Where You Are Is Not Where You Have To Be

Where You Are Is Not Where You Have To Be

Strong communication and speaking can be a roadblock at times for even the best of us. Are you confident in your communication and speaking skills? If not, we have Mike Acker from Advance Coaching & Consulting to share his best tips to help you realize your potential. 

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Where You Are Is Not Where You Have To Be



Tim Fitzpatrick
Strong communication and speaking skills can be a roadblock for even the best of us. Are you confident in your communication and speaking skills? If not, our special guest today is going to share some of his best tips to help you realize your full potential.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Hi, I am Timfitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing where we believe marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the right plan. I am really excited to have with me today, Mike Acker from Advanced Coaching and Consulting. Mike is also the author or co-author of five books with more on the way. Mike, I can't wait to dig into this, but welcome and thanks for being here.

Mike Acker
Thank you so much, Tim. I look forward to diving in and providing something concrete for your audience today.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. I know we're going to dig into that. Before we do that, I want to ask you some rapid-fire questions to help us get to know you a little bit. You ready to jump in with both feet here?

Mike Acker
Alright, let's go.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. When you're not working, how do you like to spend your time?

Mike Acker
Either just hanging out with family or going sailing. That's my newest thing.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. Because you grew up in the Seattle area. You are now in Alabama. How far away from the coast are you in Alabama?

Mike Acker
We have the big Mobile Bay which is right there, that's right off into the ocean. And so it's a great place to go sailing. And we're about 10, 15 minutes away from the spot where our boat is moored.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay, not bad. That's pretty close. What's your hidden talent?

Mike Acker
My hidden talent is that I can still swing dance and salsa dance. It's been a while, but I did it for a long time to classes and even taught some swing dancing and still know how to do it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Love it. What's the best piece of advice you've ever been given?

Mike Acker
Don't take yourself too seriously. And this is specifically geared up towards marriage of brand new married. And I said don't take yourself too seriously and I can take myself seriously at times. So it's a good reminder sometimes just in life to just back off. Not everything is a big deal.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I like that one. That's one I definitely need to take into consideration more, that's for sure. What's one thing about you that surprises people.

Mike Acker
I grew up in in Mexico. So I speak Spanish quite fluently, but I have a lot of (speaks spanish). And so I have clients actually in Spain and in Mexico and other places that speak Spanish.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Now another thing that you told me before we jumped on air is that you were a pastor for 18 years?

Mike Acker
Yeah. 18 years.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Okay. That's another thing I bet a lot of people would surprise a lot of people. So those are two very cool things. What does success mean to you?

Mike Acker
Ultimate success is that at the end of the day, it's not about what you have, but who you belong to. And if you think about some people have a lot, but they don't feel like they're connected in intimate relationships. So it's about those intimate relationships about who you are doing life with and successes in one big time thing is what happens every single day that you're building your life towards.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Love it. Where's your happy place?

Mike Acker
Just relaxing with my family.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Or being on your sail boat?

Mike Acker
Not quite yet. It's got to get to that spot. That's what I do in my downtime, but hasn't got to the spot where it's just second-hand.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What qualities do you value in the people you spend time with?

Mike Acker
I like people who are not just about themselves but who are going to listen to others. So we went out with some friends this last weekend and just love hanging out with them because of the type of people who are going to be very interested in you, which then you talk about yourself and we don't feel bad. And then you ask them and they talk about themselves. And so there's so much give, give, give, give, give, that at the end of the day, you just had so much fun.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome. So, Mike, tell us a little bit more about what you're doing at Advanced Coaching and Consulting? Who you're working with? How you're helping them? And then we're going to jump into this communication and speaking topic.

Mike Acker
Right. Through Advanced Coaching & Consulting, my big focus is to help people realize their potential. The idea is this, that in you there's a potential to communicate stronger with greater impact, with greater effectiveness. And so I'll want you to be able to do that. And I bring that out in you through whether it's a keynote speech that I'm presenting or it's a workshop that I'm leading or clients that I'm walking through with programs that's a big focus on communication. And then the flip side of communication is leadership. These two really go hand in hand. A leader who can communicate well has great, great potential ahead of them. A leader who can't communicate well is going to be really capped at some point in time is going to need to learn how to communicate better. Likewise, a communicator will often be seen as a leader, so they'll be put in spots of leadership like that salesperson that does really well, is put in the spot of leadership or that person who's just very charismatic. But if they don't have leadership, they won't go that far. So I like to work on both those areas with people in those different forms.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Love it. Thank you for sharing that. So let's jump into it. Where a lot of us can struggle sometimes with communication. I mean, there's a lot of moving pieces nuances there. Where do we get confidence in communication? Where does it come from?

Mike Acker
So there's actually three sources of confidence and communication, and this is actually my framework that I walk through people with. And this is actually the book that I'm currently working on, even though I have another one that's going to be published in advance. So confidence and communication comes from three different sources: who you are - your identity, what you say- your messaging and your skills - how you say it. So think about it like your heart, your head, your hands, your heart, what is going on on the inside of your being, how you consider yourself, your soul, your interior, your mind, how you're organizing your thoughts not only for you, but also for the people you're talking to, and then everything that you're doing visually. So as I'm talking right here, you're paying attention to my enunciation, to my intonation. You're even seeing what I'm doing, my hands with my eyes, you're looking at my posture. It's all my nonverbals, including some of my verbals. And so all of that are my skills that I'm using to connect with you. Your confidence and communication comes when you have a good combination of all three. You have a firm identity that isn't just someone offstage confident, but also on-stage confident. Sometimes people are very confident offstage with their friends, with their hobbies in their workplace, doing the tasks that they are supposed to do, but they're not confident on stage. So what we want is that identity that you have off stage to be brought with you on stage. We'll talk about that more in one of the further questions. Then the messaging. A lot of people know what they're saying and just assume because they know what they're saying and they know it really well. And when they start saying that people understand what they're saying. One of the great ways to know, if you can communicate what you know, can you communicate it to the kid? Because if you can't communicate, that what you're talking to others about to a kid, it's going to be hard for you really to be understood. Now, you might be thinking, but, Mike, the areas I talk about are really technical. I get it. I have people who talk about things that I don't understand, but they need to at least be able to communicate the flow of what they're saying. I'm walking through this. I'm going to walk through this. We're going to walk through this. And a five year old should be able to understand that.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love that. In marketing, we call that the curse of knowledge, right? We know our subjects so well that we assume when we speak, people are going to understand it. And most people don't I hate to say dumb down because you're not doing that. You need to communicate it in a way that it's easy for anyone to understand. So I love the analogy of, look, if your five-year-old can understand it, then you're doing a good job.

Mike Acker
Right. I love this. Take a moment on this because it's all part of messaging confidence. And my son was yesterday taking a drumming lesson from a professional. And so this guy knows his stuff. He's an audio engineer, actually went to Berkeley, which you went to Berkeley. This guy has all this experience. He's got this knowledge. And the moment he met with my son, you could see he did not dumb it down. He didn't try to pretend beats per minute or anything other than beats for a minute, but he brought it down and said, "Now you see your heart and your heart goes bump, bump, bump, bump, bump, bump. Those are called beats per minute. How many beats is." So he was able to simplify it so that my son could understand it. And then he drew different notes in color, because my son has a drum Paterson color. So he's bringing that knowledge that he could talk about on a high level, as someone who has a degree in this from Berkeley, and he's bringing it down to him, he's simplifying it. And as a communicator, we need to be able to do that. So if we're talking about Cardiology, okay, there's some terms that I don't even understand it there. But ultimately, you still got to be able to say, "Well, you know, our hearts there, right? And simplifying it down to a spot where people can understand it. It's not that when you communicate it, you communicate that way, but you need to be able to put it into that kind of framework that can be understood by anybody.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah.

Mike Acker
So that you then know, I'm going to go from A-B-C-D-E-F-G versus all kinds of Greek symbols or something else.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. I love that. So identity, messaging, and then the third one?

Mike Acker
The third one is skills. All the external areas in which you communicate the way that I communicate this and the way I teach this is if I go out on a football field with you, Tim, and say, you're an accomplished football player or a hockey player even worse, I know nothing about hockey. I can barely ice skate, and I can do a little bit of football, but I'm not going to feel extremely comfortable and I might mess around. I probably joke around a little bit about it because I'm lacking confidence in that, because I don't have skills. I believe in myself, and I know who I am off stage and on stage. But in that moment, my skills are going to be so deficient that I don't really know how to participate. Or if you want to talk about hockey, I have no idea. If you want to talk about medicine, I have no idea. And so I'm probably just going to shut up and stop talking because I can't be conversant in it. So then I go on a soccer field with you, and then I'm going to feel at ease. I'll start joking around. I'll be even more myself because I grew up playing soccer since I was kindergarten. So the more skills you have, the more confidence we all get that. It's obvious. Oh Yeah. Makes sense. Well, the more skills that you know in terms of communication, eye contact, your posture, your breathing, your intonation your facial expressions, your smiles, in other words, warming up your face with a Duchenne smile and all these different things, the more you know about that, you go, "Oh, I can do this. I can go up in front. And even in the moment, if I'm nervous, I can get up in there, show my skills. And as my skills are out there, I start feeling more confident because I know that I'm doing it with some level of proficiency."

Tim Fitzpatrick
So the skills lay that foundation that you can start to build from and give you the confidence to even if you don't have a lot of experience, get out there and do what you need to do.

Mike Acker
So I would actually say that the foundation is the identity part. But if you haven't worked on the identity yet, your skills can buy some time as you're reminding yourself of the value that you have in front of people and that that you are able to get up in front of there. So you want to fake it until you make it five years from now. And a lot of people do that. They fake it til they maybe make it some day, but you can begin to fake it so that you can make have some time while you're developing your identity as a speaker and messaging. Also, it's not even so much faking it as when I know I'm doing something well, it actually changes the way I see myself. So if I get up in front of people and I know that I'm connecting, then I go, "Oh, look, I'm connecting with those people." And build that confidence up. And then what I do, I skillfully connect even more. And then I go, "Look how well I'm connected with people." And then I engage some more skills. And so it allows me to keep on building. So all of these three go hand in hand. It's like a Venn diagram, all three of the mark overlapping.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So you got to have all three. If one of them is missing something, is the wheels are going to come off in some way, shape or form.

Mike Acker
Yeah, absolutely. So if you have identity and messaging, but you don't have skills, you're going to be boring. If you have identity and skills, but you don't have messaging, you're just going to be entertaining people. Because you have nothing worth saying. And if you have skills and you have messaging, but you don't have identity, you're just being shallow and leaving people feeling like you're a hypocrite or that they're going to be apathetic because you're not really in it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Okay. Cool. I love it, man. We have a very similar approach with marketing. Marketing strategy trilogy, your target market, your messaging, and you have to have a plan of how you're going to get that message in front of those people. So similar philosophy just applied to something different. That really resonates with me. I love that. So you had touched on identity. And I think unless I'm off, I think this is where we're going with this next question, which is what does it mean for you to be you in speaking?

Mike Acker
Right. So that really is one of the seven strategies in my first book that I wrote, Speak With No Fear. Speak With No Fear I wrote two years ago. It's gone on to be the top-rated book in the world on a topic of overcoming fear of speaking. Most of the reviews are great. There are some reviews that are not great.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Everybody's perfect.

Mike Acker
You can't be all things to all people. And even the perfect books aren't liked by everybody. And so in the book, I talk about you be you. The idea is this, that when you get in front of people, you often switch to a different personhood. So here I am off stage. But now I'm going on stage, and I feel like I should be like this. I was working with one individual who said, "Mike, I need to be calm, cool and collected." I said, "Well, tell me about yourself." And he said, "Well, I'm outgoing, I'm loud. I'm always the life of the party." And I said, "There's a big disconnect right here because your everything that is the opposite of calm, cool, and collected." And they said, "I know that's the problem. So I need to be calm, cool, and collected." And I said, "Why do you want to be like that?" And they said, "Well, everybody's calm, cool and collective there. They're all like this and this and this. And that's how they come across. And so I'm not good because of that." And I said, "Hopefully they're being true to themselves. But I don't want you to try to be like them. An imitation of them. I want you to be a really good version of yourself." So here's my little quote that I say, getting in about this, you'll never be a great imitation of someone else. So don't settle to be a poor imitation of someone else. Be the best version of yourself. When you get in front of people, there's often this idea of I got to be like that podcast guy I listened to, or I got to be like that TV show, or I love listening to such and such politician or such and such preacher or that teacher that I had. One person came in and said, "I want to become like this." I said, "Why do you want to become like that?" "Because my drill Sergeant, when I was a young private, was just like that." And I said, "Well, tell me about yourself." Once again, very different. So in their mind, someone that they want to be like but they can't because it's not them. There's aspects that you can learn and encourage yourself, but you need to study yourself, become a very big student, someone who's just immersed in yourself. Know what makes you tick. Know what you're good at, know what you're not good at and come to accept it, come to appreciate it, and improve parts of yourself so you can get better. In the book, I talk about how one we're in front of people, you carry two weights. So, Tim, if you think about front lateral raises, right? I've been pulling my hands in front of me. If I put 10 lbs in my left hand, after a short period of time, it's going to shake. Even with my massive muscles, it's going to be, you see, massive. But after a while, it's going to get to shake. Now, I take that same ten pound weight. And the smallest, petite little mom can carry a ten pound baby all day close to her chest, because the closer to you, the less torque is on your arm and the easier to carry. So when you're speaking, you have two weights. You have the weight of content. All of that what you're trying to say. So I know all of this material very well, and so I don't need to look at notes. I've taught of it. I've written about it. A coach on it. So that content is not far away from me. It's close to me. But if you have me coming to talk to you about, well, it might be Cardiology. Well, the heart is in your body, and

Tim Fitzpatrick
I think it's four Chambers, right? Something like that.

Mike Acker
Baby. That one is called the Chamber of Secrets. Snake inside there. Harry Potter is good. I don't even know. Right. I don't know anything. So it's going to be far away from our body. So we all know that the closer we know the content, the better we're going to be communicating. But likewise, there's one of personhood on your right arm. You have the weight of personhood and the further away from your body that you hold that arm, the further away from you that you're trying to be, the shakier you're going to get. And a lot of people, without even realizing it, are trying to be someone other than themselves, they switch into speaker mode. And now I'm speaking. So here I am talking with somebody. Okay. Now I got to get up here and talk to everybody and be authoritative and serious or whatever it might be. Now I got to be the life of the party and inside they're cringing while they're trying to fake this persona. And that's definitely not what I mean by skills. So you need to know yourself and then let yourself shine through, because the closer you are to being you, the more confident you're going to feel. You mentioned my pastoring career. So I started when I was 20 years old, and at the age of 26, I was asked to be a senior pastor of a small church. I felt fairly confident and knew myself when I was speaking to our youth and kids. But I didn't know who I was. I didn't feel like I could be myself, the same one that they hired and that they knew after four years of being there, I didn't feel like I could be that person in front of adults, like real adults, because 26 wasn't a real adult. There are doctors and physicians, I mean, it was the same thing, lawyers and other people. They're professionals, real people and people who own businesses and have been adults for a long time. And so I embarked on a quest to find myself. So I would listen to different pastors around America, religiously pun intended, and I would try to be like them. So one week I was like, Rick one. All right. So my friend Rick's wife and I would literally memorize his sermons and regurgitate them. And then one week got to be TD jakes, which is a famous black preacher. So you know what? You it just didn't fit. And other times I would be like the super intellectual guy. And other times I would be the super vagaries. And I talked about the book. I think the Church grew because people are like, what's going to happen?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Who is he going to be this week?

Mike Acker
Who is he going to be? And I'm not even good at imitating, as you just noticed. But eventually I realized that all of those were foreign to myself. And while there's things I could take from him, I needed to realize who I was. And so I study myself, did every personality profile you could imagine. So if you're out there thinking I get nervous in front of people, learn who you are and bring that person onto the platform.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. So last thing we're going to dig into here today, how does it's not about you add to confidence?

Mike Acker
Do you remember 8th grade dances, Tim?

Tim Fitzpatrick
Very vaguely. I think I've tried to put it out of my mind. Actually, I don't even think I really went to many of them.

Mike Acker
Right. And that's part of the point, actually. It's funny because nowadays it's like school organizers have realized that 8th graders aren't quite ready to go to dances. You blow up parties and the stuff as long as along with the dance. But when I used to go to those dances, I remember watching. And I remember seared in my memory, I lived in Mexico at the time, so there was a lot of dances, and all the girls would be dressed up on one side. All the guys would be dressed up on the other side, and they're just kind of staring with each other across the room from each other. They're like, "Oh, hey, there's the girls over there and the guys over there." Well, they wanted to talk to each other. They just didn't have confidence to talk to each other. And the reason why, one of the reasons why is because you're thinking, what are they thinking about me? What do they think about me? What are the girls think about me? What are my friends think about me? Am I tough? Am I cool? Do I look nice? Am I Handsome? Am I beautiful? Am I charming? What do people think about me? What do people think about me? Meanwhile, every single other person is also thinking, what are they thinking about me? What do they think about it? And at some point in time, my friend and I noticed that girls were really wanting somebody to dance with them. And they were really nervous that they would be the person that would not be dance with. In fact, in the 9th grade, we went to quinceneras. And so every single weekend, we went to these 15 year old birthday parties with a girl, the quincenera the birthday girl would have to dance with her family. And then she would be desperately hoping that her guy friends would be dancing with her because she didn't want to be like the one girl who didn't have guy friends. So my friends and I realized that, you know what? They don't care what they look like here. It's great. They don't even care if we smell. They don't care if we know how to dance. All they want to do is be seen with a boy dancing in front of everybody. And when we realized that it was not about us and that they didn't really care anything about us, they just wanted to feel comfortable. We realized now we gained this confidence and we'd go up and we'd always be the first guy friends dancing, dancing with the quincenera. So I've taken that into my adult life. When we go into different places speaking. See, when I started the speech and Tim, you were a great guest. You ask nice questions. At the same time as you're being a guest, you're thinking about some other things you're thinking about your podcast. Is this going to be good for my podcast? Is this going to be good for the image that I want Rialto Marketing to do? So there's a concern for you and you're at stake. And even more so everybody listening right now, you're hoping that tuning into Rialto Marketing podcast is going to help you. And if it doesn't, the podcast is going to have a short shelf life for you. So you want this to help you. You don't really care. You're a nice person. So the moment I say this, there's a little reaction, but you don't really care if Tim is having a good day or if Mike is having a good day. You want something for you. Now, what that does for the communicator, the speaker, the team leader, the person talking is it's very freeing, because instead of worrying if you think my shirt looks good or if you notice some wrinkles or if my tie is good, actually forgot to button up the top button, that's a real thing, I just realized. Instead of worrying about that, all I need to worry about is, can I give you something that will help you? That's really freeing. Because now the attention is not on me. You're concerned about you. When you jump onto a plane, you don't really care if the pilot is balding or if the pilot is 40 or 60. All you care is if the pilot can get you to where you are wanting to go and get you there safely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So the moment we can stop worrying about ourselves, when we're communicating and speaking and flip it and focus on the audience, whoever that may be that ends up giving us confidence.

Mike Acker
It takes away the insecurity of all eyes on me. It takes away the insecurity of what will they think about me. And I'm sure there are thoughts about me. But if I can give you something of value, then you stop thinking about me. It's interesting. I mentioned the review on my book, and there's out of so many reviews and so many people called out to me. There's people who would say stuff like "This really helped me." The negative ones are actually focused on Mike. Is that interesting? So the negative ones are Mike just wants to tell stories about himself because there's a lot of stories in that book. It's more motivational, anecdotal book with some tactics and actions. But the people who really got what I was going for got the heart. "This helped me. He made me feel at peace. This helped me have confidence to get there." It's all about themselves and how it affected them. The negatives are all about Mike.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. It's fascinating to me how I see a lot of similarities in what we're talking about today and how we approach marketing and what a lot of people talk about marketing. It's so interesting because you can take things in all walks of life and apply them in another. And so I think it's so important to have such an open mind, because here you're talking about, hey, it's not all about you, and it's not right. You're here to add value, and you are. It's a fascinating conversation. Marketing is the same thing. So many people in a marketing standpoint talk about themselves, and it's like, look, our customers don't care about us. They care about what we can do for them. How can we help them solve the problem that they have and they don't want? Or how can we help them get the results that they want and don't have. That's what we need to talk about. That's the only thing that they care about. When we talk about speaking and communication, it's the same thing. Forget about you. Focus on the audience and what your goal is, what you're trying to do for them. Did I get that?

Mike Acker
Absolutely. That book Naked by Patrick Lencioni. He talks about how a consulting firm would go in and try to tell everybody this is what we can do for you. This is what we can do. This is what we're good at. And this is the price. And then the ideal marketing firm, which is Patrick Lencioni's tables groups philosophy, is just go in and start helping. And if you can really help people, then they'll actually want more of it. So every day I start out with this prayer, I just say, "God help me help people today." So whether it's on a podcast that I'm not getting paid for, that's just get out there. Hopefully people buy my book. Absolutely. Love it. Maybe some people reach out to me. That'd be great. Or maybe just for that person that's driving down the road right now and has a presentation coming up, you feel at peace, like, "Oh, that makes sense. Maybe I gave you just some idea of all if you can work on your skills. And so by giving that to you, I already have an answer to the prayer." Sometimes I go into these consultations. I do free consultations for people looking at improving their leadership or their communication and love to share those in your show notes as well. And when people go into that consultation, my goal is let me just help someone. So generally I'll ask them questions, and then I'll say, "Why don't you dive into something that you have to give?" And if they're comfortable with that, they start diving into a couple of minute presentation. And always I'm able to see something that's low-hanging fruit that they can work on right away. And this is what I do all day long. So I'm able to help them. And sometimes they go, "Man, that's great." And they don't buy. Sometimes they just go get my book. And sometimes they sign up for a program, or sometimes they become a friend and all of those different are wins. So if we can just approach life, whether we're a builder, architect, a grocery store owner, dry clean or whatever it is, and we just say at the end of the day, I'm going to help people, and it's not going to be about me. I believe that in the and we'll end up making more money and feeling good about the money we make versus just trying to go after the dollars.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. So any last minute words of wisdom, thoughts you want to leave us with? I love that last thought. But anything else you want to add on to that?

Mike Acker
Absolutely. So we call this the beginning where you are is not where you have to stay. And that is a great way to end. If you're in a spot where you're stuck, you don't have to stay there. You can get out. And you have to believe that you can get out. You have to believe that you can go forward before getting into the strategies of the book that I write. I write before you begin, believe. And you got to believe that you can. Because if you can't, you're right. And if you believe, you can, you're right. I think that's a Henry Ford quote. Whether you think you can or can't, you're right. So believe that where you are, it's not where you have to stay, whether that's your an unknown business and you need some Rialto Marketing, a little plug for you.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Thank you. I appreciate that, Mike.

Mike Acker
Whether It's a leadership. Whether it's interviewing, whatever it is, that where you are. It's not where you have to stay.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. Where can people learn more about you, Mike?

Mike Acker
Mike Acker dot com is a great spot to do. So you can go to Amazon, type in. Mike Acker I have five books out there. I have another one coming up in a couple of months. And then the one that I was actually talking about, it's actually a few months down the road working on it right now. So Mike Acker dot com or on Amazon, you can find me all over the web. Mike Acker dot com is what my Facebook or my Instagram. My Twitter is, but ultimately just go to Mike Acker dot com.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Cool. So, Mike, and then that's A-C-K-E-R dot com. If you've been watching or listening to this, you know Mike knows what he's talking about. If you are struggling with leadership, communication, speaking, please reach out to Mike, have that initial conversation with them, and at the very least, he's going to give you some value. Right?

Mike Acker
That's right. Free consultation.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's it. Awesome. I love it. Mike, thanks so much for taking the time to be with us today and to share your experience and your knowledge with us. Thank you for those that are tuning in. If you want to gain some clarity on where to focus your marketing efforts right now to get the best return you're running into some roadblocks, you're not sure what that next step should be. Hop on over to our website, Rialto Marketing dot com. That's R-I-A-L-T-O Marketing dot com. Click on the get a free consultation button. I, like Mike, we'll be happy to chat with you and help give you some value and some clarity on what those next steps should be. So thanks so much for tuning in until next time. Take care.


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About the Author Tim Fitzpatrick

Tim Fitzpatrick is the President of Rialto Marketing. At Rialto Marketing, we help service businesses simplify marketing so they can grow with less stress. We do this by creating and implementing a plan to communicate the right message to the right people. Marketing shouldn't be difficult. All you need is the RIGHT plan.

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