Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners that are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience.

Join Tim Fitzpatrick and Gary McConnell for this week’s episode of The Rialto Marketing Podcast!

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Zoom Out To Accelerate Growth

Tim Fitzpatrick
Welcome to the Rialto Marketing podcast. Today's episode is a revenue acceleration series interview where we talk to seven figure B2B professional service firm owners who are actively trying to grow their business and get to the next level. We talk about the good, the bad and the ugly so that you can learn from their experience. Hi, I am Tim Fitzpatrick with Rialto Marketing, where we believe you must remove your revenue roadblocks to accelerate growth and marketing shouldn't t be difficult. I want to thank you so much for taking the time to tune in. I am really excited to have Gary McConnel from VirtuIT Systems with me today. Gary, welcome and thanks for being here, man.

Gary McConnell
Thanks for the intro, Tim. Very excited to be talking to you today.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I'm excited to dig into this, man. You have an interesting background, one that's different from a lot of the owners or CEOs that are running companies. So super excited to dig into this with you. Before we do that, I want to ask you a few rapid fire questions. You ready to jump in?

Gary McConnell
I'm ready to jump in, yes.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Very quickly, what do you do? How long have you been doing it?

Gary McConnell
I'm the CEO of VirtuIT Systems. Quick 30 seconds spiel on who VirtuIT is. We're an enterprise data center technology company at heart. We focus on helping customers architect deploy and manage their data center infrastructure, whether it be something that's on prem or a cloud ready solution for customers that are looking to leverage more of a hybrid cloud environment, just helping them down that IT journey and being their complementary team along the way. VirtuIT has been around since 2006. I've been here for eight or nine plus years now. The time has flown.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Time flies when you're having fun, right?

Gary McConnell
That's right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
So in that eight to nine years, what's the most important lesson you've learned?

Gary McConnell
The most important lesson I've learned is to continue learning because the minute you think you know it all, something else gets thrown at you. It's funny. I started off in inside sales, have moved over to operations. The minute you master one job, you think you know it all and you realize how little you actually know along the way. So you continue learning.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Man, none of us have it figured out. We're all still learning each and every day. So I love that one. Gary, we all know growing a business can be challenging at times. Do you have any mantra or motivational saying that you say to yourself, share with your team to push through those times?

Gary McConnell
Sure. So I have one that immediately comes to mind, and I'm not going to take full credit for it because I work with an executive coach that helps me a lot. This helped me along this journey. The one thing that he's continually pushing me on is, Hey, Gary, zoom out. Get out of the trenches. Where are you going? If you're focusing on activities that point you toward the path you're supposed to be headed down, the day to day becomes much easier to handle. So zoom out is my mantra that I like to use.

Tim Fitzpatrick
That's a good one. It's very similar to, Hey, we got to work on our business rather than in it. I've never really heard anybody refer to it as Zoom out. So it's a very interesting way to think about it, right? But we've got to think about the high level and get out of the trenches, if you will, if we're going to manage and lead successfully. I love that one.

Diversifying Marketing to Generate More Leads

Tim Fitzpatrick

I want to take us back a little bit. You shared an experience with me during the pre interview. It was about three or four years ago. You guys realized that you needed to generate more leads for the company. Can you describe just what was going on at that point and what you did to start generating more leads at that point?

Gary McConnell
Sure. Being an enterprise technology company, we work a lot with OEMs, which is Original Endpoint Manufacturers, and we establish relationships with them and frankly, develop a very deep skill set. So by virtue of that, we're working with the OEM managers. For example, Dell EMC is probably our largest partner. So we do a lot of Dell EMC infrastructure. So working with their sales and marketing teams, they would naturally loop us in to opportunities or customers that were looking for a solution in the Northeast or along the East Coast, saying, Hey, VirtuIT is a great partner that we've worked with. We'll work alongside them with you to help you architect design and deploy this solution. We often act as an outsourced IT arm for the OEMs.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it.

Gary McConnell
It became a referral word of mouth method of generating leads.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Got it. That's where a lot of your business was coming from at the time?

Gary McConnell
A lot of the business was coming from from that source at the time. Our owner, still owns, is our owner to this day, presented the challenge in front of our sales team, our marketing team, and said, Hey, we envision that these partnerships continuing to develop and be strong, but all our eggs are in one basket in terms of lead generation. We need to diversify how we get in front of customers, whether it be growing our deals with existing customers or getting front of, more importantly, net new logos. How do we branch out and what does that look like was our main challenge, not three, but more so four years ago, like we talked about.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What did you guys choose to do at that point?

Gary McConnell
It's funny. We read a bunch of marketing books. I think one of them was called the One Page Marketing Plan. I read every year, there's SEO books that come out with the new year. Seo, for those in the industry or those that operate with SEO as part of their business, know how quickly it changes. At the time, it was SEO 2018. Actually, Tim, we might be five years ago. We read the book and we said, Man, this sucks. This is not something that's going to get us leads next month. It's going to take some time, but we need to do it. Slowly, I don't want to say moving away because we still do traditional marketing practices like the in person events. We've always been able to get people to events, but frankly, the ROI hit for us has always been much higher on digital practices. Moving away from in person events and you go and you get a one pager and you drop your business card into a box and maybe you want to give away in shifting more to what does a virtual event look like? One example is we've done Whiskey Tastings where we ship out bourbon kits to our customers and we have a professional bour taster get on a Zoom and walk us through five high end bourbons. Obviously, that's after we go through our technical spiel. I would say 90 % of it is fun, 10 % of it is business, but it's ability to build connections with potential customers to get in front of them and show them your technology at frankly at a much lower cost than renting out a venue and catering food and all the other things that go into a traditional marketing practice. Without compromising marketing efforts and the effectiveness of them, the digital arena has been much more favorable for us. Going off of that, SEO has been I mentioned SEO 2018. One thing we tell our engineers when we're working on blog posts or website enhancements is, Hey guys, this isn't Yes, it's marketing, but the only thing an effective marketing team should be doing is highlighting the knowledge that you guys already have as an engineering team in the technical skill set that you establish through certifications, hands on experience. We like to call it preparedness for battle and performance in battle. Preparedness in battle is the ability to pass a certification. Performance in battle is putting those skills to use in a customer environment and showing, Hey, I don't just walk the walk. I talk the talk as well.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Virtual events, SEO, anything else you're investing in on the marketing side at this point?

Gary McConnell
The one thing I can tell you we stay away from I don't know if it's we just haven't been effective as it or it's too much of a short term hit for us. It has been just paid ads.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Paid ads.

Gary McConnell
We've stayed very I know there's firms out there that are effective with it. I know there's marketing companies that tell you they can generate X amount of multiples of whatever dollar you spend. We have not been effective with paid ads. Frankly, we've been able to take that marketing budget and allocate it elsewhere in terms of outbound email has been a key for us. The one thing we used to do in the past was we'd have all these big long emails that contained all this content and we thought, This is great. We're going to put all of the content in front of the customer and they're going to pick and choose what they like and they'll respond. Again, you quickly learn there that less is more in one sentence at most or to perform much better in terms of an email. Hey, looking to have a conversation about how we can save you $900,000 in ransomware, question mark. That's it. Builds intrigue, captures attention. We don't get responses all the time, but it's much more effective than inundating a potential customer with information.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Do you have somebody that's doing that for you, or some of your people in house are doing that?

Gary McConnell
We do it internally and we have a partner that we leverage as well. Frankly, we A B test our internal efforts versus theirs. See how we do it. That's right.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I love it. It's good. What does your marketing team look like at this point? Do you have inhouse people? Is it all outside resourced? What's that look like?

Gary McConnell
We have two inhouse people and then we outsource the other avenues. I like to think of marketing as two avenues. I'm going to oversimplify it, but you have inbound and you have outbound. Inbound is how do we bring customers to us? That's everything from SEO and blog writing and content descriptions. And outbound is, hey, let's go get ourselves in front of customers and have conversations with our sales reps. Those efforts are done both internally and externally. Going back to the thought process of, Let's not pull all of our eggs in one basket. We're able to show our partners what has worked for us, and they can in turn adopt it in their efforts. If we win, they win, and vice versa. They do the same for us. Hey, we're seeing these type of responses, Gary, or to the marketing team at VirtuIT, we're seeing these type of responses for these specific campaigns. Why don't you check out messaging that aligns more with this? It seems to be resonating. Got it. And so on and so forth.

Tim Fitzpatrick
And just so people know, how big is the VirtuIT team as a whole?

Gary McConnell
So VirtuIT overall, depending on who you talk to, we're a larger player or a small guy. We're 32 employees now. Okay, we've hired a bunch at the start of the year. I shared numbers with you. I'm not going to go into the revenue, but you know where that sits.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. The reason I asked that is I think it gives people some context as to like, hey, how many people do you have to have a couple of inhouse people focused on marketing and outsourcing stuff? Because I think a lot of businesses struggle with that, should I be outsourcing marketing? Should I hire people in house? Frankly, my answer to that is it depends on where you're at, what your goals are, and what you need to focus on.

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Sales and Marketing is just as Important as the Actual Service Fulfillment

Tim Fitzpatrick

But at least give people some context, which leads me into the next thing I want to ask you about, still in the sales and marketing side of things. You said to me in the pre interview that sales and marketing, that focus is just as important as the actual service fulfillment, the technical fulfillment. How and why did you adopt that mindset?

Gary McConnell
I can't answer that question without giving you a little bit of the VirtuIT history.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Sure.

Gary McConnell
Sorry to bore you, but I'm going to do it anyway.

Tim Fitzpatrick
No, it's all good, man.

Gary McConnell
When we were founded in 2006, it was by two former Dell EMC engineers. It wasn't Dell at the time, Dell EMC were not combined. It was EMC. Two former EMC engineers. Our ownership is engineering at heart. From a personality perspective, you tend to gravitate. Our honor will tell you, to this I gravitated to people that were similar to me. I like engineers. I hire engineers. For 15 plus years, we grew the majority of our business on the engineering side. We still to this day tell our differentiator as our technical talent and our ability to scope, design, implement and continuously manage your infrastructure better than people at larger OEMs just because that engineering mindset that has remained true to our DNA. But what happens is you start to limit the growth a little bit because you're not putting yourself out there. You're not marketing all of that technical talent. It's almost as if you're doing a disservice to the market by not showcasing what you have to offer. Mercedes is a great car, but if you don't take it out for a spin and show everybody, maybe it's a poor example, but doesn't even exist.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Depending on which conversation I'm having, you can put it multiple ways. But if you don't have sales and marketing bringing in leads and converting them to customers, it doesn't matter how great your service is because nobody's going to freaking know about it. So you're the best kept secret out there, which nobody wants to be. I love that you have that mindset. A lot of people don't initially. So the fact that you're sharing that back story of, Hey, we came from this engineering background, so we really weren't thinking about that. That's not uncommon. That happens all the time. But what typically ends up happening is people hit a ceiling like you guys did where you're like, Hey, all our eggs are in one basket. This is all referral. If we're really going to scale and do it consistently, consistently and more predictably, we have to have a lead generation engine and find other channels to start generating leads. I think it's when people get to that place where that shift really starts to happen where it's like, Gosh, in reality, we're a marketing company first and an IT company second.

Gary McConnell
Well said. One of the things that has happened as the industry has evolved, you have to evolve with customer demands. As we grew up as a company, we were able to be much more of just a VAR, a value added reseller, or just reselling hardware. As the industry has evolved, you see conversations with customers that don't just want to buy the hardware from you. They want you to also help them design it. They want you to implement it. They want you to manage it along with or coincided with their teams. They want to make sure you're addressing any security gaps. It's a much different conversation when you're just selling hardware to now you're expected from presale to post sale to mitigating security issues. You can't invest into those different avenues of business or really reinvest in skill sets that your customers are looking for without the sales and marketing piece. That was probably our biggest driver in terms of we need to get our name out there.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Is that shift or adaptation to changes in the market?

Gary McConnell
Very much. We have more conversations now than ever where they want to see one bill at the end of the month. They don't want to buy their hardware from XYZ Corp and then have John Doe's company install it and then maybe Dell come in and manage it. We don't sell ourselves as a one stop shop, but we are true technical architects and consultants. But the reason we've been able to make that transition is by growing our sales and marketing practice so that we can reinvest into those additional lines of business where we may or may not have before, but the market has demanded it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
I want to break this down a little bit because I know we were planning on talking about this now is a perfect time to do it. That changing and adapting to the market was one of the one of the biggest successes that you had shared with me. You started to break this down. I just want to make sure that I understand this because I think this is a really important point for people to pick up on is it was the choice of investing in sales and marketing that helped you actually make that change successfully is what I'm hearing. Am I hearing that right?

Gary McConnell
Absolutely. We're companies overall tend to focus on... If you go look at Wall Street earnings and quarter over quarter growth, we don't focus on quarter over quarter growth, but we do focus on annual growth. Why do we focus on annual growth? Not just so that we have a good number at the end of the year on the bottom line, but so that we can take those dollars and reinvest them into a new security practice that's going to help our current existing customers or new customers that may come knocking on our door. Without that growth, we don't get to reinvest into those type of areas. The sales and the growth is period in understanding why you're looking to grow in the first place and what you expect to do with those dollars. It's essential.

Tim Fitzpatrick
If you're doing it successfully, that growth that's coming from the sales and marketing effort is freeing up capital that you can, like you said, reinvest with out having to always lean on outside investors or loans, that stuff. If you're driving enough top line and it's profitable, it gives you a lot more freedom than you would have otherwise.

Gary McConnell
Absolutely. I'm a business nerd at heart, so I'm going to go through an example. I used to love watching Amazon progress as a company because because at one point they were an online retailer and nobody heard about this thing called AWS. What Amazon did was corporate magic, if you will. They hid their reinvestments into AWS under an R&D line item on their 10 case that came out annually. Then all of a sudden in 2015, 2016, they have this Amazon, they show this AWS product that generates billions of dollars and has just multiplied year over year. AWS came to fruition because Amazon showed growth within their online retailing company. Their company as a whole was able to take those dollars, reinvest into a completely new line of business, didn't have to take on outside capital, or at least that much of it, their public company. So they certainly took on outside capital and provided better service to the market for it.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Gary, I'm so glad you brought this point up because I think it is... So many of us look at investing in sales and marketing just to drive revenue and generate more leads. But this is a really interesting byproduct or potential byproduct of it that a lot of people don't think about. So I appreciate you bringing that up because I think it's a really good point.

Communication is Key in Keeping Sales and Marketing in Alignment

Tim Fitzpatrick

A couple more things I want to pull out of here today because I know you got some other good stuff to share. So one of the challenges that you guys face is just ensuring that sales and marketing, those teams are in total alignment. And this is a common thing that happens. Depending on how people approach it, they're diverging down different paths. If you're going to be successful long term, they definitely are in alignment. What kinds of things are you guys doing to keep those two teams in alignment?

Gary McConnell
Sure. So first is the is the constant communication. If you've worked in sales or marketing, both examples I'll give you will sound familiar. Sales will say, Well, gee, marketing gave me a Gmail account. It's not even a qualified lead. And marketing will say, Well, if sales didn't take two weeks to follow up on that Gmail account, they might have had themselves a new customer. Depending on the spectrum of your fall, whether it's marketing or sales, there's those type of conversations. So it's the constant communication in the expectation setting, whether a lead comes in, whether it's a Gmail account or a true business organization looking to purchase, you need to be communicating with your sales team early and often. And your sales team needs to be giving direct feedback to the marketing team as well. These are when leads are coming in that are working. This is where we're not seeing as much success. But more importantly than that is a unified message. If your sales and marketing teams are effective, your marketing team is, I like to think on the front lines out there communicating and getting in front of these people. The sales team needs to be communicating at a deeper level to the expectation that the marketing team has set. So constant communication, a unified message, depending on what the campaign is, and just setting the appropriate expectations across both teams. I know I'm oversimplifying it here. I promise you all it's not that simple. It's hard, contrary to what you may see online. But if you can do it right, you'll fire on all cylinders.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Yeah. Gary, as far as I'm concerned, you nailed the answer to that question. I will just add a few quick things just to highlight some of the things you said because when we work on, we call it a magnetic messaging playbook, to create clients' marketing messaging, it's not just marketing. That playbook should, if it's being implemented correctly, it's a marketing tool, it's a sales tool, it's a customer service tool, because that message needs to be consistent throughout the entire customer journey, which is exactly what you said. Because if marketing generates a lead that goes to sales and the message that that prospect hears from a salesperson is totally different. The breaks go on, right? They're like, Whoa, what the heck? You guys were telling me this. So super, super important. And that communication back and forth, like you said, is so critical because on the marketing side, we may be thinking something specific or this particular type of message is resonating, but sales can actually confirm that. Like, hey, when you're talking to the prospects, what are they talking about from a problem perspective? How are they putting it? How are they saying it? We want to hear that in their own words. And man, that constant communication can eliminate a lot of the roadblocks that sales runs into and marketing runs into if that line of communication is open and happening consistently. So I totally agree with you, man.

Trying to be a One Stop Shop is a Mistake

Tim Fitzpatrick

So thank you for sharing that. I want to talk about one of the mistakes you guys made. You shared with me that you guys invested in partnerships across different vendors because you wanted to be able to serve customers wherever they were. You wanted to meet them where they're at and take care of all their needs. You said to me, Hey, Tim, that was a mistake. What did you learn from that? How have you shifted the business to help drive growth?

Gary McConnell
I love talking about this, and I cring at old practices because we used to have on our website, I believe, at one point that said, Hey, where are your one stop shop? I told you earlier in this interview, we are not your one stop shop. What we've done in the past is said, Okay, well, I told you, we're a large Dell EMC partner. We sell a lot of their infrastructure. What we've done in the past years ago is we'd say, Okay, well, we're going to be a Dell, an IBM, an HP. We're going to take all these and we're going to learn all these OEM products and our engineers are going to be able to fulfill all of them. I told you we're 32 people. We're not a billion dollar conglomerate. So trying to be all things and understand all things and do all things well to everybody just wasn't effective. One, it frustrates the sales team because they have competing products that they have to learn continuously. Our sales team does have to understand competitive products because they need to know where our product fits and how we displace competitive products. But that doesn't mean they need to try to sell all of them. And then the engineering team doesn't need to try to try to fulfill every competitor on the market and go through all these trainings. I've worked with this vendor before, but I haven't touched this one before. It sounds simple, but we've established the relationships where we think fit best for each line of business. And if the customer comes to us, we say, Great, we know this really well. If you're working with us or you're procuring this thrust, this is the product that we're bringing to market. The challenging part of that conversation is it means saying no to business oftentimes, and it means telling a customer, Hey, we're not the best fit for you. But what it does enable is a more simple selling motion and a much simpler fulfillment motion to where we can say, if you're going to work with us for this type of offering, we do this really well. We're going to give you the best possible pricing we can. We can charge more for it because we're experts in it. We know what we are, not what we are or not.

Tim Fitzpatrick
What I'm hearing you say is it makes business easier and much more efficient throughout the entire journey.

Gary McConnell
Absolutely. You alluded to it earlier. It comes down to a customer journey and what is the customer experiencing when working with VirtuIT? We want to make it as easy as possible to work with us, even if that means telling them, Hey, we're not the best fit here. Here's somebody that might be a better fit than us. If you're ever looking for something that falls into our arena, pick up the phone, please. We'd love to be your first call. That has happened. We've had customers actually appreciate the transparency and you establish trust that way because we're not just looking to sell any and everything to every single customer.

Tim Fitzpatrick
As you're talking through this, I'm thinking it's no different than marketing. Marketing is so broad at this point. You can't go to somebody who's is, Oh, yeah. I'm an expert in content, in pay per click, and social media, and blah, blah, blah, blah. No, you can't. You cannot. Not only does it make the business simpler and your fulfillment more efficient, honestly, the end service is better because you know what you do cold.

Gary McConnell
Absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You're not having a guess. It's like, Dude, you guys are EMC and Dell experts. You got a question about EMC or Dell? Just come to us. We'll be able to tell you. Your competitors that are going broader from a product perspective, odds are they're not going to be able to do that.

Gary McConnell
We communicate that to customers that say, Sure, you can go with this much larger player, but this much larger player has relationships with 10 different vendors in this one product line. You can't tell them that they know this, you can't tell us that they know this product better than we do. And you alluded to the marketing piece. Marketing is probably the most guilty arena right now. And I say this as a marketing guy at heart, you know this. You talk to a marketing company, they'll tell you they'll handle your SEO, their PPC, your social media, your digital brand, all of your PR, your link building. There's just no way to tackle all those arenas.

Tim Fitzpatrick
It sounds great as the client. It sounds great, like, Oh, my gosh. I can go to one place and get this all done. In reality, it typically does not work out very well. Most of the time an agency like that really has one or two of those offerings that they really Excel at, and the rest of them they're doing because people ask for it. Again, going down the same path that you guys went down and we're like, Dude, this is not it. We need to shift. But I was the first business that I was a partner in was a wholesale distribution company, and we went down the same path. We made some of the same mistakes. We were selling home theater equipment is where we initially started. So we were selling to contractors who were installing home theaters and doing distributed audio. Our expertise was in home theater and distributed audio. It was an audio video. But as we grew, we realized, Gosh, a lot of our clients are there installing alarm systems and they're installing lighting control and phone systems. We had some success in those categories. Alarm systems, we failed miserably. It was too far outside of our expertise. Frankly, our clients weren't used to buying it from us. They were used to buying it somewhere else that specialized in it. So we tried to do that, right? Be the one stop shop. Hey, we know you're buying this. Why don't you just buy it all from us? And it just didn't work. It was super hard for our salespeople because they didn't know the product. So we went down the exact same path, exact same experience. And when we got rid of it and came back, things were much, much easier.

Gary McConnell
You hit it on the head. It's so hard to say no when you see all of these other arenas that you can be playing in bringing to the market, and it's just not as effective. It's funny, Tim, we did an exercise a few years ago, and it was breaking down what our offerings were in productizing them and putting a bow on them so that we can bring them to the market and provide a better end user experience. We said, Why are we able to charge so much more for storage than our security offerings? The security offerings are in higher demand. The reason being is because we were experts in storage at the time. That remains true to our DNA as well today, but we weren't great in the security realm yet. We understood, Oh, there's a direct correlation between how we charge for value and what we know really, really well.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Knowing what you're good at is super important.

Gary McConnell
Absolutely.

Conclusion

Tim Fitzpatrick
Really, really important. Gary, this has been a fantastic conversation, man. I appreciate you taking the time. I want to ask you one more question before we wrap things up, which is, knowing what you know now, is there anything you would do differently other than not branch out into all kinds of other products?

Gary McConnell
Knowing what I know now, what would I do differently? Well, the first thing that comes to mind is not branching out into all these products. That was probably the largest mistake we made. Knowing what I know now, I would have started building content much sooner. I would have focused on SEO, owning your brand much earlier in the process. The one challenge we ran into is it becomes daunting to say, I'm starting from scratch and I have to build this presence and build all this marketing content and you wait to get started. But the one thing is that the time passes anyway. So what better time to start than now? I would have started sooner is the biggest thing I can say here.

Tim Fitzpatrick
How long did it take you guys to start, one, getting traction, and two, generating some leads from your content and your SEO efforts?

Gary McConnell
Sure. It took us around... If you read some older... 2018 is old, ancient SEO practices now, but it told you six months to a year. We started to see traffic in some contact form submissions hit at around six months really start to hit. I remember within 10 months, we had our first two deals close. I remember how proud of those deals we were. I think there were 1,500 bucks a month between both of them. But to say, hey, look, we built this from... These are our own internal sources of lead generation, and they found us. Now we have these clients that we wouldn't have had without this online presence. That 1,500 bucks a month was meant more to me than any larger client we may deal with now.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Thank you for sharing that because I talk about this in almost every episode but marketing is a long term game. So many people get into it thinking short term, I got to generate leads tomorrow when in reality, most marketing channels and tactics take time. Sure. Which goes back to your point, man, I wish I would have started sooner because it's going to be 6 to 12 months, maybe longer. It just depends on the market that you're in and how competitive it is. But you're at 10 months in and you started to generate some leads from it. Small ones, but you started to generate leads and a lot of people would have already given up at that point.

Gary McConnell
Sure. Those clients are still with us today, Tim.

Tim Fitzpatrick
There you go.

Gary McConnell
They were small at the time, but they're much larger customers now. Like you said, don't give up. It comes to fruition.

Tim Fitzpatrick
You need to be consistent over time and it will work.

Gary McConnell
Absolutely.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Gary, thank you, man. Where can people learn more about you, more about VirtuIT?

Gary McConnell
Perfect. I'll do a shameless plug here at the end for you since you're laying it up for me. If you're looking to learn more about VirtuIT, our website for virtuITsystems.com is the best place to check out our offerings. Our LinkedIn page or my personal LinkedIn page where you can find my contact, reach out to me and we'll put you in touch with whoever on our side can help.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome.

Gary McConnell
This has been great. I've checked out your podcast a bunch. I love what you're doing, so I look forward to continuing to follow your journey as well.

Tim Fitzpatrick
Awesome, man. I appreciate you and appreciate you taking time. Thank you for watching, listening. I appreciate you as well. We'll make sure that those links for VirtuIT and Gary get in the show notes. But it's Gary McConnell 3 if you're on LinkedIn, so search them up, connect with Gary. I've enjoyed connecting with you twice now, so thank you. Guys, we spent a lot of time talking about sales and marketing today because Gary has an extensive background in sales and marketing, so I wanted to pull from that. But man, if you want to accelerate growth, you got to remove your revenue roadblocks. And if you want to identify which of the nine revenue roadblocks are slowing down your growth, you can do that over revenueroadblocksccorecard.com. You can also always connect with us over at rialtomarketing.com. Schedule a free discovery call. I'd be happy to chat with you and help you push through some of those roadblocks on that conversation. So thank you. Until next time, take care.


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About the author, Tim Fitzpatrick

Tired of marketing that doesn't deliver? Ready to create lasting marketing success?

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