What You Need To Know Before Making Your First Marketing Hire

August

12

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Have you been thinking about making your first marketing hire to add to your team? If so, this episode is for you. I’m going to review some of the most important elements to consider before you make the leap.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick for this solo episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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What You Need To Know Before Making Your First Marketing Hire



Have you been thinking about making your first marketing hire to add to your team? If so, this episode is for you. I'm going to review some of the most important elements to consider before you actually make this leap.

Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult and you need to remove your revenue roadblocks if you want to accelerate revenue growth. Thanks so much for taking the time to tune in.

So this whole episode, this idea came up because and this is not the first time this came up, but I was recently speaking to someone about what we do, how we could help them. And in a couple of weeks of back and forth conversations and communications, they made the decision to first hire an in house marketing person to handle some of the implementation work that they wanted to do. And I could just see that there are going to be speed bumps and roadblocks in this for them. And so I'm putting this episode out to help people who are thinking about making this leap. Because here's the reality. Hiring your first marketing person full time to bring on to your team is a huge step that should not be taken lightly. It's a big investment.

Before I actually jumped on to record this, I jumped on salary.com. And I looked at two of the most common positions that we see people hire for first, a marketing coordinator or a marketing manager. So on salary.com, the median salary in Denver, Colorado, which is where I'm based out of for a marketing coordinator, is $60,000 a year. That is just salary, okay? That's not benefits. All the other expenses that you have. For a marketing manager, the median is $113,000. So at a minimum, you're talking about 5000 plus dollars a month to hire for a position like this. So not an insignificant investment. And I want to make sure that if you do this, it's a successful one and it worked out incredibly well for you.

So I'm going to review five different things here where I see common speed bumps, hurdles, roadblocks, whatever you want to call them. First thing, do you have a marketing strategy and a plan for your new hire to work with? If you think that you can hire a marketing coordinator or a manager to put your strategy together and your plan, it's not realistic. That's not what marketing coordinators and managers do. You need higher level executive support to put together that strategy and that plan. And if you don't have that for that new hire, you're starting them at below right, they're in a hole because the strategy and the plan are really the fuel for the marketing vehicles that they're going to use. So if you hire them and you don't have a strategy or plan for them, they've got vehicles and they have no fuel. Okay? Not a good place to be in. So that's first and foremost.

Second, what will their responsibilities be? Have you thought about what you're going to have them do? This is really critically important because this is going to determine the type of person that you hire and who you need to look for. You really need to have a clear understanding of what you're going to have this person do on a daily, weekly, monthly basis for you and make sure that you're going to hire the right person that has the right capabilities. Now, a few of the things that mistakes I see people make here is they expect a marketing coordinator or a manager to know how to do far too many things. Marketing is too broad at this point. There are far too many disciplines. No one is going to know how to do everything really well. Maybe they're going to know how to do a number of different things okay, but is that really what you want? Or do you want somebody that knows certain things really well and they're going to execute on those things fantastically.The other question here is once you understand what you want this person to do, you really need to ask yourself, do I need to hire somebody in house? Like, is this a full time job? Do I need to hire in house or can I outsource this? Right? There are multiple ways to outsource it. You could hire a marketing virtual assistant who works remotely, virtually, and get this thing done. They don't need to be somebody that's in house or can you outsource this to a marketing agency or multiple marketing providers to get this stuff done for you? OK? The thing you need to keep in mind here is you still need somebody to manage whether they're in house, it's a marketing agency, or you've outsourced to a freelancer or a virtual assistant. You still need somebody that knows what they're doing to manage the marketing players that you have on your team. So that's two.

Now, third thing, how are you going to evaluate each candidate? And this comes back to question two, which is what are the responsibilities going to be? But once you start the interview process and you start looking for people, how are you going to evaluate them? Do you understand what they should be doing? Is how they do it going to be effective? How are you going to evaluate that? If you don't really understand what they should be doing and what the most effective way is to do it, I think the question you need to ask yourself and you need to be honest here is are you the right person to actually hire and manage this person? You may not now, there are solutions to that, but you've got to have a way to evaluate each and every candidate because if you don't, it's very easy to make a mishire. Look, hiring is a crapshoot anyways. I think there are a lot of things that we as business owners can do to tip the odds in our favor, but it's still a crapshoot. So you want to make sure that you really understand exactly what you need to do to effectively evaluate each and every candidate so you make the best, hire.

Fourth point I want to touch on, and I did just touch on this a little bit, is who's going to manage this new hire? A lot of times what I see is the business owner is making the hire and managing that person and marketing is not there. If marketing is not your thing and you're trying to manage it, it is going to be a very difficult thing to manage because you don't know what they should be doing, right, how they should be doing it. And you may not have the skill set to actually support them, to get better and better at their job and to get better results. So if you're in that boat. And by the way. There are a lot of business owners that are in this boat where, man, you just don't have the time, the skill set, or the desire to run your marketing. You may need to bring somebody else in to assist with your in house team. Right? Some part time executive level support to manage that person to make sure that they're going to get drive the results that you expect. So you really need to think about that and be honest with yourself. Are you the best person to manage this new hire? And if not, you may need to allocate additional budget to bring somebody else in to manage that person. And that is one of the things that we do.We come in and help people who need that executive level marketing support, but they're not ready to hire a two $300,000 a year chief Marketing officer. So you can have inhouse people and have executive level support without hiring fulltime for it. So if you're in that boat, you do have options.

Now, fifth thing I want to touch on here are just some quick don'ts, okay? One, don't hire a senior marketing leader first as your full time hire, okay? In most cases, you don't need a Vice president of Marketing or a Chief Marketing officer as your first marketing hire because here's what's going to happen. You're going to end up paying way more for what that person's doing than you really need to. Because inevitably what happens when people hire executive level people first is they have the executive level people doing implementation activities, creating social posts, putting together email marketing campaigns, things like that. You don't need to pay somebody that much to do that, so it's not a good use of your resources. You can get far further, frankly, if you have the 2000 $300,000 budget, you can drive so much more activity by hiring a coordinator or a manager in house, hiring somebody part time to run and lead your marketing efforts get that executive level support but not hire somebody full time for it. You could get so much mileage for your budget. So don't hire a senior level person first. I think that is a huge mistake.

The other big trap people fall into is thinking that I can hire a marketing coordinator or a manager and they'll get everything. You'll get everything you need in one hire. Unicorns? They don't exist. It's like I said, marketing is so broad at this point. You can't hire somebody and expect them to do your SEO, your social media, your content marketing, your email marketing, understand the strategy, put all your plans together. That person does not exist. So you've got to get that out of your head. Because if you hire somebody thinking that's going to happen, it's not. You're going to get 3,4,5,6 months down the road and realize, oh my God, I need something else in addition to this person that I just hired. I don't have all the pieces that I need.

I hope you found this helpful. If you are thinking about this man, it is a congrats for being in the position to even think about doing this. You just want to make sure that you avoid some of the roadblocks stumbling blocks that I touched on. And I want the best for you. I want you to hire somebody that's going to do a great job and meet your expectations.

So if you are in this boat where you're thinking about hiring somebody and you want some outside eyes, I would be happy to chat with you. You can head on over to rialtomarketing.com. R-I-A-L-T-O marketing.com and click on the book, your free GPS call, and on that call we can talk about your goals, plans, strategies, and I'll help guide you in the direction that makes the most sense for you based on where you are and where you want to go.

The other thing that a lot of people find super helpful that we offer is over at growthmarketingplan.com. At Growthmarketingplan.com, we have the 90 day marketing plan template that we use for our business, for our clients. The instructional videos, the template, sample plans. Everything you need to get started on your marketing plan so that you can start seeing results. Today is right there at growthMarketingPlan.com.

So thanks so much for tuning in. I appreciate you. Till next time. Take care.


About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

Do you know you have an opportunity for revenue growth and are unsure how to make it happen? Do you lack someone with the time, skill set, and desire to take ownership of marketing to drive results?

When it comes to marketing, it's easy to fall prey to information overload. We understand how overwhelming and frustrating marketing your business can be. But, marketing shouldn't be difficult.

At Rialto Marketing, we work with B2B professional service firms that want to accelerate revenue growth and attract more ideal clients.

So, stop gambling with your marketing budget each month. Put an end to guessing what your next marketing step should be and hoping it works. It's time to remove your revenue roadblocks.

Wouldn't you like to reach your revenue goals faster? Let us run your marketing, so you don't have to.