the outside eyes and feedback you need to get on the right path with your marketing.

Gain clarity and understanding. You'll leave your discovery call knowing where to focus your marketing efforts right now to get the best return on your investment.

Why Are We So Bad with Marketing?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, there you go. It's so fascinating, too, because we can learn things in different industries and apply them to others, but it's easy for us to overlook that. But what you learn being a radio presenter and a journalist, they're fundamentals of marketing that just don't change. Those fundamentals are the same now as they were 50 years ago, and they're going to be the same 50 years from now. Yeah, completely. It's fantastic that you're able to take those fundamentals and apply them into what you're doing now. Which leads me to marketing is... I always say marketing shouldn't be difficult. It is for a lot of business owners. Why are MSPs? Frankly, let's just like you said, most business owners struggle with it. Why are we so bad with marketing?

Paul Green
I think it's because the people who start their own business, which it's you, Tim, it's me, we start a business to do the thing that we enjoy doing that we're good at, that we're passionate about. For MSPs, typically the career path is they've got into IT, they've gone and worked for someone else either on a help desk or as a consultant. They eventually have what you had, Tim, what I had, what Michael Gerber in his book, The Emith Revisited, calls the entrepreneurial seizure where you wake up one morning and you think, Do you know what? I want control. I want to do it my way. I want to do it this way. I want to earn a bit more money. I want control. Maybe it's because you're not happy where you are, maybe it's because you can just see something new. We all of us have some version of that entrepreneurial seizure. We go and start our own business and it's a business to do the thing we enjoy doing or that we have a passion for doing. The problem is that if you're a good tech person, technology person, or if you're a good dentist or you're a good printer or whatever it is that you do, marketing is not necessarily that skill set. You and I team are actually quite lucky. The thing that we were born with, the passion, so I think we're all born with that passion, we just have to spend our lives finding it. The passion we were born with was marketing. We're very lucky that the thing that we're passionate about doing, we actually quite enjoy doing for our own business. I've always said, never hire a marketer who hasn't got a successful business of their own. If you go and hire a marketing consultant and they're scraping around trying to find business, that's your red flag. That's your warning. Perhaps they're not the best person to hire. I think all business owners, they get going, they go out and they try to find some business. Pure passion and energy gets them through the first few years. They go networking, they win some clients. But you get to a point, and I think once you've hired two or three people, which, as we know, actually expands the amount of work you have to do. Your first couple of hires, they don't give you more time, they give you less time. And business owners get to that point three, four years in, they've got a couple of staff, they're just at that point where they haven't quite got enough to pay all the bills and take a good salary. They're working 80 hours a week. Their other half is complaining. Their kids are like, Who are you? I remember seeing you two weeks ago. That's the point they realized, Do you know what? I've got to get more new clients. To get more new clients, I've got to get good at marketing. But I honestly don't know where to start. And so often that's the starting point for an MSP that I start to work with. I'm sure, Tim, it's exactly the same for you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
When marketing is not your thing, it's really... It's challenging. It's hard. And what I see a lot of MSPs business owner doing is we immediately default to the tactics. And we put tactics ahead of strategy. And the way I look at it is strategy is fuel, tactics are the vehicles. So if we just pick the vehicles and we got no fuel, man, we're pushing those things down the road. I mean, it can work for a period of time, but it doesn't work long term. We got to have that fuel. The other thing, too, is you and I are about the same age, Paul. The first business I was involved in. They're like websites were informational brochures at that point. There are so many marketing channels now. It's just information overload for most business owners where it's just like, Oh, my God. I got to have Facebook. I got to be on TikTok. I got to have a podcast. I got to create content. I got a website and I got paid ads. And they just feel like they need to be everywhere. And the reality is we don't. We're far better off choosing fewer tactics and going deeper in those things. And what you help people do is put those systems in place so that we can consistently execute on it. What I also find is a lot of people choose the tactics, they start to do them, and then they stop. That's never going to work long term either, right?

Paul Green
No, exactly that. This business I've been running since 2016. I had a marketing company before which worked with healthcare sectors, so veterinarians, dentists, and optometrists, and I sold that and that was a great sale. We made some good money out of that and they gave me a five-year non-compete where I couldn't work in those sectors. That was when I discovered MSPs. Again, I feel like that entire 10-year business I felt was training for what I'm doing now. I will never leave. This is my final business. I will do this till I retire or die, whichever comes first. Let's hope you retire.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, let's hope.

Paul Green
What I've got today is I've got seven years of momentum. In our business, we call it Big Mo. I read this in a book somewhere and I can't remember the book, but Big Mo, Big momentum. For seven years, I've been writing a blog every single week for my website. We've got whatever is seven times 52, that's the number of blogs we've got on the website. For seven years, I've posted a piece of content in my Facebook group just for MSPs every day. I schedule it, so I don't physically do it every day, but every day there has been a piece of content. You can take that. Linkedin newsletters came out about 100 weeks ago, and I know this because I've just delivered today something like my 88th week in a row of a LinkedIn newsletter. It came out, took me a few weeks to go, That's a good idea. Let's do that. Now I've got a streak of 88 weeks. You will not break that. I can go on vacation and it'll still happen because I'll write it in advance and one of my team will post it, but I will not break an 88-week streak. I will not break a seven-year streak of doing it. The marketing that we do isn't particularly advanced. We don't spend huge amounts of money, and I mean, marketing our own business. We don't spend huge amounts of money on ads. We do a little bit of remarketing. But most of what we do is the same stuff consistently because we've got massive momentum. Even doing something like this. I will appear on any podcast, any webinar. Don't be offended. This is the choice to be here because it's momentum. It's a maximum of two a week and it's momentum and you just keep going. As you said earlier, the thing that frustrates me more than anything else in the world is the light switch on, off mentality and all business owners have it of, Oh, I'm getting too busy. I need to switch the marketing off. It's like, No, you have to think of the marketing is a giant. Do you know what it is? It's a paper pulping machine. If ever you get the chance, and about 25 years ago, I went around a paper factory where they literally take trees at one end and they output letter size paper at the other end. The process, it actually takes something like... I'm making this up now because it was so long ago, but it's something like a month. To turn wood into paper, all the processes and all the machine is like a month. If you switch the machine off and then you switch it back on again a week later, you have to wait a month for paper to start coming out the end. Certainly that's how it was 20 odd years ago. That's what marketing is. You can't switch your marketing on on a Monday morning and expect fantastic results by Monday afternoon. Well, you can. You throw money at it. You do Google ads, you do Facebook ads. But the efficacy of advertising, of pay-per-click advertising goes down year after year after year. Seo, search engine optimization gets harder year after year after year because, as you just said, Tim, there's so much noise. There's a million live streams happening right now, probably. There's a million new blogs have just gone up. There's a million new whatever, insert anything here. So marketing is getting harder and harder and harder. And the people who win are the people who do a set of strategic activities consistently for 20 years. Simple as that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah, it's a long-term game.

Paul Green
It is.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's a long-term game. I was just talking to a prospect this morning. They have spent 100 grand on marketing this year. It's not working. And they're worried about a recession. And so they're thinking about... They view it as an expense. And they're like, We're going to be going into a recession. We're going to cut it. I'm like, That's the worst thing that you can do. One, all of your competitors are thinking the exact same thing. Two, if you can see through this and continue to invest in it, you are going to be that much better positioned on the other end of it. But that's the reaction most people have. It's like it's an expense. It's a slight switch. I got to turn it off.

Paul Green
Let me tell you about there's a company in the UK called Specsavers. The US equivalent is Lenscrafters. It's like the National Optician. They are the dominant optician in the UK by a huge margin. They also are the dominant optician in Australia as well. They marched into Australia about 15 years ago and just decimated the marketplace.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Took it over?

Paul Green
Two things. Well, they have one big advantage and they do two things very well. The big advantage they have is they're still a private company, so they don't have shareholders. They're owned by the same couple that started it who now must be in their late 70s. Their kids now run it. So huge consistency. And there's two things they do very well. One of them is consistency in marketing. They have the same marketing today that they had in the '80s and the '90s. Their strapline in the UK is you should have gone to Specsavers. You'll have a TV advert and there'll be someone. In fact, the best one I remember is a vet that comes in and he's trying to find a pulse on a cat. It's not a cat, it's someone's fur coat or someone's like fur hat. The strapline comes up, You should have gone Specsavers. It's become a national thing. Anytime someone trips over something or obviously a football match, everyone's like, Oh, we should have gone Specsavers. But they've been doing that for 30 years. Of course, they have variations of it and they've modernized it. But for 30 years, they've got the same marketing. That's the first advantage. The second advantage is in a recession, they double their marketing spend, literally double it. Because they know exactly as you say, Tim, right? We are going to sacrifice profitability for two years, which we can do because we're a private company and our shareholders are not sitting there being greedy. We're not going to make any money for two years, but we're going to steal market share. That's what they did. There have been, I don't know what, five recessions in the time they've been going. As you say, there's a recession coming or we're in it or whatever, they will spend more. All of the other opticians will stop spending money and Specsavers will come out of that recession with a greater market share and their profits will be greater at the end than they were going in. That to me is one of the best marketing lessons of the whole world. It's insane.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It's so hard to have the discipline to do that. But it reminds me of, I think it was Warren Buffett that said you need to zig.

Paul Green
No, he's.

Doing Marketing in a Limited Amount of Time

Tim Fitzpatrick
The same. He's like, Be fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful. It's the same in marketing. When things start to go on a downturn and people are like, Whoa, that's when you need to put the gas on. Thank you for sharing that. That was a fantastic example. Let's chat about this as we wrap things up. Man, as a business owner, I only got so much time. Time is so valuable. I can't spend a little doing marketing. If I got a limited amount of time, what do I do? What do I focus on?

Paul Green
Sure. If you've only got 20 minutes a day for marketing, what you should do is invest all of that in to two activities in the place where your potential future clients are hanging out. If you are a B2B business, that's LinkedIn. If you are a consumer facing business, that's either Facebook or Instagram. Now, I don't know a huge amount about consumer based marketing, so I'm just going to focus on LinkedIn. But let's say you're a B2B business, every possible future client you could ever want to speak to is there in LinkedIn. Don't get me wrong, going and buying data or looking on other platforms, those are great things to do if you have more time. But if you only have 20 minutes, spend 20 minutes a day in LinkedIn doing these two things. Number one is you grow your audience, you grow your network. Now, LinkedIn has made this easy for you because a couple of years ago, the Microsoft who owned LinkedIn put some restrictions on it. Linkedin used to be a free-for-all. You could connect to hundreds of people a day, and you still can if you've got their expensive sales navigator. But actually, you don't need that. You can use the free basic LinkedIn membership and you can attempt to connect to up to 10 new people a day. But remember, we're doing this every day. You could do it seven days a week. There's potentially up to 70 people you're attempting to connect to every week. Now, only a couple of those are going to accept your connections, but that's great. That means you're growing your audience by what's that? 10-14 people a week. When we say audience, we mean the people you would want to do business with. You sit down, you say, Right, what's my ideal clients? Oh, it's CPAs, it's lawyers, it's veterinarians, whatever it is, there's 200 veterinarians in a 100-mile radius. I'll go and connect to them. Well, there's the next month's worth of connection requests. That's activity number one is grow your audience. Activity number two is then to put content in front of them. If you think about this as a B2B marketing strategy, what we're going to do is we're going to build an audience or audiences of people. That's step one. Step number two is we're then going to build a relationship with them. Well, that's done through content marketing, posting content onto LinkedIn and going to comment on other people's content. Step number three is to commercialize that. Now, when we talk about commercializing it, we have to remember that in B2B sales, more than consumer marketing, people only buy when they are ready to buy. Your job as a business owner is to be in front of them at the moment they are ready to buy. Now, as an example for MSPs, they have a very long sales cycle. They will have a two-week opportunity every five or 10 years with the client. Because the clients, they find an MSP, they stick with them. Something called inertia, loyalty keeps them there where it feels easier to stay where they are than it is to move. What I say to them is, look, build your LinkedIn network, put content in front of those people, and then why not just phone those people or message them? Have try and have a one-to-one conversation and you try and gage where are they emotionally? Are they massively in love with their supplier? In which case, forget them for a few years. Or are they at that point that they're so frustrated? They're at that tipping point where they're starting to think, Do you know what? Maybe we won't sign another contract. Maybe we'll just go and see what's out there. We've got to get that right message in front of that right person at the right time. Actually, if you've got no time at all, you can do all of that within LinkedIn in just 20 minutes a day. It's going to slow. Certainly for MSPs, that's going to be super slow because of how long the sales cycle is. But yeah, you could do that on a B2B basis. For consumer-facing businesses, there's a version of that on either Instagram or Facebook or maybe TikTok, depending on the audience, what audience you want to reach and what platform they use.

Tim Fitzpatrick
There's a ton of value in what you just shared and some really fundamental principles in there. One of the things you mentioned is we need to go where our ideal clients are. Too many people are sticking a line out in the middle of the ocean, hoping that they catch any fish, which is an absolute waste of time. So I love that. We need to be targeted about where we're going to go. And then, like you said, we need to be in the right place at the right time. The only way we're going to do that is through consistency because we don't... How do we know when that trigger is actually going to happen? In the case of MSPs, what's going to happen where they got pissed off at their existing MSP? Maybe they had a cyber attack or something happened with one of their systems. The only way to be there is to be there consistently so that when the trigger happens, they think of you.

Paul Green
Yeah. Well, let me tell you with MSPs, actually, yeah, there's the cyber attack and my computer doesn't break, but those are extreme events. The thing because often if a business isn't already using an MSP, it could be because they haven't got the money or they don't believe in managed services. They just want what's known as break fix. Break fix is the old business model where literally your computer breaks and someone fixes it. I say to my MSP is much better to take unhappy clients from another MSP because they will actually come and spend more with you because they perceive you're better. They are going to leave the old MSP not because of technical problems or technology problems, unless it's extreme problems, but they're going to leave them because of emotional reasons. In fact, my friend, Darren, I did a LinkedIn newsletter about this today. My friend, Darren, sent me a voice note last week. He's a wage slave, works for a marketing agency, and he sent me a voice note saying, Oh, you'll find this funny, Paul. You work with IT people. We have a thing in the office that we never ring our IT support, which is an MSP. We never ring our IT support unless we absolutely have to. If someone's got a problem, we all crowd around their computer and try and fix it ourselves because they're so slow, the MSP is so slow to get back to us and they seem to take days and days to fix something simple, we've just given up with them and we haven't bothered. Now, the boss of that company doesn't know this happens. At some point, though, the boss is going to come out of their office and say, Why are you all crowded around Darren's computer? Oh, we're trying to fix it. Why don't you ring IT support and they'll all look at each other and laugh. At that point, emotionally, the boss is thinking, Well, why am I spending $20,000 a year on this company if my staff don't trust them? Emotionally, he will suddenly disconnect from that MSP and they're not going to get another contract. That's what we're looking for. It's all about the emotional stuff. What's cool? Just finally on this. Sorry, Tim. I could talk about this for hours. No, it's okay. What's cool is as a business owner, you know how other business owners feel. It's about how they think a little bit and it's really about how they feel. What are they scared of? What worries them? What keeps them awake at night? What do they want? What makes them happy? What would make them hug you? You may not be like, I'm not an MSP, I'm not a tech person, but I know how to sell to technical people because I'm a business owner. I've been a business owner for 18 years. I understand how they think and feel. I've laying awake at 4:00 in the morning worrying about cash flow. Not recently, but I've done it. I've had a key member of my staff walk out on me with no notice. I've had a client fire me and sit and think, How am I going to make payroll without this person's money? I've had all of these things as all business owners have, and I think the key for us as business owners, when we're marketing to other business owners, we've got to go with the feelings. It's the feelings that make people buy from you. For those people who are selling to consumers, guess what? You're a consumer as well. If you run a restaurant, what do people really want from a restaurant? It's not the food. The food is the way that the thing is delivered that they actually want, which is the experience. When people go to a restaurant, they want the experience. They want to have fun. They want to have a great date night. They want to show their other half they love them or whatever it is, depending on the restaurant you are. I think even if you're not a marketer, you can be a great marketer. This goes right back to what we were saying at the beginning, wasn't it? About putting yourself in the other person's shoes, is asking yourself, How are they feeling? The vast majority of buying decisions are not done with the brain, they're done with. The heart.

Conclusion

Tim Fitzpatrick
Emotion. Yeah. I love it. Paul, this has been fantastic, man. Any last-minute thoughts you want to leave us with?

Paul Green
Yes. Do something. No light switch marketing. Do something every day. Even if you've only got five minutes, five minutes a day is always better than nothing. Twenty minutes is even better. One hour a day. You can change your entire business in a year by spending one hour a day working on the business and working on your marketing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Where can people learn more about you?

Paul Green
Thank you. I have a website. It's PaulGreensMSPmarketing.com. It's got an S in it. So PaulGreensMSPMarketing.com. All my contact details are there, plus that seven-year's worth of blog and you can find out. If you are an MSP, you can find out there as well about the MSP Marketing Edge.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome, Paul. I really appreciate you taking the time, man. For those of you that are watching, listening, I appreciate you as well. Paul dropped some serious value today, so go check them out. If you want to connect with us, you can always do that over at rialtomarketing.com or if you want to know which of the nine revenue roadblocks are slowing down your growth, you can do that over at revenueroadblocksocrecard.com. Takes less than five minutes, so go check it out. Thank you so much, Paul. Thank you to those that are watching, listening. Until next time, take care.


Connect with Paul Green


Links From The Episode


About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

Tired of marketing that doesn't deliver? Ready to create lasting marketing success?

The world of marketing is vast and constantly evolving. It's easy to fall prey to information overload and feel lost in the marketing maze. In this ever-evolving landscape, expert guidance is critical to navigate successfully.

We understand - marketing your business can be more than just challenging; it can be downright disheartening. But it doesn't have to be. Marketing shouldn't be difficult.

Limited returns on your marketing efforts? Unsure about your next move? Or perhaps you're doing all the "marketing stuff," but it's not working.

This is where our expertise comes into play.

We provide marketing consulting, advisory, and outsourced or part-time marketing executive services. We help MSPs & B2B professional service firms build and manage their marketing engine to get where they want to go faster.

Ready to remove your revenue roadblocks and simplify marketing? It's about time you feel confident in your marketing strategy. Let us help.